April 18, 1916

CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

I have not heard of it. I will make a note of the matter.

Topic:   EDITION
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LIB

Francis N. McCrea

Liberal

Mr. McCREA:

I have a letter from Mr. McDougald, who says that the embargo has been put on and could not be removed. I do not think he has considered the matter very carefully.

Topic:   EDITION
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SUPPLY.


The House in Committee of Supply, Mr. Rhodes in the Chair. Trade and Commerce-Trade commissioners and commercial agents, including expenses in connection with negotiations of treaty or in extension of commercial relations; miscellaneous advertising and printing, or other expenditure connected with the extension of Canadian trade, $150,000.


LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I presume that when the supplementary estimates are under con-

sideration there will be ample opportunity to discuss this question?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

The same discussion can take place.

Mr. GRAHAlM: I do not see any reason why 'this should not pass.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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LIB
CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

Yes, >ve have a representative in Buenos Aires. The former and actual commissioner of trade there was Mr. Poussette who was one of our experienced trade commissioners and who was changed from South Africa to that point about four years ago. But Mr. Pousette went overseas and the work of the department iij Buenos Aires is being done by Mr. Webb, who also is a very efficient man. That reminds me that today I had a letter from a very prominent Canadian who has'just made a tour of the Argentine. I had given him letters to Mr. Webb, and he had called upon him. He was very cordial in his praises of the services Mr. Webb performed for him and gave a very flattering idea of the worth of his services to Canada. When .the war is over, Mr. Poussette will take his place again. In addition, we have the services of the British consuls in all South America. Two years ago Mr. Poussette made a tour of the states of South America, and consulted personally the consular agents. We have found his report of great value.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

Frederick Pemberton Thompson

Liberal

Mr. THOMPSON:

I followed with great interest the discussion which has taken place. I feel very strongly that Canada, in the very near future, will have a golden opportunity to reach out and get her share of the world's trade. Our interprovincial trade, of course, has been a great factor in our economic development; but we have built our transcontinental railways, subsidized our steamships, dredged our harbours, lighted our coasts, all with the ultimate idea of making our country one of the great trade routes of the world. And 1 think that just now, with war in progress and the sympathies of our Allies with us, we cannot do better than project our ideas regarding trade in the future w'th neutral countries and with our Allies. I have always thought that, we have never got our full share of the South American trade. Germany has had a very large percentage of it; Great Britain has had a large percentage of it; France has had a very

191J

considerable percentage; but Canada, I feel, has never had as great a share of South American trade as we should have had. In the countries that lie adjacent to the Equator, I believe, there is great opportunity for exchange of products with Canada. Brazil, for instance, offers a large field for the exploitation of our extra-territorial commerce. They grow many things which we want, and we grow many things which they want, pulpwood, for instance. It is generally considered that we have enormous resources in our forests for the making of pulp, aand I believe that Brazil imports a large quantity. The woods indigenous to the soil of Brazil, we are told, are not suitable for the making of pulp. That is one item, which, I think, .the Minister of Trade and, Commerce should investigate. I understand that there is an opening there in a larger way than in the past for the sale of our fish. Many of our manufactured products might find a market in Brazil. I am glad to know that we have a trade agent in the Argentine. Though that country and ourselves compete in many things, still there are articles which we can exchange with mutual profit. I hope the Minister of Trade and Commerce will be seized-as I am sure he will be-of the importance of cultivating as far as possible the exchange of products between Canada and the republics of South America. There is a great opportunity right now, and I believe that our neighbours in the United States are exploiting those markets in South America to-day, and I hope that we shall get our full share from now on as we have not had that full share in the past.

Progress reported.

On motion of Sir George Foster, the House adjourned at 11.35 p.m.

Wednesday, April 19, 1916.

The ' House met at Three o'clock, the Speaker in the Chair.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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QUESTIONS.


[Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.]


CANADIAN PAY AND RECORD OFFICE, LONDON.

LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

.

1. How many persons are employed In the Pay and Record Office, in London, England, in addition to the commissioned officers?

2. What is the average cost per month of the operation of said office?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PAY AND RECORD OFFICE, LONDON.
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CON

Sir ROBERT BORDEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. N.C.O.'s and men, 915; of this number about half are men who have been invalided, siek or wounded, from the front. Civilian clerks: male, 99 over military age, or unfit for military service; and 2G4 females.

2. For month of January, $96,200.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PAY AND RECORD OFFICE, LONDON.
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LIB

Mr. DEVLIN:

Liberal

1. Is there a Canadian Pay and Records Office in England? If so, how many officers are employed in it, and how many men?

2. What was the total number of officers and men of the Canadian force in England and France up to the end of March, 1916?

3. Is there a Pay and Records Office in connection with British War Office?

4. If so, how many officers and men are employed in it?

5. What is the total number of the force of the British Army?

6. Are the officers in the Canadian Pay and Records Office in England paid according to rank, or do they get special pay?

7. Do they get anything extra for allowance?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PAY AND RECORD OFFICE, LONDON.
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CON

Sir ROBERT BORDEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Tes. Officers, 50; N.C.O.'s and men, 915; of this number about half are men who have been invalided sick or wounded from the front. Civilian clerks: male, 99 over military age, or unfit for military service, *and 264 females.

2. 134,838.

3. Yes, by latest available information in Army List there are 38 pay and record offices in the United Kingdom. The duties, however, performed by the British pay and record offices differ in several important respects to the Canadian pay and Tecord office. The latter, in addition to the same duties carried out in British pay and record offices, also has charge of all officers' accounts and records, and includes a large audit staff which audits all expenditure before accounts are forwarded to Canada. Both these duties are performed by separate

' offices and staffs in the case of the British army. The work of the Canadian office is still further increased by having to furnish complete informatio'n to the Militia Department in connection with all casualties, in addition to supplying information to the War Office and to relatives of Canadian officers and men in England whereas in the case of the British offices, they only have to deal with the War Office and units, etc., in the United Kingdom, and have nothing to do with records or accounts of officers of the army.

4. No information, but from inquiries made in England last October, it was ascertained that the staff required to deal with

*

the pay and records of the British Expeditionary Force was higher, in proportion to the total strength of the army, than the staff of the Canadian pay and record office was to total strength of Canadian Expeditionary Forces overseas.

5. No information.

6. Officers are paid according to appointment for which special rates of pay and allowances are prescribed by Order in Council.

7. All allowances are included in special rates, except allowance in lieu of rations at 50 cents a day, the same as other officers receive.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PAY AND RECORD OFFICE, LONDON.
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PUGWASH SPUR LINE.

LIB

Mr. MACDONALD:

Liberal

1. What has been the total cost of the spur line of railway built from the main line of the Intercolonial railway into the brickyard at Pugwash, N.S.?

2. What has been the total amount of freight arrived from this spur ^line?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PUGWASH SPUR LINE.
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CON

Mr. REID: (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. The Pugwash spur was built to the brick and tile plant, on the west side of Pugwash harbour, at the request of the Nova Scotia Clay Works, Ltd., they guaranteeing to ship not less than 6,000,000 bricks per year for a term of 15 years, to pay an extra or shunting charge of 20c. per [DOT] thousand bricks, and to bring in at least 60 cars of coal each year for a period of 15 years, upon which they agreed to pay 20c. per ton as an extra or shunting charge. The cost of this spur line was $79,432.97.

2. Total Intercolonial earnings on freight delivered from this spur, $1,026.79.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PUGWASH SPUR LINE.
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THE VALE RAILWAY.

April 18, 1916