May 18, 1916

EXTENSION OF TERM OF PARLIAMENT.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT RORDEN:

Mr. Speaker, I

sent a telegram, through His Royal Highness the Governor General, to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in regard to the position of the Bill to extend the life of this Parliament one year. The telegram was sent two days ago, but I have not yet received a reply. However, I have a memorandum from the law clerk of the House of Commons, who states that he'has just received a copy of the Bill, and that it was introduced into the Imperial House of Commons by the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the 3rd day of May.

Topic:   EXTENSION OF TERM OF PARLIAMENT.
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AGRICULTURAL LABOUR.

SOLDIERS FOR SEEDING AND PLOUGHING. '

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I have a memorandum from the Deputy Minister of Militia

and Defence showing, for each military district, the number of members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force on leave of absence for seeding and ploughing. The total number of those so reported to be on leave of absence is 18,506. The details are as follows:

Number of Members of the C.E.P. on Leave of

Absence for Seeding and Ploughing. '

Date of

Military District. Number reports.No. 1 . 1,975 13-5-16No. 2 . 3,500 12-5-16No. 3 . 396 13-5-16No. 4 . 27 13-5-16No. 5 . 3 13.5-16No. 6 . 2,285 16-5-16No. 10 . 5,445 13-5-16No. 11 . 375 15-5-16No. 13 . 4,500 12-5-16Total . 18,506

Topic:   AGRICULTURAL LABOUR.
Subtopic:   SOLDIERS FOR SEEDING AND PLOUGHING. '
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CANADIAN ARMY DENTAL CORPS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I had a memorandum handed to me at my request by the Director General of the Dental Service of the Canadian Expeditionary Force which I thought would be of some interest to the members of the House. I believe that Canada is the second nation in the world which has adopted the proposal to establish such a service. According to this report, Germany first established such an organization in connection with her army and Canada was the first to follow in that regard. The memorandum is as follows:

Report on Canadian Army Dental Corps.

Organized less than a year ago, without precedent to guide its footsteps, and with a total at that time of 57, this organization has now grown to practically one thousand all told. So great and various are its ramifications today that, in that short time the need for its existence has been amply demonstrated. Its clinics ' and laboratories extend all the way from Vancouver Island on the West, all over the Dominion of Canada to Bermuda across the seas to Cairo and Alexandria in Egypt, to Salonika in Greece over France and Belgium wherever Canadian troops are to be found and also in England wherever Canadian troops are stationed.

Its officers and men'are found not only with the various regiments but hospitals, field ambulances, ammunition columns, C.A.S.C., and all other units, are provided for as fast as men can be despatched and accommodated for these various units.

To provide men, equipment, supplies and administrative operation for a field geographically as large as the one over which our services extend, and at the same time perform nearly one half million operations of a dental nature, is a task of which any corps might be proud.

The number of operations performed may or may not be an index to the value of services * rendered, but the supreme test is efficiency ; and to be able to say without fear of contradiction that the efficiency of a man or a battalion is

greater as a result of these services is what is demanded. , Tried by this exacting standard, what do we find? We find that over 50,000 men now doing splendid service for their country and Empire owe their presence there to-day to the services rendered by the Canadian Army Dental. Corps.

In addition jto this there is the huge task of keeping fit, dentally, men who are already in the service and are constantly needing attention. Over 10 per cent of an army are unfit for active service ail the time owing to dental troubles, and the economic loss thus entailed in an army of only 100,000 men is tremendous, for here you would have an army of 10,000 out of action all the time on account of these very troubles.

A service that can reduce this to the irreducible minimum and keep these men in the trenches with the least possible loss in time and expense, consistent with efficiciency is doing a very real service.

Experience is teaching us that the nearer we can place our operators to the front with the greater despatch can we carry out all ordinary operations, thus saving many days loss which is occasioned by not allowing our officers up close to the firing line. They can in many cases be accomplished with two days' loss what under the present method entails from ten days to two weeks absence of the soldier from his post. This is a very vital matter for it is most important that a highly trained man whose services are valuable, shall be kept in service with the least possible loss of time.

Nothing so soon unfits a man for service as tooth troubles and nothing is more sensitive to trench life if trouble exist, than the teeth; and as a consequence the morale of troops is barometrically high or low in proportion to the state of their teeth.

Under a new establishment the C.A.D.C. will now have the services of a purely scientific dental officer whose whole time will be devoted to scientific research work which our experience has convinced us is necessary.

That part of the service whose duty it is and will be for years to come, to care for, and make fit dentally the soldiers of the casualty branch has an important service to perform.

Here, highly skilled and efficient dental surgeons of experience are needed, and more inducement in the way of rank is needed that the service become sufficiently attractive to this type- of practitioner. We are doing the best we can at present, but are not able to do the service we would like as we lack the experienced men.

The Canadian Army Dental Corps has many shortcomings and has made mistakes; but who hasn't in this war?

