June 1, 1917

STRIKE AT SOREL.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX:

I understand that two or three hundred men in the Government shops at Sorel ha\re declared a strike and that the Government have decided to close the shops for a fortnight. May I ask the Minister of Marine and Fisheries whether any arrangement has been arrived at?

Topic:   STRIKE AT SOREL.
Permalink
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. J. D. HAZEN (Minister of Marine):

We had some trouble there, but I am glad to say that the shops are now open and that work has been resumed.

Topic:   STRIKE AT SOREL.
Permalink
LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

The. men have all gone

back to work.

Topic:   STRIKE AT SOREL.
Permalink
LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

We are considering the question of pay. We have granted increases in certain cases where increases were deemed right and proper. As a matter of fact, the matter was being considered

when the men took the ill-advised step of striking.

Topic:   STRIKE AT SOREL.
Permalink

SUSPENSION OF COASTAL REGULATIONS.


On the Orders of the Day:


?

Hon. W@

I am informed that the Government has by Order in Council suspended the provisions of the Coastal Act under which United States vessels are carrying grain for the use of the Allies. It is necessary, I assume, that those vessels should use more than one Canadian port. Can the right hon. Prime Minister inform the llouse whether any action has been taken in the matter? '

Topic:   SUSPENSION OF COASTAL REGULATIONS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

No action has been taken as yet.

Topic:   SUSPENSION OF COASTAL REGULATIONS.
Permalink

SUPPLY.


The House in Committee of Supply, Mr. Blain in the Chair. Ocean and river service-To provide for the construction of two steamers to replace the Quadra, $150,000.


LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Will those' steamers be

constructed in Canada and will they be built of steel or of wood?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

When they come to be constructed, they will be constructed in Canada and they will be built of wood. The Quadra was lost in collision, and we find that we can do very much better by building two smaller vessels than by. building one large vessel. We have managed to get along in the meantime by chartering a vessel, and in view of existing conditions, it is not likely we shall proceed with the construction of those vessels this year. That is a matter for consideration.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Has the minister any

intimation to make in regard to the building of wooden vessels in eastern Canada. Early in this session we had an intimation from the Minister of Finance that the Government was giving some consideration to the question of constructing wooden vessels, and I think my hon. friend the Minister of Marine and Fisheries rather held out the hope that an announcement on the subject might be made in the not distant future; but to my surprise, the Minister of Trade and Commerce, a few days ago, made the statement that the Government was not building and did not purpose building any wooden vessels in Canada. I am sure that statement will be a disappointment to a great many in eastern Canada

who would like to see the question of building wooden ships actually taken up by the Government.

In this connection, I would also like to call the attention of the minister to the fact that I am informed that the Imperial Munitions Board, limiting, as they have done, )o 2,500 tons the size of wooden vessels which they are having built for the Imperial Government, are discouraging people in the Maritime Provinces and in other parts of eastern Canada from the idea of utilizing timber from British Columbia, which timber, as the minister knows, is necessary for the construction of larger vessels. The ground on which that is based is, I believe, , that it would be difficult to supply transportation for British Columbia lumber to eastern Canada. I am not sure whether the Imperial Munitions Board, in making that statement, has been influenced at all by the extraordinary action of the minister of Railways in taking up the heavy rails on the Transcontinental and the Grand Trunk Pacific. Of course, the taking up of those rails and the substitution of lighter rails would very considerably interfere with the facilities for the transportation of heavy material at low rates of freight over the Transcontinental road. I would have thought that the Imperial Munitions Board and this Government would be disposed to encourage the bringing of British Columbia timber for use in the shipyards of eastern Canada, and I was very much surprised to learn that the Imperial Munitions Board had taken the action they did. There is, however, in eastern Canada, plenty of material for the building of wooden vessels of smaller size, and it might be desirable to have those two vessels built at once so that something may be done in the way of establishing shipbuilding in eastern Canada.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

Those vessels are for use on the Pacific coast. The Quadra, which they will replace, was used on the Pacific coast in connection with the Marine Department.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

If those two vessels were constructed in eastern Canada, they could be taken 'to British Columbia via the Panama canal. Perhaps this is a good time to ask my hon. friend if anything has resulted from his suggestion to the representatives of the British Government that they should engage in the building of smaller vessels. Only the day before yesterday, at a branch meeting of the Manufacturers' Association, held in the city of St. John, the matter of building smaller wooden vessels

came up, and very strong feeling was expressed in favour of the Government taking up the matter of building wooden vessels. Such vessels are very much required, as my hon. friend will agree. It is almost impossible to-day to obtain vessels for carrying on the coastal service of Canada, and it is almost impossible to secure vessels to bring anthracite coal from the Pennsylvania mines for use in factories, for heating dwellings, and for general use in the cities of the Maritime Provinces. The question is becoming a very serious one, and I would like to hear from the Minister of Marine and Fisheries whether any steps have been or are likely to be taken by the Government to engage as a Government operation-I do not mean by encouraging private individuals-in the building of smaller wooden vessels in Canada.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink

June 1, 1917