May 2, 1916

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1916-17.


A message from His Royal Highness the Governor General transmitting Supplementary Estimates for the year ending March 31, 1917, was presented by Sir Thomas White (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the House, and referred to the Committee of Supply.


WAR LOAN-$250,000,000.


Sir ROBERT BORDEN (Acting Minister Militia and Defence) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 97, for granting to His Majesty aid for military and naval defence. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


MILITARY DECORATIONS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

A list of decorations, medals, etc., awarded to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force was received some time ago and a copy of the same was laid on the table of the House on the 12th April. It was afterwards ascertained that the list so received contained certain errors. It was therefore checked-by the Records Office with the London Gazette to the above date, and I lay upon the Table the corrected list.

Topic:   MILITARY DECORATIONS.
Permalink

SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

It has been suggested to me by some hon. gentlemen on both sides of the House that it might be more convenient, and would tend to the equal expedition of business, if, instead of arranging foT morning sessions, the House should meet at two o'clock. I am ready to accept that suggestion if it meets with the approval of the House, and therefore, if there is no objection, I would propose the motion on the Order Paper in that amended form:

That on and after Wednesday next, the third day of May, and until the end of the session, this House shall meet each day at two o'clock in the afternoon.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I understand

that the Government have nothing further to bring down?

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I do not think there is anything more of an important character. There may be one or two trifling measures. I recall to mind possibly a slight amendment to the Exchequer Court Act. It is to meet a difficulty that my right hon. friend encountered-

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

There is no objection at all. Any matters of that kind-would not count. I had in mind important legislation. There have been persistent rumours that the Government was contemplating railway legislation. I see that in the Estimates that have just been placed

upon the Table there are appropriations for the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Northern. I presume this is the legislation the Government had in contemplation, and nothing more.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

That is the legislation contemplated.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

And no more railway legislation of any kind?

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I am not quite sure about that, but if there should be I do not know that meeting at two o'clock would greatly interfere with the discussion of it. Nothing has been decided upon up to the present time.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I understood my right hon. friend to say a moment ago that nothing more of consequence would be brought down-only an amendment to the Exchequer Court Act and things of that character. If that be so, there is nothing more to be said. What I wanted to know was whether we were to expect any more railway legislation of an important character.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Nothing has been decided upon so far. The only thing that has been decided upon is what I mentioned to my rignt' hon. friend a moment ago.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

The motion

'as amended by my right hon. friend is not so objectionable as a motion for morning sittings would have been, but my right hon. friend knows that as a general rule the mornings are not taken until we know what the programme of the Government contains in the way of important legislation. We resort to the morning sittings only when the business remaining to transact is not of a contentious character, though it may be important. At present on the programme of the House there is nothing of any consequence, barring the resolutions which have been brought down to-day and the measure relating to the war loan. As to the war loan there is no contention on our side; it will be scrupulously looked into, but not in any contentious spirit. But I will not say that of the very important resolutions that have been brought down to-day. I see that it is proposed to give further aid to the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Northern. These resolutions must have been the result of negotiations between the Government and the respective companies, and there must have been important and voluminous 208i

correspondence between the Government and the two companies in regard to it. The only suggestion that I have to make to my light hon. friend is that before we change the programme and meet at two o'clock in the afternoon we should have that correspondence. I hope it will be brought down immediately.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I understand

that the Minister of Finance will be able to lay on the Table to-morrow any documents that are available.

As my right hon. friend has observed, we are not proposing to make any very important change. Some hon. members, to my certain knowledge, would be very glad to see the House meet at two o'clock in the afternoon instead of three, as a general rule. I departed from the proposal to hold sessions in the forenoon because there was a feeling, possibly well grounded, among some hon. gentlemen on both sides of the House that we should really get through more business by beginning at two in the afternoon than at eleven in the morning, as the latter would necessitate hon. members coming a long distance from their various places of residence in the city to this Chamber as at present located, and then going back home at one o'clock, and returning again for the afternoon sitting. So I thought the proposal which I have made would tend to an almost equal expedition in the despatch of business, and would at the same time meet the convenience of hon. gentlemen on both sides of the House.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

After tihe

statement of my right hon. friend, the correspondence respecting these appropriations will be brought down to-morrow, I have no objection to the motion.

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I should like to make a suggestion to the Prime Minister, and it is perhaps worthy of the consideration of the House. During the session we are sitting (here night after night-at 'least, some of us are-

Topic:   SITTINGS AT TWO O'CLOCK.
Permalink

May 2, 1916