May 12, 1916

CON
IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

It is worth while

trying to do, and I would sooner try that than go on under the present system. I will trust Canadians every day. I would like to see the hon. member, who challenges the integrity of his fellow countrymen

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. B. BENNETT:

I repudiate the observation. I did not challenge the integrity of my fellow countrymen. What I said was that, unfortunately, you cannot take the roads out of politics simply by saying so.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

I adjust myself to the orientation of my hon. friend from Calgary. I have no hesitation in saying that I would nationalize these roads, and I would get

Canadians to administer them and to remedy these evils for the benefit of the Canadian people.

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

Does not my hon. friend think that those men whom he would name would be the kings of Canada?

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

Three wise men came from the East, and Heaven be thanked that they recognized something on a certain day in the history of the world, and brought frankincense and myrrhi.

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LIB
IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

Would the hon. gentleman like to be one? He is looking for a job, it is said.

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LIB
IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

There are plenty of wise men in this country, some of whom are supposed to come from the East, and some of whom are in the West. The finest type of man and woman that the world has ever seen is in this day and generation growing up in this country of ours. In my personal acquaintance of the last year or two I have never seen a finer type of youth than the genuine Canadian boys whom I know in my own city and in my own township who are going to the front. The spirit of sacrifice and fidelity and patriotism shown by those boys is what gives me confidence that the Canadian people can run these railroads to the advantage of the nation. I could speak for a week on this subject-

Some hon. MEMBEES: Go on.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

No. I do not intend to say mueh more. I am so convinced that this is the psychological moment for the. nationalization of the railways of Canada that I think Parliament ought -at once to instruct the Government to carry out that project, because the Government can do anything. I wish to warn the Government of the great danger they are in of not seizing the psychological moment to deal with this question. An election is not far away, and there is a temptation to these railway magnates that we know to butt into that election, and if the psychological moment has arrived to absorb the railways, to head it off. I hope the right hon. leader of the Opposition, who is the father of the Grand Trunk Pacific, sees the error of the father, and that he is prepared to assist the Govern-

ment in carrying out this project. There would, of course, be a great temptation to him, as he may have a political triumph ahead of him in the coming election-no one knows what is going to happen in an election-to come hack with a programme to restore and carry out the original intention of the Grand Trunk Pacific and the old Grand Trunk and to put them in competition with all the other lines. I do not want to see that, I would like to see both sides of the House do their best to prevent that and deal with this question now. The key of the situation is to take over one railroad-I do not care which one you take if you get a transcontinental system. The Canadian Northern joined up with the Intercolonial and the Transcontinental would be a splendid transcontinental system; it would touch every point but that part of the province of Ontario west of Toronto, and that part is full of railroads.

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CON
IND
LIB

Edward Walter Nesbitt

Liberal

Mr. NESBITT:

I am very interested

in this discussion, and before you go into that, I would like to know what form of commission you would suggest in order to take it out of politics and party patronage.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

I would take it out of

politics, and the people of Canada would see that the men whom they sent to Parliament and the men whom they entrusted with this work would be kept out of politics. . Public men can he disciplined. The people of this country from this time on are going to discipline their public men. In England they are to-day making their public men walk the plank if they do not do as the people' wish. Every hon. mem-*ber here to-day knows that he is under, the eye of his constituents and subject to their discipline more than he ever was before. The public conscience is aroused; public duty is demanded; consecration of service is demanded and the people will insist on getting that and they will get it. If the leaders of the people advise the people aright, all well and good; if they do not advise the people aright, the people will take the matter into their own hands. In regard to duplication of service, Sir Adam Beck has petitioned this Parliament to aid certain lines that he has in hand in Ontario.

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?

Mr. MOBPK Y@

He says that he does not want any aid.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

He has petitioned this

Parliament and he proposes to foui'ld certain lines. In order to work out salvation as he views it, Sir Adam Beck wants to duplicate a line in the province of Ontario. My contention is that we have there all the railroads that are required. When I said that the Canadian Northern had no lines west of Toronto, I knew, of course, that we could take running Tights over existing roads in that part of Ontario, and in that way make out of the Intercolonial, the Transcontinental and the Canadian Northern a splendid transcontinental system, by which we would get into every part of this country. That system with the Grand Trunk linked up to it would make a magnificent railroad. The best transcontinental system of all, of course, would be the Canadian Pacific joined up to the Transcontinental and the Intercolonial, and I would be willing to make very liberal terms with the Canadian Pacific Bailway Company in order to carry out a project of that kind.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. B. BENNETT:

The branch lines of the Canadian Pacific are better, hut its main line is not as good.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

The Canadian Pacific is better in Quebec, where railroading started in Canada. The most extravagant of all proposals is this proposal of unnecessary duplication of terminals in Canada. I first want to deal with terminal seaports, and we have room in Canada for seaports at Halifax and St. John and also at Quebec and Montreal. We cannot afford at the present time to have great seaports and all the terminal facilities that go with great seaports in connection with four ot more cities, but we could have one, two, or three. We could start with one at the best seaport on the continent of North America, and that seaport should be under the British flag. We are making Halifax a seaport; St. John is here as a suppliant in connection with her port, and she is getting something; we are making Montreal a great port, and, in fact, almost all those seaports could be justified.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. B. BENNETT:

Halifax will be

the best harbour in the world when present contemplated improvements are completed.

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May 12, 1916