The Germans in this as in other matters saw the necessity and prudence of organizing and equipping every unit of energy making for efficiency and not least on their list is their army dental corps. [DOT]

We are not the first in the field, but are a close second and will we hope at the close of the war demonstrate our right to the first position from an humanitarian point of view.

(Sgd.) N. B. Clayton, Major,

Director General Dental Services.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY DENTAL CORPS.
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MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.

PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Mr. Speaker,

the hon. member for Rouville (Mr. Le-

mieux), during my absence the other day, referred to the desirability of having a greater number of copies of the evidence taken before the Royal Commission known as the Meredith-Duff Commission. The matter stands in this way: It was suggested that it would be more convenient, and very little more expensive, to have copies of the evidence printed rather than to have a large number typewritten. That was arranged and, I think, 100 copies have been printed daily up to the present time.

I have a memorandum from the King's Printer who states that there is no order of the House for the printing of the report, but the King's Printer, on his own responsibility, gave orders to strike off a few additional copies scr as to supply the leaders in both Houses. However, the matter is in type and it is being held awaiting action.

I would think it proper, that, without any definite order from Parliament, a sufficient number might be struck off to enable all the members of the Senate and House of Commons to be supplied with copies. If that is the desire of the hon. members, and if there is no objection to it, an arrangement will be made accordingly. I shall inquire whether or not it would be possible to supply copies of the evidence already taken. As the type is standing perhaps it might be done.

Topic:   MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.
Subtopic:   PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Knowing what that

means, there will not be much difficulty in doing that if the type is standing. I would like to ask if the same course will be followed in connection with the evidence taken by the Davidson Commission.

Topic:   MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.
Subtopic:   PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

As far as I am aware, the evidence has not been printed in that case. However, I shall make inquiry, and if it is being printed, so that it can be distributed, there would be no objection to that. .

Topic:   MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.
Subtopic:   PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

If the evidence has not been printed heretofore, I would suggest the advisability of having it printed now, and sending it out with the copies of the -other.

Topic:   MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.
Subtopic:   PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I will consult

with my hon. friend the Minister of Justice (Mr. Doherty) and give my hon. friend's suggestion consideration.

Topic:   MEREDITH-DUFF - AND DAVIDSON COMMISSIONS.
Subtopic:   PRINTED COPIES OP EVIDENCE.
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APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.

CON

Auguste-Charles-Philippe-Robert Landry (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the House that I have directed the

Clerk of the House to lay upon the Table his report and my recommendation in the matter of the promotion of Mr. T. P. Owens to the position of Editor of Debates and chief of the reporting branch of the House, and in the matter of the confirmation of the title of Mr. W. H. Dickson as " Chief Keporter of the Committees of the House." .The recommendation of the clerk of the House is as follows:

Ottawa, May 18, 1916.

The Hon.,

The Speaker of the House of Commons, Ottawa.

Sir,

The transfer of Mr. Albert Horton to the Senate Debates Staff creates a vacancy in the position of Editor and Chief of Reporting Branch of the House of Commons.

I beg to report that Mr. T. P. Owens, Associate Editor, is the proper person to be promoted to the position of Editor of Debates and Chief of Reporting Branch of the House of Commons.

I also beg to report that Mr. W. H. Dickson, who has been acting as Chief Reporter of the Committees of the House with the approval of the Speaker since 1906, should have the said title officially confirmed.

I am, Sir,

Your obedient servant,

(Sgd.) THOS. B. FLINT, Clerk of the House of Commons.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN moved:

That the recommendation of His Honour the Speaker of the House of Commons with reference to the promotion of Mr. T, P. Owens as Editor of Debates and Chief of the Reporting Branch of the House, and the official title of Mr. W. H. Dickson as Chief Reporter of the Committees of the House be confirmed.

Ha said: The memorandum placed in my hands informs me that the promotion referred to in this motion, and in the recommendation of His Honour the Speaker, and the confirmation of Mr. Dickson's title, involves no change in grading and no expenditure or charge of any kind. The proposal is merely the confirmation of a change and of a. title.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.
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LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

I have no objection to either of their appointments. I have had the pleasure of knowing these gentlemen for a great many years, and I know they are very competent for the positions. But I would just like to say that in this arrangement the Debates Committee seems to have been overlooked entirely. The organization of the branch took place on the recommendation of the Debates Committee. I do not desire to precipitate a debate or to prolong the session, for the . purpose of having a meeting of the Debates Committee, but I think that when we have

a Debates Committee, when appointments of this kind are to be made, its existence^ should not he overlooked.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I was not aware as to the origin of the proposal. As I understand my hon. friend, the proposition did originate with the Debates Committee.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.
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LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

Yes, the organization

originated on the recommendation of the Debates Committee. I am .merely calling attention to it, because this committee does exist for soma purpose or it does not. If it exists for any purpose, it might be well hereafter that it should be asked formally to agree to these matters.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF EDITOR OF DEBATES.
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May 18, 1916