April 25, 1917

LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

That is how the through traffic is operated.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

My hon. friend knows much better than I that the operation of the National Transcontinental between Quebec and Moncton has not paid its operating costs.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

If my hon. friend will make inquiry he will find that every day during the past year a large number of trains containing fifty, sixty and sometimes seventy oars, pass over the Transcontinental.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

The more trains the greater the deficit on that line.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

The grade is twice as low as on the Intercolonial.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

I thought my hon. friend knew enough about railway matters to know that the greater the number of trains on that section of the Transcontinental the greater the deficit. It is through traffic, and all it gets is its proportion of the through rate, and the through rate has to be so low that the carriage of the traffic over that road means a deficit every time a wheel is turned.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Is my hon. friend not aware that the reason why the Intercolonial authorities have carried such an enormous proportion of the traffic over the Transcontinental is because of its low grades? One locomotive can haul so many more cars than on the Intercolonial.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

That is the lowest-grade argument I have heard for a long time. My hon. friend is mistaken.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Will my hon. friend answer my question?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

Yes I will, promptly. It is not so.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

And the hon. member for St. John knows that on that portion of the Transcontinental between Quebec and Moncton the traffic has not paid the operating costs, outside altogether of a single cent of interest on the enormous investment made, and that in the opinion of the best railway experts on the American continent this country would be well served is that there has been no politics in the In-another part of Canada.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Does the hon. gentleman deny that vast quantities of freight have been carried by the Intercolonial authorities of the Transcontinental?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

I say this, and I desire to say it as strongly as I can, that to the extent to which that line could be used, it has been used to keep the rails from rusting; that is the position.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

The hon. member had

better go over that road once, and he would then change his opinion.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

The road travels through territory served by that distinguished servant of the State, the hon. member from 'Carleton, and so it must be a good .one.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

I have seen trains on

the Transcontinental pulling seventy-five loaded cars, and as many as ten such trains a day. On the Intercolonial you cannot pull thirty cars with the best engine you have.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

I am sorry the

hon. gentleman can count so well on the Transcontinental, and that his vision is s.o obscured on the Intercolonial.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Go over the road and

find out for yourself. You don't know now.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. B. BENNETT:

I have seen trains on the Intercolonial with more than thirty or fifty cars. But of course one has a double vision when the traffic is travelling upon one's own pet railway, and a little political capital can be made out of it. The hon. member for Carleton knows as well as any man living, that the r.oad has not justified its existence, in view of the capital expenditure involved in its construction, and never will so far as the present generation is concerned, and that the best masters of American transporation declare not only that the rails should never have been laid, but that they should now be taken up and laid somewhere else where they could be used profitably.

One word about political patronage. As an humble member of the Conservative party ever since the day I was able to think, I go down to the lower provinces occasionally, and the one bitter complaint I have always heard since the year 1911 when the present Government took charge, is that there has been no politics in the intercolonial.

It is the old game on the part of the Liberal party-to charge political administration of the Intercolonial and thus draw a red herring across the trail, while they keep their friends in office on the road. It is so everywhere. It has been so since this war began. They denounce the Tories for putting Tories into office, but when you analyze the facts you will find that the Grits have the jobs, and their friends seek to keep them there by denouncing the Tories for using patronage. It is one of the cleverest schemes of hon. gentlemen opposite. But, on the other hand, you find Tories condemning the management of the Intercolonial for leaving the Liberals in their positions. Down in Moncton and in Westmorland 'how did they vote? Did they vote condemnation of the Government? No. They voted because they were Liberals left over from 1911.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS-PROMOTION OF EMPLOYEES.
Permalink

April 25, 1917