May 1, 1917

LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I read what you said

the other day.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Read it again.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I read it exactly as

it appears in Hansard; I did not put in one word that the hon. gentleman did not say.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Perhaps you did not

read it all.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I did read it all, so

far as was necessary tp my argument. If there were fluctuations of lli

11 p.m. cents, that shows that there are bids which are not placed on the Liverpool markets and that the rule which my hon. friend has laid down is not good. This is an erratic world, and I think one of the most erratic things in it is the grain market. It is difficult to say how the grain market will go.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Does the hon. gentleman still say that there is not a balance of trade in favour of Germany?

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

According to the Government blue-bo;oks there is a balance of trade against them.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

You quoted what it was, not what it is.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I do not know what

Germany is doing now; I suppose she is doing what the British fleet lets her do.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I object to my hon.

friend's making a speech in the middle of my remarks.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

My hon. friend challenged me a moment ago; perhaps he will let me answer him now.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I think that my hon.

friend is rather infringing on his privileges; he is making another speech. I quoted the remarks of my hon. friend, word for word, I showed that he was absolutely wrong, and he dares not deny it.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I wish to deny it now, but you will not let me. I want to show you where you are wrong.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I will read my hon.

friend's words again.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The hon. gentleman

will not let me deny it.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

I will let you deny it, but I do not want you to make a speech. This is the second time that the hon. gentleman has attempted to make a speech in the middle of my remarks, and I do not propose to allow it. The hon. gentleman said, in speaking of the balance of trade:

It is unfortunately true that her rivals in this struggle have enormous balances of trade in their favour, and have, within their own borders-

And so on. Now what balance of trade Germany has in her favour since the war began I do not think my hon. friend knows; I do not, because we cannot know exactly what is going on in that country, as Germany is not giving out any such information. I have quoted up to the time of the war, and in all these years the balance of trade was against Germany.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

She was gaining very rapidly.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON:

It is true that in the last years she had not been gaining very rapidly. For one year before the war she had made a big jump. I have looked up the figures for the last ten or fifteen years, and I have found that the average is about the same as it was during those five years, a little less, I think, so that she has not been gaining. She may have gained in one year, but you cannot prove'things by one quotation. One swallow does not make a summer, although, if my hon. friend so desired, he could prove to his own satisfaction that one swallow made half a dozen summers.

I was dealing with the question of free wheat and of my hon. friend's proof of the statement that we were getting no benefit on the higher grades of wheat. He claims

to prove that by the conditions of the market for one day. I have read a great many opinions of experts in the grain trade, hundreds of which opinions are quoted in the newspapers, and I do not remember seeing a single one that claimed for a moment that the market quotations of the day cited by my hon. friend prove anything, although he says that they prove everything; that they settle the whole question. I submit it does not; the mere fact that there were certain spreads on one day proves nothing. I might just as well claim that because the prices are to-day from 40 to 50 cents a bushel higher than they were at the time the Order in Council was passed, therefore the prices have advanced on account of wheat being put on the free list. The experts do not contend for a moment that the quotations of that day prove anything. Mr. James Car-ruthers, in the Financial Post of the 28th of April, speaking of free wheat, says:

I believe it will prove a great benefit to our farmers. Free wheat will contribute to the prosperity of the western farmer, and consequently to his contentment.

I fancy, if I am not mistaken, that Mr. Carruthers was an expert in grain matters when my hon. friend was running around in pantaloons, although ,my hon. friend thinks that he knows more than Mr. *Carruthers about this .subject. I quote from the Nor-West Farmer of the 20th of April:

Regarding- the permanent benefits of the removal of the duty on wheat, only time can actually determine.

My hon. friend, however, thinks he can determine it from one day's quotations.

_ It will mean much to the western farmers; it will give them this great southern market at their very door, which will be utilized whenever it is advantageous to do so. This will be a permanent advantage.

My hon. friend says it is at present advantageous for him to have free wheat on account of the low grades of wheat, and I grant he is right; but it is advantageous for him to have it at all times, because of the fact that our highest grade of wheat, which is better than anything the American farmer produces, is wanted at all times by the Minneapolis miller for mixing purposes, and he is always willing to pay a little extra price for it, so if we always have that market we shall always get that benefit. I do not purpose saying anything further about this Order in Council or Statute. I tried to secure a little information from my hon. friend when

he was speaking, when he claimed that the Order in Council wa3 in exactly the same position as a statute. I asked him if the Order in Council could not be repealed at any momnt by another Order in Council, and he admitted that it could. I am not sure whether he meant by the further answer that he made, to leave the impression that if a statute were passed, it could also be repealed by an Order in Council. My hon. friend may be a little rash sometimes and so may his Government, but they would hardly -be so rash as to repeal, by an Order in Council, an Act passed by this House shortly before. I am not, however, going to enter into a discussion as to whether or not an Act of Parliament passed in this way could be repealed by an Order in Council.

Topic:   THE POTATO SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET.
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink

May 1, 1917