September 14, 1917

LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Let him go on, we do

not mind.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

They have not

the manliness to deny it.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

He is the only man who can get up and make any kind of a statement in this House.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

Let the political sewer-pipe from Carleton county possess his soul in patience.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I think that remark

ought to be taken back.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Let him go on. He is

entirely irresponsible.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
Permalink
CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

I will withdraw

it in the House, but I will make it outside the House at the earliest opportunity. There was a meeting held in Toronto by a number of Liberals and the proceedings of that meeting were published by the Toronto Telegram of August 30.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Edmond Proulx

Liberal

Mr. PROULX:

What is the question before the House?

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

What did the

genial member for Prescott ask?

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Edmond Proulx

Liberal

Mr. PROULX:

I asked what was the question' before the House.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
Permalink
CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

What does Sir Clifford Sifton say about it?

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

I presume that

whatever Sir Clifford Sifton says he will stand back of, as I will stand back of what I have to say hefe to-night. Now let us come to this meeting. The record I am going to read from is as true as any gospel that was ever written, and not one of these gentlemen who have returned from that meeting will dare deny a word of it. The hon. member for Russell (Mr. Murphy) and the hon. member for Prescott (Mr. Proulx) were both there, and when they hear me! read those statements they will not deny them. Why will they not deny them? There were thirty other men, candidates in the prov-

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

That is a reliable paper.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

That is a reliable paper. Fancy the hon. gentleman from Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) denouncing the Ross rifle. The hen. gentleman from Edmonton (Mr. Oliver) says that is a truthful paper. Picture the member for Pictou standing up in this House,by the hour to champion the Ross rifle, but when he gets off in the west, in Alberta, he denounces it as an instrument that was murdering the Canadian soldiers at the front. Let us have an end to this humbug forever.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. W. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

I had not intended to take part in this debate this evening, but being, naturally, of a kindly disposition, and recognizing that hon. gentlemen opposite are in somewhat of a quandary as to who shall speak next-

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Liberal

Mr. D. D. McICENZIE:

About twenty men on this side want to speak.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG:

Why do they not speak?

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS:

They will get the opportunity. If there are that many members to speak, I am surprised at the lack of consideration shown by the hon. member for

North Sydney (Mr. McKenzie) in occupying so much time himself, and allowing those hon. members no opportunity to say a word. As no one rose to speak when my hon. friend sat down, I waited a reasonable time, and thought I would help them out. The hon. member from Sherbrooke (Mr. McCrea) found fault with the Prime Minister (Sir Robert Borden), because he said he had not approached the right hon. leader of the Opposition (Sir Wilfrid Laur-ier) in a proper spirit in regard to coalition. He said that the Prime Minister should know, that the leader of the, Opposition was a man who had spent all his life in an earnest endeavour to bring all classes of race and creed in this country to a coalition of amity and perfect love. I could not help thinking, when he was making those remarks, that some of the past history of the right hon. leader of the Opposition had. entirely escaped the memory of my hon. friend from Sherbrooke. I thought of some of the past political history of the country, when the leader of ' the Opposition, instead of being a man of peace, was going to shoulder his musket, and fight on the banks of the Saskatchewan. It did not seem to me that that was in keeping with the statement of the hon. member for Sherbrooke, that the leader of the Opposition was a man of peace, and trying to bring all classes of people together. I thought also of the time when this country, as a part of the Empire, was engaged in the terrible war, and when there was every reason why men on both sides of politics should lay aside their political differences and try and bring the people together, the right hon. leader of the Opposition brought up on the floor of this house a question which he must have known as well, or better than any other man in Canada, was bound to create dissension and discord, and that was the bilingual question-a question which he raised in Parliament, not with any intention to bring about amity and concord between the races of this country, but in my humble judgment, with the deliberate intention of consolidating his own province behind him in the next election. I also call to mind, in this connection, many utterances by the leader of the Opposition in regard to the independence of this country, in regard to England, and British connection, and British institutions, which could not have been intended to have the result, and which could not have had the result, of causing the different races of people in this country to live in greater amity and

accord. Another remark made by the hon. member for Sherbrooke (Mr. MeCrea) caught my attention, in regard to giving the vote to women. That did not exactly suit the hon. member for Sherbrooke. He rather took exception to the fact that some soldier overseas might have five or six relatives on this side of the water who, under this Bill, would be enabled to cast their ballot in the coming election. He mentioned the fact incidentally, not in any boastful way, of his own son being overseas, and I congratulate him on the fact that he has a son overseas, who, I dare say, is doing noble work in this great cause. He said the mother of that boy did not desire a vote, and was not worrying about votes. I can understand that the mother of that boy is thinking of the boy overseas, but it seems to me, that this Bill is giving some worry to the member for Sherbrooke, (Mr. McCrea) because I cannot conceive it possible that the mother of that boy, thinking of him overseas and the danger he is going through, and knowing that he "hould have proper Support, will cast her ballot in favour of a candidate, even though that candidate were the father of her boy, who did not want to send proper support to the mem at the front. What is worrying the member for 'Sherbrooke, and worrying honourable -members on the other side of the House is the fact that they know down in their hearts, that these women who are spending sleepless nights, their eyes filled with tears and their heart' wrung with anguish because o.f their boys overseas, having been given the ballot will cast their votes in support of this Government, because they know they can trust this Government to keep faith wdth the boys at the front. That honourable gentleman took exception to the fact, as had others, on that side o-f the House, to some men, British subjects, who, for some years, have been living in the United States, coming over into Canada, putting on uniforms, going across the .seas and fighting. They take exception to these men being given the ballot. They are British -subjects, living on the other side of the line. They say they have no interest whatever in this country. But can they say truthfully of a man when he chooses to risk his l-ife in defence of ~"a country, that he takes no interest in that country? It is all right for these British subjects to come from another -country in-

