February 1, 1917

LIB

Archibald Blake McCoig

Liberal

Mr. McCOIG:

I draw the attention of

the Government to an article that appeared in one of to-day's papers. It is headed "Congestion of Grain in West becomes serious," and reads:

-Saskatoon, Jan. 30.-Crain congestion in the West has reached a serious condition, in the opinion of J. R. Wilson, superintendent of the Dominion Government elevator here, who declares that unquestionably there is far more grain in the country than anyone had any idea of at harvest time.

With the embargos against inward shipments to Port Arthur, Fort William, Saskatoon and Moosejaw, it is little use for either farmers or Interior elevators to receive cars for there is no place to route them to.

My reason for calling this matter to the attention of the Government is that during the past year there has been a great shortage of feed throughout the province of Ontario, and in many cases hundreds of cattle and hogs have been taken to market before being brought to a fit condition for selling. To-day, there are no doubt hundreds of cattle and hogs that should be retained for feeding purposes that, on account of the shortage of feed, are being slaughtered, and this will greatly affect the meat situation next year. If the Government can remove the embargo and allow

grain to be brought into Ontario, their action will be greatly appreciated by men who are anxious to comply with the Government's request for the greatest possible production in the coming year.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE.
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY HON. P. E. BLONDIN.
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

The -despatch

which the hon. gentleman has read contains information most of which I apprehend to be the facts. Part of it is not disagreeable information, as it tells ns that the Northwest, on the ultimate revision of its output, dhows a m-ucth larger yield of grain than we had heretofore thought would have been turned out. That, as far as it goes, is useful and very agreeable information. As regards the car congestion, there is probably not a foot of ground on the North American continent where congestion is not very strong and very pressing, and causing a variety of hardships. The railways have to impose embargos when it is necessary, and I am quite certain they do not put on any embargos when it is not absolutely necessary. If my hon. friend can point out any way by wthioh the car shortage can be diminished in its pressure upon the industries and upon the traffic of the country, we would be very glad to have hi-s suggestions. The railroad companies are doing everything they possibly can. and the Board of Railway Commissioners is using the powers at its command in order to ameliorate the situation as far as possible. But the situation is a pressing one, and we shall simply have to hear what we cannot get rid of by any reasonable means.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE.
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY HON. P. E. BLONDIN.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Is there not a Common Carriers' Act that requires the railway companies to take goods for shipment to destination according to the order of the owner?

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE.
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY HON. P. E. BLONDIN.
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

My hon. friend the Minister of Railways can answer that better than I can.

Mr, COCHRANE: I do not know whether the Act covers that or not, but I know that both the railway companies and the Board of Railway Commissioners are doing everything in their power to get the freight delivered.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE.
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY HON. P. E. BLONDIN.
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WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.

INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Just before the close of the last session an order was passed by this House calling for a return of all purchases made by the War Purchasing Commission.

A few day ago I inquired of the clerk of records and I found that, so far as he knew, this return had not been brought down. I made no remarks about it, as I assumed that we should have the auditor general's report in our hands and that it would cover at least a portion of the information required. Now, we have received the information from the Minister of Finance that that portion of the auditor general's report covering the transactions of the War Purchasing Commission will not be available until after the adjournment. I would like to know if the Minister of Militia cannot have that return brought down, before we adjourn next week?

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
Permalink
CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

A few days ago there was laid upon the table of the House a report of the War Purchasing Commission in four large volumes. Was my hon. friend aware of that?

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

That is not a compliance with the order of the House which required a statement of the purchases. My hon. friend the Minister of Militia, who was then Acting Minister of Militia, will remember that we discussed the matter on a number of occasions, and that finally the House ordered that the report be given. I think that, an order of the House having been passed, we are entitled to the information.

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

It is certainly correct for the hon. gentleman to say that any order of this House must be honoured. The idea, however, was that, as the report which was being published would contain such a tremendous amount of detail, there would be sufficient information in it to answer my hon. friend's purpose. Moreover, the auditor general's report would be forthcoming, and between the two reports all the information would be given that would be desirable. The report which my hon. friend asked for was one of tremendous detail, and the department was so busy that it seemed almost impossible to get the work out. In view of the report of the IVar Purchasing Commission and the report of the auditor general giving practically all the information asked for in the order of the House, I hope my hon. friend will be willing not'to insist upon the labour being expended that will be necessary to get out the return for which he has asked.

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

I suppose I have no

right to discuss the .matter at this stage, and I do not intend to do so. I ought, however, be allowed to say that I think the minister has not treated the House exactly as he

should, in view of the somewhat extended conversation we had about the matter during the months of April and May last.

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

I may add that I was acting-Minister at the time-for about two months, I think. After that I was not in control of the Department of Militia and Defence, and consequently was unable to follow the matter up in the way my hon. friend thinks it should have been followed up.

Topic:   WAR PURCHASING CJOMMISSON.
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PURCHASES.
Permalink

WESTERN COAL MINING.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

William Ashbury Buchanan

Liberal

Mr. BUCHANAN:

In the papers this morning there is a despatch from Lethbridge concerning the situation with regard to the coal supply. The fear is expressed that unless the trouble between the miners and the operators is immediately settled there will be considerable suffering, because many communities are practically without coal. The Minister of Labour has gone to the West in an effort to bring about a settlement; has the Government had any report from him as to the, progress of the negotiations?

Topic:   WESTERN COAL MINING.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Telegrams received yesterday and the day before indicate that the men in some of the mines have returned to work. I think the men at the Blairmore mine had not returned to work, but were in session discussing the situation at that particular mine, according to the last report which I have received. I am not aware that we have had any direct report from the Minister of Labour. The reports to which I refer are those which have come to the officials of the Department of Labour from representatives of that department in the districts to which my hon. friend has referred.

Topic:   WESTERN COAL MINING.
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HON. DR. BELAND, M.P.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

February 1, 1917