March 27, 1916

INTRODUCTION OF PRIVATE BILLS.


Bill No. 70, respecting the Atlin Railway Company.-Mr. Douglas. Bill No. 71, for the relief of Arthur Alexander Reinhardt.-Mr. Fripp.


THE HEIGHT OF OTTAWA BUILDINGS.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX:

I wish to call the attention of the right hon. Prime Minister, in the absence of the Minister of Finance, to a decision arrived at by the City Council of Ottawa. My right hon. friend, by referring to that excellent report of the Federal Plan Commission on a general plan for the cities of Ottawa and Hull, which has been laid on the table of the House, may read, at page 118:

In the matter of height regulation, a request was presented early in the work of the Federal Plan Commission to the Municipal Board of Control of Ottawa, recommending that buildings erected in the future within the business district shall not be more than 110 feet from the sidewalk level to the highest point of the building. The Board of Control urged the enactment of this regulation, which was passed and adopted by the City Council under by-law No. 3754, dated June 1, 1914. Certain modifications of this regulation, as shown on the plans and as outlined herein, are now recommended. -

The report adds:

If Ottawa and Hull are to acquire and retain the appearance of the capital city, full precaution must be taken lest commercial buildings reach such a height as to detract from the beauty and importance of its Government buildings. This is true both of the near views and of impressions formed from the first glimpses as one approached the city, either by railway or highway. Already several buildings have been erected on Sparks street which threaten the dominating height of the Parliament Buildings. The dominance may soon be entirely taken by high office buildings on the adjoining blocks, unless steps are taken to limit their height. No need is apparent in Ottawa for buildings higher than nine stories.

My right hon. friend may have noticed in the press a few days ago that an Ottawa resident had applied for the construction of a building on the southeast corner of Rideau and Little Sussex streets. The plans filed for that building showed a building less than the regulation height of 110 feet, but within the last few weeks Mr. Booth-because that is the gentleman who intends to build-for some reason conceived the idea that this building would be more remunerative if it went up two or three stories higher. Accordingly, he made application to the Board of Control of the city of Ottawa to permit this to be done. A remarkable thing

happened. The Board of Control, which had .yielded to the view of the commissioners appointed to draft this report, retraced its steps and amended the by-law which had been passed as a result of the conference between the commission and the Board of Control. It has decided to make a report to the City Council changing the by-law passed at the request of the Federal Plan Commission, and raising the limit of the height of buildings from 110 to 130 feet. It is true that no action has been taken so far on the report of the commission, but I believe that this report has been published under the authority and supervision of the Government, and it .seems to me that the city of Ottawa should be notified that it must not set such a bad example, but that it must carry out the recommendations of the commission and not retrace its steps in such manner as is proposed in the present instance. I wish to draw the attention of the Prime Minister especially to the fact, that Mr. Booth intends to lease a part of that building for Government offices. I am not sure that this is the case, but that is my information. If that is so, there is double reason why the Government should insist that the city of Ottawa should carry out the provisions of the by-law which was based upon the regulations .suggested by the Federal Planning Commission. We are about to reconstruct our Parliament Buildings, and it would be a great pity indeed to do anything which would impair their architectural beauty. The Government is spending enormous sums of money in Ottawa, the capital of the Dominion; the country does not begrudge the spending of that money, but we expect that the city of Ottawa will recognize what is being done for the capital and respect what regulations have been adopted or even suggested by the Federal Plan Commission.

Topic:   THE HEIGHT OF OTTAWA BUILDINGS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

My attention

had not 'been directed to any change in the by-laws proposed by the Board of Control of the city of Ottawa, I shall bring the subject to the attention of the Minister of Finance, and also1 confer with him about it. It is, of course, not only desirable, hut entirely necessary that there should be some reasonable restriction upon the height of build.ings erected in this city, and one would suppose that the limit which was agreed upon by the city on the one hand and the members of that commission on the other would have been adhered to. I

know of no reason why it should have been departed from. It is imperatively necessary, if the report of that commission or any part of it is to be carried out, that reasonable restrictions shall be made, and that there shall foe permanence to the understanding arrived 'at. .

