May 3, 1916

CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

I am coming to that. I was with the hon. gentleman; I thought he made a very good point there. I understand that under the wise administration of this Government a surplus is at last in sight on this great railroad instead of the usual deficit. I do not think it is altogether fair for the Government to claim that surplus if it was gained at the expense of the working-man. I am inclined to agree with the hon. gentleman. In these times when everything a man has to use in daily life is higher in price, and especially now, that the road is on a better basis through the unfortunate circumstance of the war, resulting in increased traffic, it might be a time for the Government to repeat its generosity to the men. I am not saying that they have been too generous. I think the Government -are to be commended inasmuch as they made that advance to the men, apparently, without any request being made for it. That, it seems to me, shows an advance in sentiment on this subject for which the Government is to be commended instead of condemned. If the road through the connections made, and also through the fact of these seventy-five engines having been taken to swell the traffic of the road which otherwise would not have been received, these matters should be considered. I do not think the hon. gentleman made a strong .point when he instanced the case of one car of lumber-a purely isolated case. Perhaps the man did not give the right address and the car is now lying in Toronto.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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LIB
CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

I have heard it said that when a man goes around declaring that he is extremely honest, it is better to watch him. I do not think the reflection comes with good grace from my hon. friend when he assumes that a oar going into Ontario will be " collared." I believe that the people of Ontario are as honest, or nearly so, as those of other parts of the country. As to this question of running the train, I am not in a position to discuss it, but I thought the hon. gentleman's argument weak. The Government out the train off because past experience showed that it did not pay, and to cut off the train meant to save money for the people. And the hon.

gentleman had the Canadian Pacific railway to fall back upon, so he did not suffer, anything. v

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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CON
CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

Members of Parliament, so far as that is concerned, may well be asked to make a little sacrifice for the country. The Government might consider the personal loss to the hon. gentleman, but that question and the question of the labouring men are the only points on which I could agree with him.

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LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

It is hardly fair for the hon. gentleman to say that I referred to the case for any personal reason. I used it only for an illustration.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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CON
LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

I did not think any hon. member would take that view of it.

Progress reported.

On motion of Mr. Reid, the House adjourned at 11.39 p.m.

Thursday, May 4, 1916.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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May 3, 1916