August 23, 1917

LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

What appears to be an omission in subsection 3 of this section is provided for by paragraph (e) of subsection 1 of section 4, which says:

Six scrutineers, three to be appointed on the nomination of the Prime Minister, and three on that of the leader of the Opposition. The appointment shall state the respective addresses at which notices given under this part may be served. One of each nomination may be present on each occasion of the opening of ballot boxes, and at the examination, application and counting of ballots, and every scrutineer shall have and may exercise all the rights of a candidate or his representative at any poll.

I think that is- sufficient, because subsection 3 of section 12 provides that the ballot shall be opened only in the presence of the returning officers and clerks.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I might point out that subsection 1 requires that notice shall be given to the -scrutineers before these operations are begun. As I understood it, notice to scrutineers implied their presence, but it might be better to make it clear by inserting it wherever there is occasion for it.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. GERMAN:

Why is there so much

delay in counting the ballots? They are not to be counted until the thirty-first day after that fixed for polling in Canada.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

The delay is provided

in order to make sure there will be time for all the ballot boxes overseas to reach their destination.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. GERMAN:

Why not begin to count them as -soon as they come in?

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

As the ballots come in the envelopes will be assorted and distributed -among the different constituencies to which they apply. The ballot boxes will be counted when all the boxes are in or on the thirty-first day, which is the time when the axe falls.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. GERMAN:

How will the officers '

know when the last ballot box is in? They might not be in within thirty-one days.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

They should all be in

before that. The ' reason why the ballots are not counted immediately they come in is that you would not have all the ballots belonging to a constituency until all the ballots from everywhere had come in and had been assorted. It may be that thirty-one days' delay is too long, but I would rather err on the side of giving perhaps -a little too much time, than risk a number of ballots being left out by making the time too short.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

Charles Murphy

Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

Apart from the time limit fixed for counting, is any other method provided by which it will be known when the ballot boxes are all in?

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

By law we assume to be all in on the thirty-first day after the polling day.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

Alexander Kenneth Maclean

Liberal

Mr. A. K. MACLEAN:

Might it- not be wise to provide that the counting may proceed before the thirty-first day if it is found that all the boxes are in? Some record will be kept of the boxes, and it will be known when they are all in.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink
CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

That might be done. It might be wise to provide for that if there was reason to think this delay was too long.

If we do that, we shall have to provide that any counting done earlier

10 p.m. than the thirty-first day shall be be done after notice to the scru-

tineers. It has been assumed here that as we were fixing a specific date on which the counting would be done there was no need to provide for notice to the scrutineers, who would have already been notified of the preliminary operations and would be assumed to know when the counting was to take place. If we are to make provision for an uncertain date, it will involve very considerable remodelling and the necessity of a new notice being given.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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LIB

Alexander Kenneth Maclean

Liberal

Mr. A. K. MACLEAN:

I think most of the boxes would be in before the thirty-first day.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

That is not impossible.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

I think there is a great deal of force in what the minister says as to fixing a precise date on which the counting shall take place. The only thing I do not understand is why it should be necessary to allow thirty-one days from the polling day. It would only be a matter of a few hours, I should think, before the ballots in the British Isles would arrive in London, and the ballots on the continent in Paris. It seems to me unreasonable there should be such a long delay.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink
LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

The thirty-one days does not apply to Canada?

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

No, it relates to the proceedings in France and England. I would suggest that this section might perhaps be carried, and we could give a little thought whether it might not be desirable to modify the length of the delay.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink
?

John William Bell

Mr. CARA ELL:

We could let the section carry, on the understanding that we could go back to it.

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink
CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

It would be well that we should specifically state the right of the scrutineers to be present, and therefore I would move:

That the subsection be amended, by inserting in the 27th line thereof, after the word "shall" and before the word "open", the words "in the presence of such scrutineers as may attend".

Topic:   THE MILITARY VOTERS' ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   FURTHER CONSIDERATION IN COMMITTEE.
Permalink

Amendment agreed to.


August 23, 1917