August 15, 1917

PRICE OF BRAN-SHIPMENTS TO THE UNITED STATES.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Edward Walter Nesbitt

Liberal

Mr. E. W. NESBITT (North Oxford):

Before the Orders of the Day are called I would like to ask the Minister of Trade *and Commerce if he has had any notices from farmers' clubs or otherwise about the millers selling bran on the other side of the line cheaper than they are selling here. I have a letter from the secretary of the Kintore Farmers' Club, of Ontario, enclosing a clipping from Farm .and Dairy to the effect that the Montreal millers had sold three hundred car loads of bran to. go to the United States at $25 a ton, and more recent inquiries revealed that the millers generally are shipping immense quantities of bran to the United States at prices ranging from $25 to $27.50 a ton. At the same time, prices in Canada have ranged from $30 to $32 a ton, and are going higher. Has the minister heard anything of the kind, and has he taken any steps to correct the trouble, if the statement is true?

Topic:   PRICE OF BRAN-SHIPMENTS TO THE UNITED STATES.
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CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

I have not officially any information with reference to the matter. I have seen statements in the newspapers. The market in the United States is open, for the sale of such products and the millers appear to be simply availing themselves of a market which is open to them. They are selling at such prices as they choose to sell.

Topic:   PRICE OF BRAN-SHIPMENTS TO THE UNITED STATES.
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RECRUITING FOR CANADIAN AND BRITISH FORCES IN THE UNITED STATES.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Charles Murphy

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MURPHY (Russell):

I would direct the attention of the Minister of Militia and Defence (Sir Edward Kemp) to this despatch from New York, dated , August 11th, which appeared in the Montreal Gazette:

More than 5,000 men for Canadian and British forces have been recruited in this country toy the British recruiting commission, it was announced here to-day. About 4,400 of these have already gone forward to the depots in Canada, it was stated, the other 600 having been granted time to arrange their affairs.

I desire to ask my hon. friend if the numbers mentioned in this despatch were included in the statement given by him to the hon. member for Halifax (Mr. A. K. Maclean) a few da3rs ago.

Topic:   RECRUITING FOR CANADIAN AND BRITISH FORCES IN THE UNITED STATES.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir EDWARD KEMP:

I could not say whether that would agree with the report I gave the member for Halifax. I have not had the United States returns for a week or so. I .asked for them this morning. I have not the figures in my mind at the moment.

Topic:   RECRUITING FOR CANADIAN AND BRITISH FORCES IN THE UNITED STATES.
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RUMOURED PEACE PROPOSADS.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Charles Murphy

Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

May I ask the Prime

Minister a question.? There is a rumour current to the effect that proposals for peace have been made to all the belligerent countries. Has any such proposal come to this Government?

Topic:   RUMOURED PEACE PROPOSADS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I have not heard of anything of the kind.

Topic:   RUMOURED PEACE PROPOSADS.
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CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

CHANGES IN THE MEDICAL SERVICE.


On the Orders of the Day:


L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Sir SAM HUGHES:

In view of the delay attending the publication of Colonel Bruce's report on the Babtie commission, I would like to ask the First Minister if he will be good enough to tell us what changes have been made in general in the Medical Service in England and at the front within the last twelve months, and whether any further changes are in contemplation, and if so, what is their nature? I do not want the data to-day. I would like to .give the Prime Minister an opportunity to make a statement on the question. The reason I ask

is while we are aware that certain changes have been made along the lines recommended by Colonel Bruce, nevertheless there are other matters of very serious import. I want to give the Government an opportunity of taking charge of the question without any inquiry, but if it does not do-so there will have to be some statement in justice to the soldiers and in justice to all concerned, and I will ask for a day to discuss the question. I would like to let the Prime Minister prepare a statement on it at some convenient time.

Topic:   CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.
Subtopic:   CHANGES IN THE MEDICAL SERVICE.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I will see that the information is available.

Topic:   CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.
Subtopic:   CHANGES IN THE MEDICAL SERVICE.
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CANADIAN RAILWAY SITUATION.

MOTION FOR SECOND READING OF CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY BILL.


Hon. Sir THOMAS WHITE (Minister of Finance) moved the second reading of Bill No. 125, providing for the acquisition by His Majesty of the capital stock of the Canadian Northern Railway Company. He said: In introducing this legislation to the House, I made so complete a statement as to the reasons actuating the Government to acquire the whole of the capital stock of the Canadian. Northern Railway Company, that I deem it unnecessary to say anything further in that connection. I shall, therefore, confine my remarks upon this, the occasion of the second Teading of the Bill, to the principal features of the criticism that was offered to the resolution in committee. The criticism was mainly along three lines. First, it was suggested by certain hon. gentlemen opposite that the Dominion Government, instead of acquiring the capital stock of the Canadian Northern Railway Company, should expropriate the physical undertaking of the company and of the constituent and subsidiary companies constituting the system. Under the legislation which we are adopting, the Dominion Government, by acquiring the capital stock of the Canadian Northern Railway Company, preserves the entities of the Canadian Northern Railway Company 'and of the constituent and subsidiary companies. If we adopted the suggestion that was made that we should acquire the physical properties of the several companies in the system, we should own the assets of all those companies as the Government now owns the Intercolonial and the National Transcontinental from Moncton to Winnipeg. In passing, I may say that such a policy would be in direct contravention of the recommendations of the Drayton-Acworth report, and of the report of the chairman of the commission, Mr. Smith, president of the New York Central Railway Company. Apart, however, from that consideration, there is a great and manifest advantage in maintaining the corporate identity of the Canadian Northern Railway Company, and of its subsidiary and constituent companies. Particularly is this so with reference to the question of the financing of these companies. I pointed out to the House, when we were in committee upon the resolution, that the Canadian Northern Railway Company had in addition to a large funded debt a considerable short term and floating indebtedness, amounting to about $98,000,000. If the Dominion Government acquired by expropriation the physical assets of the Canadian Northern and the other railways in, the system, it would be obliged to find the -money to take care of the short date and other indebtedness I have mentioned, or if it failed to find the money to take care of that indebtedness, it would follow that the creditors of the company in respect of the short term and floating indebtedness, would be in a position to appoint a receiver, with the result that the funded indebtedness would at once become due, as to the principal owing under several trust mortgages securing it. The result would be chaos so far as the financial condition of the system is concerned. I point out to the House that the short term and floating indebtedness is such as to be of some concern to the Government, if it had to be provided for forthwith even in ordinary times; but by reason of the fact that we have entered on the fourth year of the war, with the enormous expenditures which we have in connection therewith, it would be a most serious matter for us to take over the physical properties and assets of -this system and find the money to meet not only the floating and short-term indebtedness, but other indebtedness if it should become due Iby reason of litigation affecting these companies. We take over the system by acquiring its common stock. That will enable the companies, as companies, to continue to finance. So far as concerns the short-term obligations of the company, the Canadian Northern can, in the future, a-s it has in the past, endeavoured to extend these obligations as they mature, or make fresh issues under its corporate powers in that behalf. The result is that the Dominion Government should not be called upon to


August 15, 1917