July 25, 1917

CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

Yes.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

Will a returned soldier

who is eligible as a homesteader be able to take a homestead and then get from the Government under this Bill an adjoining quarter section in addition?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

This Bill does not interfere with a man's homestead rights, so that he can qualify for this 160 acres upon being a soldier and in addition he can exercise his privilege of homesteading under the Dominion Lands Act and take an adjoining homestead.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

Will he be allowed to take a homestead in this reserve?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

Either in or outside of the reserve. He will not be confined to the reserve.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

A man who has not had a homestead in Canada will be able to secure a half-section under this Bill?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

Yes.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON:

What arrangement, if

any, does the minister purpose to make for settling soldiers in those provinces in which they desire 'to settle? I would like to know if any provision will foe made for the expropriation of land of a suitable character and what steps will be taken in that direction.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
LIB

William Roche

Liberal

Mr. ROOHE:

All the public land outside of the three- prairie provinces is Crown land in the right of the provinces and each of the provinces has a land settlement policy of its own. Some of the provinces have already

[Mr. Oliver !

passed legislation with special reference to the returned soldier. Others possibly have in contemplation legislation with special reference to the returned soldier. We thought it advisable, after consultation with the representatives of the various provincial governments, to leave the disposition of the Grown lands of the various provinces entirely to the provincial governments. Some of these provinces, notably Ontario, at the last session of the provincial legislature, gave 80 acres of homestead land in the North ern part of the province to any returned soldier who wished to settle on it. I do not think that Nova Scotia has adopted legislation as yet with special reference to the returned soldiers. However, the returned soldier who desires to locate upon Crown land in Nova Scotia, or who has a little capital of his own and desires to purchase some land, may utilize this section and secure a loan to the maximum amount of $2,500, just the same as those soldiers who want to locate upon the free Dominion lands in the West. The loan part of this Bill is available to the returned soldier in any province of the Dominion and with reference to any land upon which he may desire to locate.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HERBERT AMES:

What course will be pursued where there is already a loan policy on the part of the province? Will both loans be available?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

In that respect the commission will have to measure up their security. They, will have to get the necessary security, which is a first mortgage on the land, and if the provincial government have already granted a loan to the returned soldier on provincial Crown land and got a first mortgage, the soldier would not be eligible under our legislation unless he utilized our loan for the payment of the first mortgage, giving us a first lien.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON:

The difficulty I foresee is this: In certain provinces in Canada, notably, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, there are no free lands suitable for settlement.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

I imagine that there will

he so much rivalry between the various provinces to retain their own soldier population within the confines of these provinces that they will be only too* pleased to adopt land settlement policies of their own and do the same as the provinces of Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick have already done. New Brunswick is expropriating land other than its own Crown lands. Most of the Crown lands are disposed of but they have a land settlement policy under which they iare purchasing unoccupied lands and farms and making them available for returned soldiers. There is no reason why Nova Scotia should not inaugurate a similar policy for her returned soldiers and vie with the other provinces in retaining her own soldier population.

The province of Prince Edward Island sent a deputation here and explained to us that it is their intention to expropriate certain land and they desired to know if they could oo-opeTate with us and take advantage of this loan. We assured them that we would be only too- pleased to have them do so. A returned soldier in Nova Scotia, who has a little money of his own and desires to remain in his own province and take up farming, may purchase whatever land he likes but whether he remains in his own province or whether he desires to take up a praiiie farm, we will, under the provisions of this Bill, advance him $2,500 to pay for the farm. That would strike me as being a much fairer policy than that the Government should step in and expropriate land within these provinces for soldiers to locate upon. I am satisfied that the provincial governments would be only too pleased to do their utmost to supply any available 'Crown lands they have of their own to keep their own soldier population within their own provinces.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON:

If the minister pursues his argument a little further he will see that, upon his own statement, it is quite unnecessary for the Government to introduce this Bill at all. If the provinces will do it, why have this Bill?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

The hon. gentleman overlooks the $2,500 entirely.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON:

No, I am not overlooking it at all. I am speaking of the acquisition of the land. It is going to work a great unfairness to those provinces where the lands are not held in the Crown in the right of the Dominion. Of course, I can do nothing more than express my views to the minister and indicate the course which, in my opinion, the Government should pursue. Instead of adopting this unsatisfactory policy I can only point out what in my judgment would have been a better and a proper policy.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HERBERT AMES:

While the Returned Soldiers Committee were meeting a [DOT]large number of deputations waited upon us, many of which referred to land settlement. We found that no two provinces asked for the same thing in the matter of land settlement, and we have a large number of memorials in our evidence, which members can read for themselves, coming from various provinces with reference to the conditions of settlement of returned soldiers. We found in each ease that the pro-

378(6

posals were adapted to the particular conditions of the provinces themselves. If these provinces were to control their own regulations, we thought the better way would be to allow each to take its own time to work out a policy of its own with reference to the assisting of returned soldiers having reference to the peculiar conditions obtaining in each province. A number of the provinces have already parsed statutes and they are planning several more- One proposition for land settlement that has been very popular in the Maritime Provinces is the community settlement plan. Several projects were submitted to us, the essential idea of which is that land should he expropriated, a central village established in each area and small farms within a radius of it taken by persons who might have a house and a barn in the little village that it is proposed to create. All the schemes have special reference to the province wherein they were devolved, and it seems to me that we can rely upon each of the provinces adopting legislation which will suit the soldiers of these different provinces.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink
LIB
CON

William James Roche (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of the Interior)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE:

We have not drawn the line so fine as that. We have defined "settler" to mean "any person who has served in the naval or military expeditionary forces of Canada during the present war."

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS.
Subtopic:   THE SOLDIER SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Permalink

July 25, 1917