July 13, 1917

CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I do not propose to be niggardly at all. I appreciate what my hon. friend has said about these people being pioneers with their all invested in that part of the country, and we shall bear that in mind in dealing with this matter.

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LIB
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COOHRANE:

They get their mail from the Grand Trunk Pacific.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Yes, at Peers. The distance is six or seven miles, but the map shows it to be only five, and I fancy it is a pretty bad road. There must be quite a number of settler-s in that settlement, because they were there before -the railway, I do not know what -representations have been made to the minister, but I am just drawing to his attention that the pioneers of

this settlement were there before the railroad.

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I think the mill was there before the railroad.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Very likely. I never travelled through that country before the railroad was built, but I have been on the railroad since.

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

Referring to a

previous item, last year and the year before a survey was made for a proposed short line leaving the Intercolonial at some point about Glengarry and making for the straits of Canso. Has anything been done in regard to the matter?

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Nothing has been done, and it is not likely that anything will be done until after the war.

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LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

About a month ago I drew the minister's attention to the taking up of the tracks leading to the Sackville wharf. The minister replied, reasonably enough, that the tracks had been taken up for shipment to France to be used by the Imperial Government. It is a matter of only a few hundred yards, and I think the officials of the road were a little panic stricken when they took up these rails, for they are pretty old, having been there for a number of years, and weigh 56 pounds. I have been home since last speaking to the minister about this, and I find that the people are absolutely held up because of the lack of this little piece of track. Is it not possible for the minister to give the people of that section this wharf accommodation?

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I hope to be able to do it very soon. We are getting 12,000 tons of rails rolled at Sydney, and I think most of them are ready now. As soon as we can get the rails out of the main line and put these in, we shall attend to this matter.

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LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

In the fall coal comes in by schooner, and it would be a very great convenience to the people of that section if the minister could get the rails put down at as early a date as possible.

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

We will do it as soon as possible.

Progress reported.

On motion of Hon. Mr. Rogers, the House adjourned at 11.25 p.m.

Saturday, July 14, 1917.

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July 13, 1917