January 26, 1917

LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

What more can my hon. friend want? The Government now know how they can get the authority, and they can act accordingly.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Why will the hon. gentleman not give it now?

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

Simply because I do

not choose to satisfy the curiosity of my hon. friend at this moment; that is all. Let my hon. friend, who is one of the big men of the Government come forward with his committee, and I will get all the information he wants, and more than he wants along that line.'

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CON

William Sora Middlebro

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MIDDLEBRO:

My hon. friend is

surely not ashamed of his authority; he is surely not ashamed of the newspaper from which he is reading, if he is reading from a newspaper.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

Did I hear my hon.

friend rightly?

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CON

William Sora Middlebro

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MIDDLEBRO:

I take it that my

hon. friend is reading from some newspaper report of the meeting he speaks of. Snrely he is not ashamed to give the name of the newspaper.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

I always like to satisfy

a moderate man when I can, and I am going to satisfy my hon. friend right now by telling him that I am not reading from any newspaper.

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

I said a moment ago

that the reason for the alliance between the Nationalists and the Government was that the Government were perfectly satisfied. I know that my hon. friend, the Minister of Public Works, will in his heart agree with me because, as he says, he knows something about elections.

I suppose the Government felt that they were not able to carry the country on what I might call their domestic record-their record in connection with carrying on the affairs of Canada. You will remember that the present Prime Minister thought that the late Government were extremely extravagant, and promised all sorts o.f economies.

I am not going into that question to-night, because I have taken up a lot of time already and that question can, and will come up for discussion later on. But, I may say, shortly, that the record of the Borden Government from September, 1911, to the present time has been a record of broken promises from first to last with one single exception. Of all planks in the platform issued by the leader of the Government prior to the election of 1911 there has only been one carried out. Therefore, my [DOT] right hon. friend the Prime Minister and his friends know perfectly well that it would be ridiculous to appeal to the country on their record, or on the plea that they have carried out their promises. Have they done any better in carrying out the part which Canada has taken in the war? I heard my hon. friend from Westmorland (Mr. Copp) speak about the two hundred lieutenant-colonels who were in England, who have been in England from the time that the first contingent went over, who are there yet drawing salaries and incurring expenses costing the country about 81,000,000 per annum, and the country is getting absolutely nothing for it. My hon. friend only dealt with the lieutenant-colonels. What

about the majors? We have some of them back, I see.

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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY:

I would like to know

where the hon- gentleman gets his information when he says that there are 200 lieu-tenanhcolonels in England. That means two hundred battalions and 200,000 men. It is absolutely absurd.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

We have lieutenant-colonels who are not with battalions.

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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY:

That is rot.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

We have more lieutenant-colonels than battalions over there.

Mr- BRADBURY: No, you have not.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

Yes, we have; my hon. friend is not such a good military man that he knows everything. Very many battalions went over with lieutenant-colonels at their head and these lieutenant-colonels are still in England. The - lieutenant-colonel who went over with the battalion is still in England and another lieutenant-colonel has been appointed to do the fighting.

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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY:

That is not right.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

To-day you have more lieutenant-colonels than battalions over there. But, what about the majors and captains? The Prime Minister said that there were 2,700 men alone in the Pay and Records Office besides the hundreds of clerks hired in England to do the work; these 2,700 majors, captains, lieutenants and a gang that are no good for war purposes are hanging on to the skirts of the Government, the idea being to spend the money of Canada, and it is not $1,000,000, as my hon. friend from Westmorland said, but many millions of dollars a year that are being absolutely squandered and wasted for that very purpose. In addition to that, my information is that there are 30,000 men, privates, corporals and ser-

9 p.m. geants, in Great Britain to-day who are unfit to be sent across the channel to the firing line. What does that mean? It means that these 30,000 men cost this country at least $30,000,000 by the time they were landed in Great Britain. It means that since they have been landed in Great Britain another $30,000,000 of Canadian money has been expended'; What are they doing?-nothing at all. They cannot be sent to the front; they are too old, or too cripled, or too young; they are men who never ought to have been enlisted at all. I say, with all due respect to many excellent physicians and doctors throughout

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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

A million and a half.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

We are spending over a million dollars a day in Canada.

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

Not in Canada.

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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF:

In England for what Canada is supplying to the soldiers in England? But when the soldiers go across the water, as I understand it, the British War Office supplies the food, the uniforms, everything that the soldiers in France and Flanders use. It may be that that only amounts to a million and a half a day. My hon. friend may be right. But that is what I want to know, and I would like to have the Finance Minister, if he has the facts, give us, a statement showing approximately, if he cannot show exactly, how much a day the war is costing us over and above what Canada is paying at the present time. I think it will be found to be a very large sum. The Minister of Militia (Mr. Kemp) is now in his place, and possibly he might be able to give' that information approximately. I can quite easily understand that he has not the exact figures. But if he or the Minister of Finance will give us that information at a later day I for one would appreciate it very much.

I was surprised when the Prime Minister took the position he did concerning the extension of the life of Parliament. He spoke of the disadvantages of holding an election during the war. There would be disadvantages for the Government-I quite appreciate that. But what right has the Government to come forward with that plea now? War broke out on the 4th of August,

1914, and a special session was called to [DOT] open on the 18th, which session lasted far five days. During that session my right hon. leader (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) and every member on this side of the House joined in with the Government and voted all the money the Government asked in order to carry on the war. My right hon. leader had a number of engagements to hold meetings; he cancelled them all. It is true that no formal political truce was made, as the hon. Minister of Militia stated at a meeting in his constituency, but there was a tacit abandonment of partisan activity-on the part of the Liberals, at all events. However, during that time hon. gentlemen opposite were preparing and 'Sending out the most atrocious partisan literature ever sent out under the stamp of a member. This was done at the very time when they were saying: We must all join together, we must put the whole force of the country behind the Government in carrying on properly our share in the war. The circulation of this literature by hundreds of thousands of. copies went on during September, October and November, 1914. It i3 not often that my hon. friend who is leading the House (Mr. Rogers) slips a cog, but he did it on that occasion. This literature was supposed to be sent out privately; but the West was flooded with it-and it was dated. If anybody questions the time, I have the goods and can show them.

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January 26, 1917