May 2, 1916

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

A few of us.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Does my hon. friend mean that the Legislature met earlier in the day?

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

We met at exactly the same hours and I think the business went through just as rapidly. Possibly some of us did not speak at so great a length as we do now. At all events, the business wenit through, and the session was no longer than when we were accustomed to sitting every night.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

You had no Maritime

Province affairs to deal with.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

If we could get into a reasonable frame of mind in regard to business, and possibly cut out some matters of rather a trivial character that are frequently brought up and consume a good deal of time, I daresay the proposal of my right hon. friend might result as he anticipates; but of course the number of members in this House is very much greater than the number in the Ontario House, and members naturally have regard to their usefulness and the importance of the constituencies which they represent. I am afraid it would be rather difficult to get through the business of the session by sitting only between the hours of three and six. In the United States they meet in the forenoon.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

They meet at twelve o'clock.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

And I do not believe they sit in the evening, as a rule.

. Sir WILFRID LAURIER: Very seldom. The hours are from twelve to six.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

If any such consummation as that could be brought about, I am sure that no one in the House would welcome it more warmly than I should, because, while very late sessions are trying upon all members of the House, and especially upon those who remain to the end, they

are naturally more trying upon members of the Administration than upon any other members of the House, as my hon. friend from South Renfrew will have realized during the time he was a member of the late Administration. I shall be very glad to consider what he has in mind, and if it should be thought desirable that we should meet earlier in the day, and hold committee meetings in the evenings, as far as I personally am concerned, I shall be very glad to try the experiment.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

If the House does not sit, at night there is no reason why the committees should not meet earlier in the morning, or why the business of the House should not be transacted between two and six in the afternoon. Experience has shown that the afternoon sittings are the ones at which most business is done, and if the evening sittings were cuit out the committees could meet at nine-thirty or ten in the morning, and get through by twelve or half-past, and the House could meet at two and go on till six or even seven, if necessary.

Motion amended as proposed, agreed to.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
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PRIVILEGE.

MR. KYTE'S SOURCE OF INFORMATION.


On the Orders of the Day: Mr; KYTE: I desire to say a word or two on a question of privilege. I notice in the Montreal Gazette of to-day's date the following despatch: A feature of the testimony to he taken by the Royal Commission investigating- the Kyte fuse contract charges which is being awaited with interest in Ottawa is that which will show from what source the member for Richmond obtained the information on which he based his series of allegations as to million dollar commissions. There has been considerable speculation ever since Mr. Kyte's speech, in which he read an alleged contract for the division of huge commissions among Messrs. Yoakum, Cadwell and Bassick, as to the source from which the contract came. It has already been. stated, and has not been denied by the Opposition, that no such contract has ever been executed. It is now understood, however, that information was obtained from a firm of German-American lawyers in New York, and how Mr. Kyte obtained possession of it is the mystery to he solved. That statement is being freely made in the corridors that it was the Arm in question which was the source of his information, and if this is the case it is of interest that the same firm has never had any hesitation in acknowledging its strong pro-German sympathies. If this is brought out in evidence there will be little sympathy for Mr. Kyte in Canada. That article contains two- statements which I desire to contradict in the most 32vt7 emphatic terms. The first is as to whether or not a contract actually existed between Yoakum, Cadwell and Bassick for the division of the 51,000,000. I state most emphatically that ,my information is that a contract signed, sealed and delivered between these parties does exist. As a matter of fact, its existence was not denied by the hon. Minister of Militia and Defence when he made his speech in this House in reply to me. As to the second statement, with respect to the source of my information, I desire to say that my information came from sources as loyal to British interests as those which are associated with the Montreal Gazette. I do not make the statement with any desire to be offensive towards or to impugn the loyalty of any person associated with that newspaper. I think it is important that this denial be placed upon record at the earliest possible moment, and, as the evidence comes before the Royal Commission from day to day, it will be time enough for the Montreal Gazette, or any other newspaper, to comment upon the value of it.


THE BILINGUAL QUESTION.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

In the absence of the hon. member for Kamouraska (Mr. E. Lapointe), I would ask the Minister of Justice if he would kindly complete the return which he has brought down with respect to certain legislation of Ontario re the bilingual schools. The hon. member for Kamouraska would like to have the Order in Council with the report made by the minister upon which it was based, as well as the correspondence exchanged with the Government of the province of Ontario.

Topic:   THE BILINGUAL QUESTION.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I understand that all that I was asked for was the petitions, and they were produced by the Secretary of State. I shall be happy to bring down the Order in Council.

Topic:   THE BILINGUAL QUESTION.
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LIB
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I have not yet seen the Order in Council.

Topic:   THE BILINGUAL QUESTION.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I will bring down the Order in Council, with the report on which it is based. I did not understand it had been asked for.

Topic:   THE BILINGUAL QUESTION.
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May 2, 1916