April 25, 1917

LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Sure I said that.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

I agree to every word of that. But let me say. that from 1891 until 1896, when the Conservative party were in power, the Intercolonial was operated under the management of Mr. Ppttinger who had been manager for many years and who had, so far as I know, carried on the operation of the railway successfully. I have nothing but words of praise to utter, in so far as Mr. Pottinger is concerned. Yet, during all that time, hon. gentlemen opposite criticised the management of the

Intercolonial just as they are doing now. Mr. Pottinger was not fit to run the road, according to them everything was run politically.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Mr. Boulay is not on

this side of the House; Mr. Boulay is on that side of the House.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

By the support of Mr. Bou-lay's resolution I think all the hon. members opposite are coming over to this side.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB
CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

No, as supporters of ours.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB
CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID :

Oh, yes. I was going to say-

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

It is kind ,of in the air, like.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mt. REID:

I was going to say that when the Liberals came into power they at once decided to make a change. Mr. Pottinger was not considered by them tp be qualified to run the road. Although there are in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia men with as much brains as in any other part of Canada, although there were men on the Intercolonial who had served from boyhood up, yet, instead of taking a man with brains from Nova Sootia or New Brunswick, they went to the Grand Trunk and took Mr. Harris as general manager of the Intercolonial. Where were the men with brains from Nova Scotia or New Brunswick at that time? The Liberals then showed that, so far as they were concerned, they had to go outside of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to get a man to operate the Intercolonial, and they went to the Grand Trunk railway. They were not satisfied with Mr. Harris and they put back Mr. Pottinger whom they had been condemning for fifteen or twenty years. But again Mr. Pottinger was not satisfactory. Why? Because they wanted to run the road politically. Then they wanted some more men with brains. Did they go to Nova Scotia or New Brunswick? They came right up to Ontario and went to the Canadian Pacific Railway and took Mr. Brady off the Canadian Pacific and made him superintendent of the Intercolonial. Although the hon. member for Carleton stated a few moments ago that they could produce men in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick who had been serving on the Intercolonial for many years and who were competent to act as superintendent, they went to the Canadian Pacific Railway and took Mr. Brady.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

Did you approve of Mr. Brady at that time?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

That is not the question I am discussing. They went further, they came here to Ottawa and formed a Board. How many men did they take from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick for that Board? The first man was Mr. Campbell, the deputy minister, who is from the province of Ontario. They wanted another man. Did they go to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick? They took Mr. Caron from the city of Ottawa, who had never run a railway in his life. They wanted another man to make up the Board. Did they go to the Intercolonial? Did they take an operating man? No, they went to the Grand Trunk and took Mr. Tiffin.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

No, Mr. Tiffin was on the Intercolonial at the time and had been for years.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

Mr. Tiffin was taken from the Grand Trunk and put on the Intercolonial by the Liberal party.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB
CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

He was taken from the Grand Trunk and put on the Intercolonial as an employee.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

The minister is getting excited. He was going along at a pretty good gait and has got into deep water. His memory has failed him. Mr. Tiffin was an old employee in charge of the traffic on the Intercolonial when he was placed on this Board. In addition to that, Mr. Pot'tinger was 'placed on this Board. This Board was modelled on the lines of the management of the Pennsylvania railway, and the heads of the several departments composed it. In deference to the French-speaking people living along the Intercolonial, the Liberal Government did what had never been done before; they placed a French-speaking man on that Board to have something to say as to how the road should be managed. That was Mr. Caron, formerly of the province of Quebec, latterly of Ottawa. As connecting link 'between the Government and the Board, the deputy minister was placed on it as chairman, because the late Government never shirked its responsibility in the management of the Intercolonial. So they made the deputy minister the connecting link with the Government in the management of the road.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

Charles Arthur Gauvreau

Liberal

Mr. GAUVREAU:

And they were all British subjects.

[Mr. J. D. Reich!

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

I am not finding fault with the men appointed. What I am endeavouring to prove is that Mr. Tiffin was an employee of another railway, from which he was taken and put on the Intercolonial. He was not promoted from the Intercolonial, except that when the Board was formed he was then made a member of the Board. Thus that very prominent position into which Mr. Tiffin was placed at first could have been filled, if the hon. members opposite are correct, toy a promotion from the Intercolonial. But that was not done. Mr. Caron was put on because he was a French-Canadian. There is no objection to that; that is perfectly right. But does the hon. member mean to say, when he interjects that remark, that along the Intercolonial from Montreal to Sydney, where there are hundreds, yes thousands, of French-Cana-dian employees who have served the road from boyhood up, there was not a man on the Intercolonial qualified to sit on that Board, and that it was necessary to go to the province of Ontario and take a man from the city of Ottawa?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

My hon. friend's memory is at fault again. He means well, but he overlooks the chief fact. At that time the law was changed; what had never been done before was done then. An Act was passed allowing claimants against the Intercolonial up to a certain amount to sue the Government without going through the Exchequer Court. Mr. Caron, being a lawyer, was placed on the Board for the purpose of managing these cases at short range instead of at long range. Every employee on the Intercolonial could not have done that.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
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April 25, 1917