Topic:   THE HEIGHT OF OTTAWA BUILDINGS.
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THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

There is a

statement in the press to-day that the Government have prohibited the export of nickel to certain countries. May I ask if the report is true, and if so, will the correspondence be brought down?

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

There is not any particular correspondence except a report made by Mr. Graham Bell, who has conducted the investigation on behalf of the Government. The reason for the passage of the Order in Council is that a small quantity of nickel has very recently been sent to the United States by a small company, with which the Government had not an arrangement. Neither the Canadian nor the British Government was in a position to trace the destination of that nickel without a good deal of difficulty. Therefore, it is proposed to prohibit formally the export of nickel, but to continue the exportation under license from time to time, which will make it necessary for any person or corporation exporting nickel from Canada to the United) States to enter into arrangements as satisfactory as those which were consummated in the early months of the war with the International Nickel Company.

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Will the Order in Council and the report of Mr. Bell be laid on the Table?

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I am not sure whether it would he desinhble to lay the report of Mr. Bell on the Table, but I shall be very glad to give my right hon. friend a copy of it; and, if there does not appear to be any objection in the public interest to doing so, I shall lay it on the table of the House.

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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LIB
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

The Order in Council will be laid on the table of the House to-morrow. It prohibits exportation except to British possessions. Export will be carried on under license, wherever the British and Canadian Governments are satisfied as to the ultimate destination of the article so exported.

206TH BATTALION-SUPPLY OF KITS.

On the Orders of the Day:

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. A. E. KEMP (Acting Minister of Militia):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Rouville the other day brought to the attention of the House an article in a newspaper in reference to certain articles included in the kits of soldiers having been made in Germany. 'The commanding officer of the 206th Battalion denies the correctness of the interview credited to him. Nearly all articles in the kit are made in Canada. Those not made in Canada are made in Great Britain. Certain articles which could not be obtained in Great Britain were obtained in the United States. Such articles were not produced in Canada. All razors purchased by the War Purchasing Commission were British razors, except that when they were not able to get a sufficient supply in Great Britain they purchased from the United States manufacturers direct. However, a small piece of wood, such as 1 hold in my hand, with a dozen thumb tacks in it, was found in the kit. It is not a regular issue, the 'Government did not issue it and the department did not put it in the kit. I do not know how it got in the kits of the 206th regiment. I tihink a joke has been perpetrated on the regiment: I see that on the back of it there is printed, " Made in Germany."

Topic:   THE EXPORT OF NICKEL.
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PRIVATE BILLS.


The House in Committee on Private Bills, Mr. Rhodes in the Chair. Bill No. 31, to incorporate the Eastern Canadian Union Conference Corporation of Seventh Day Adventists-Mr. Smith-in Committee.


LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

This Bill purports to deal with property rights of the eastern conferences of this particular church. I desire to have on record the assurance of those responsible for the Bill that it in no way affects the property rights of the western church organization.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
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CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

The hon. member for

South Ontario, in whose name the Bill

stands, is absent, but I told him that in his absence I would be glad to take his place and give any explanations required.

I cannot see how the Bill can affect the western church organizations as it specifically mentions the conferences which are entering into this particular consolidation. It does not deal with the West at all, so that I cannot see how it can affect the West.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

On the face of it, the Bill is exactly as my hon. friend says, but I just want some one to take responsibility for the assurance that the property rights of congregations of this particular church west of the lakes will not be affected. It may be that congregations west of the lakes possibly form a part of the Ontario Conference; and if that were the case it .might be desirable that the matter should be looked into a little more closely. If my hon. friend will take the responsibility of assuring the House that the property rights of the congregations of this church west of the lakes are not affected by the Bill, I will be satisfied.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
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March 27, 1916