to Canada to put on the uniform and go overseas to fight for the defence of Canada, but they say it is not right for these men to fight in defence of Canada with the ballot. We on this side of the House say if they see fit to go overseas and defend Canada with their bayonet, they should also have the right to defend her with their ballot and prevent the country getting into the hands of men not in sympathy with Britain and British institutions, and with the cause of our boys overseas.

.The honourable gentleman also referred to coalition. I leave it to you, Mr. Speaker, to eveTy honourable gentlemen in the House, and every man in Canada, could any gentleman have done more than has been done by the iPrime .Minister of Canada, in endeavouring to secure a coalition or union government? From the beginning of the war the right honourable gentleman at the head of this Government has shown that he had before him but one object and purpose in life, and that was the winning of the war.

He has been prepared to sacrifice himself; he has shown that he has had no personal ambitions; his only aim has been the successful prosecution of this war. He made the leader of the Opposition such an offer as, I venture to say, never before was made by the leader of a government to the leader of an Opposition in any civilized country in the world. He offered him, an equal footing, a fifty-fifty basis of coalition. He did his utmost to further this proposal, but the leader of the Opposition would have nothing to do with it. Why? Because the leader of the Opposition and many hon. gentlemen on his side of the House were opposed to conscription. We have the statement of General Sir Arthur Currie, the head of our Canadian troops in Europe-a Liberal, by the way-that assistance is imperative if we are to maintain the proud position which our boys have won for us upon the fields of France and Flanders. That statement is backed up by the statement of the editor of the Globe, Stewart Lyon, the accredited correspondent of the Canadian press overseas, a man who a few months ago was opposed to conscription, but who, having seen conditions on the battlefield as they really are, has arrived at the conclusion that there is only one way to support the boys at the front and that is by adlopting compulsory military service. We have further the evidence of other men, who are nonpartisan, and have been impressed by the conditions at the front, and who regard

conscription as the only- means of giving proper support to our boys overseas. We have also, in support of the contention that conscription is the only means of giving our boys proper support, the attitude of twenty-seven Liberal members of this House, who by their votes and by their speeches have shown that in their estimation the leader of the Opposition is to bring about the passing of conscription If these gentlemen meant what they said; if their votes really meant anything they should have backed up this measure; they should have backed up

the Government in every step taken to bring about the passing of conscription and to keep in power the party that will best make that Conscription Act effective. An election is pending; the issue at the election will he the question of compulsory military service. There is no other issue before the country. The question is: shall we enforce conscription and get the necessary ni'en to support our boys at the front? The attitude taken by the leader of the Opposition is that if the people of the country should, through an election or referendum, express themselves as being in favour of conscription, then a .measure of compulsory service should 'be adopted. But what if a referendum should have an opposite result? The men who are overseas should receive no support; that is the only conclusion that can be drawn from his argument. that is impressed upon the minds of the women of Canada, especially those who have relatives fighting in the Canadian forces overseas.

It has been said by different gentlemen on the other side that the purpose of this Bill is to win the election. If hon. gentlemen mean that, then we must conclude that they oppose this Bill because they think that by retaining on the voters' list those whom we propose to disfranchise, and by keeping off the lists the names of the wives, daughters, and sisters of soldiers, they will -be enabled to win the election. Viewing the matter from that standpoint, let us suppose an election is on. The leader of the Opposition, at the head of the anti-conscription party, is reviewing those who give him their %upport in that election. We will suppose also that the Prime Minister, wiho is in favour of conscription, is reviewing before him those electors and voters who are favourable to his side of the case. Let us look at the two crowds as they pass before the leaders. In the crowd passing before the leader of the Opposi-

tion, you find the anti-British element from the province of Quebec.

The member for Sherbrooke (Mr. McCrea) may smile; but you would find that element there. I do not say that the member for Sherbrooke is anti-British, but I am telling him where he will find himself in this election. You have men in that crowd who tried to murder Lord Atholstan and to blow up his house with dynamite.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
Permalink
LIB

Jacques Bureau

Liberal

Mr. BUREAU:

I rise to a point of order. The hon. gentleman has no right to say that he will find men in that crowd-pointing to the Liberal party-who tried to murder Lord Atholstan. Those people belong to the hon. gentleman's crowd.

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT.
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR THIRD READING DISCUSSED UNDER RUDE 17B.
Permalink

September 14, 1917