August 18, 1917

REPORT PRESENTED.


Report of the Secretary of State for the year ended March 31, 1916.-Hon. Mr. Roche.


WHEAT REGULATIONS.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Hon. FRANK OLIVER (Edmonton):

I wish to make an inquiry of the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Sir George Foster), who is not in his place, in regard to a notice appearing in the Montreal Gazette this morning respecting the limitation of the price of wheat. Recently an order was promulgated fixing a maximum limit of $2.40 a bushel on wheat of last year's crop after August 1. The statement in the Gazette, as I read it, is that the price of wheat is absolutely fixed at $2.40 a bushel until August 31. I do not understand whether it is stated that the provision has application particularly to last year's or to this year's crop. I wanted to ask the njinister if the provisions of the order are correctly stated.

Topic:   WHEAT REGULATIONS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN (Prime Minister):

In the absence of the Minister of Trade and Commerce, I do not know whether I can give my hon. friend the information that he desires. There has been no recent Order in Council, so far as 1 recollect at the moment, with regard to the price of wheat. There has been, however, a regulation of the commission in regard to the exportation of flour. When the Minister of Trade

and Commerce is present I shall direct his attention to my hon. friend's inquiry and endeavour to give him the information that he asks for.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

1 wish to direct the attention of the Minister of Trade and Commerce to what appears to be an inaccuracy in the statements made by him in the House in respect to a question of mine on August 16th. On that occasion, the minister is reported as saying-page 4746 of Hansard:

At the present moment the price of grain, grade for grade, is less at Minneapolis than it is at Winnipeg.

I have looked up the market reports in the Montreal Gazette and I find that on Thursday the Gazette reports that at Minneapolis, No. 1 Northern was $2.60 to $2.65. Those who are acquainted with the grain trade know that No. 1 Northern at Minneapolis is not better than or worth more than No. 2 Winnipeg; so that there was a very marked difference in the price on that day, according to the report in the Gazette. I think that it is only fair that the attention of the Minister of Trade and Commerce should be drawn to that fact. I should like to draw attention also to the further fact that in this morning's Gazette the Minneapolis price is given, No.

1 Northern, as $2.40 to $2.45. Again I say that No. 1 Northern Minneapolis is no better than No. 2 Winnipeg; therefore there is, even to-day, a marked difference between the Winnipeg and Minneapolis prices, in favour of Minneapolis.

Topic:   WHEAT REGULATIONS.
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Sir GEORGE POSTER@Minister of Trade and Commerce

The other day my hon.

friend from Edmonton (Mr. Oliver) either made a statement or left the impression on the House that the allied producers of wheat in the United States were paying more than was being paid under the fixed price of $2.40 in Canada. I think I expressed, at that time, my impression that that would not be true. I have since received official information, and perhaps it is well that I should give it to my hon. friend and to the House. Since July 1, the highest price paid by the Wheat Commission for export to the Allies in the United States was $2.50 for No. 1 Northern, f.o.b. at Atlantic and Gulf ports. The price quoted on August 17, was $2.27 f.o.b. When my hon. friend takes into account this statement of price and the further consideration that from fifteen to twenty cents is required to carry wheat from Fort William to Atlantic ports, he will see that there was no foun-

dation for any impression he might have or for any statement he might make.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mi. OLIVER:

Before the minister came in, I drew attention to the feature of the discussion in which the remarks alluded to now occurred. If I am not out of order, I might perhaps repeat my remarks, now that the minister is here.

Topic:   WHEAT REGULATIONS.
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CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

Perhaps my hon. friend will let the matter lie over until Monday.

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LIB

PENSIONS TO CANADIANS IN IMPERIAL FORCES.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. E. M. MACDONALD (Pictou):

I

notice a despatch in this morning's papers in regard to a query put in the Imperial House of Commons relating to a matter upon which we might have a statement from the Minister of Militia. A Canadian enlists in the Imperial forces. Is he entitled to receive pension, in the event of being wounded-or in the event of his death, are his relatives entitled to receive pension-from the Canadian Government?

I was under the impression that the report of the committee last year, which was incorporated in an Order in Council, provided that pensions would go to Canadians enlisted in any of the Allied forces. However, in a letter written to me, a young sailor who enlisted when the war began on the other side said that he was anxious to get into the Canadian forces, because if he should be wounded, being a member of the Imperial forces, he would not be entitled to receive Canadian pension. This is a matter of some importance, and if the Prime Minister Gannot give me any information on the subject to-day, perhaps a statement could be made on Monday.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I shall be glad to direct the attention of the Minister of Militia to my hon. friend's inquiry. Whatever recommendations were made by the committee last year-I have not a precise recollection as to this particular point- were embodied exactly in the Order in Council that was passed. There will be a distinction, I think, between the case of a Canadian who actually enlisted in the Imperial forces and that of a Canadian who enlisted in the Canadian forces and was subsequently transferred or attached to the British forces. However, I shall obtain

exact information in regard to the matter and see that it is given to my hon. friend.

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

When is the resolution with regard to pensions to be introduced? Instances have been brought to the attention of many hon, gentlemen indicating the desirability of giving wider discretion to the Pensions Board to deal with cases that could not have been anticipated when the Pensions Act was passed.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

My hon. friend's inquiry is a very reasonable one. I shah make an announcement on the subject early next week.

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WESTERN COAL SUPPLY.


On the Orders of the Day:


August 18, 1917