May 2, 1916

CON
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

When I was minister we had dredges at work there and a very nice breakwater was built out at the island.

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CON
LIB
CON

Angus Claude Macdonell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MACDONELL:

Of course, it was

needed. Public property was being washed away and the breakwater served a good purpose in the past but there was no real dealing with Toronto harbour in a serious way.

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LIB
CON

Angus Claude Macdonell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MACDONELL:

Merely to protect it but not to develop it. Now, the local harbour commission have taken the matter in hand and they are proceeding to spend a very large amount of money-quite the amount of money that -was mentioned by the hon. member for Oxford (Mr. Nesbitt). This Government money is being strictly expended on harbour work. The Toronto Harbour Commission is paying out an immense amount of money, part of it on real harbour work that is generally done by the Government and part of it on collateral, adjacent works that altogether will comprise the completed Toronto harbour. The Government is not doing more than its share. The harbour commission, locally, is spending many millions of dollars on real harbour work. The opening of the Welland canal will make it necessary to have some great port on lake Ontario. That is why the trade has heretofore gone by American channels and through American harbours. Buffalo gets a very large proportion of the entire freight of the upper lakes. When this new work is completed it is expected that a very great portion of this traffic will come to Kingston, Toronto and other ports on

lake Ontario. This work is essential and is being carried out in a proper manner. The Toronto people, through their harbour commission, are spending many millions of dollars, and when the work is completed we shall have a harbour that will be equal if not superior to any on the American continent. It is expected that the work Will be completed about the same time as the Welland canal, if not before. With regard to harbour dues, which have been mentioned to-night, all the docks, shipping facilities and privileges of Toronto harbour will be vested in the harbour commission, and there will be no possibility, as the hon. member for Guysborough suggests, of a boat tieing up at A's dock or at B's dock and being charged dues at a more or less arbitrary rate, which, I suppose, is what the hon. gentleman had in mind. All the docking facilities "will be under the harbour commission, and their charges are under the regulation and supervision of the Dominion Government. As has been stated by some hon. gentlemen, the harbour commissioners of Montreal, of Quebec, and of Toronto are under different Acts of Parliament, and their powers vary. In the case of the Toronto Harbour Commission the Government has the selection of one commissioner, and the nomination of another at the suggestion of the Toronto Board of Trade. The Toronto Harbour Commission is really a Government commission. All harbour regulations, dues and charges must be either fixed by the Government or be submitted to them and receive their approval. In view of these facts harbour conditions at Toronto will very shortly be almost ideal.

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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Under the late Government, and before I was a member of it, I was taken to Toronto to be shown what the Government was doing there. It must be remembered by hon. gentlemen who do not know the great city of Toronto that the harbour is protected by an island which forms a natural bay or harbour. The difficulty has been with what are known as the eastern and western gaps, which are entrances to the harbour. The late Government spent a large amount of money in building breakwaters to prevent the island shore beiing washed away, and also a large amount in completing the eastern and western gaps. The entrances to the harbour are now in good condition, but it must be admitted that for years Toronto harbour was not looked after either by the city or by anybody else, and it has been notorious

among shipping men for having perhaps the poorest loading and unloading facilities of any harbour in the Dominion. Outside of the traffic to which the hon. member for Toronto has referred, Toronto is a great distributing centre for all the freight that comes by water, and that will come more and more from that whole inland country of Ontario as the harbour facilities are developed. I am strongly in favour of this vote, and I would suggest to the minister that we pass this Toronto item and then adjourn.

Progress reported

On motipn of Mr. Rogers, the House adjourned at 11.35 p.m.

Wednesday, May 3, 1916.

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May 2, 1916