March 15, 1916


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I wish to cal) the attention of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries to the fact that merchants in Quebec doing business with the West Indies have written to me that they cannot get space for molasses and products of that kind on board the subsidized steamers plying between the West Indies and St. John. Their correspondents in the West Indies

tell them that these steamers refuse to take syrups, the whole of the space being taken up by sugar, which, they say, is more paying freight. These merchants say that for some months past they have not been able to obtain any molasses. In view of the fact that these steamers are subsidized by the Government, this matter ought to be inquired into. I would ask the good offices of the Minister of Marine, or of the Minister of Trade and Commerce if he were here, to look into the matter and tell me what answer I may give to my correspondent in Quebec.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST INDIES.
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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

I shall be very glad to do so, although the matter is one that comes more within the jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce which controls questions of subsidies to .steamboats. I understand that these West Indian steamers during the present winter have been carrying very large cargoes. Although they are much larger boats than were on the route a few years ago, the development of business this winter has been so great that they have been unable to carry all the cargo offered. I presume it is necessary for them to bring the sugar to Canada for the purpose of affording work to the employees of the sugar refineries. I understand from the Minister of Railways that an attempt is now being made to relieve the situation, and it is probable that a boat belonging to the Railway Department, the Durley Chine, may be sent to the West Indies to help relieve the congestion. I shall be glad to make inquiry and to communicate such information as I may obtain to my right hon. friend.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST INDIES.
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INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY-ALLEGED EXPROPRIATION OF COAL.


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. J. D. REID (Acting Minister ol Railways):

I wish to refer to a statement

made by the hon. member for Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) on the 10th instant, when I was absent from the House. He said:

Coal consigned by the coal companies to industries some of them engaged in the manufacture of munitions, has been expropriated by the Intercolonial railway, and the information I have by telegram is that the taking of this coal is resulting in the stoppage of these industries.

When my attention was called to this, I

telegraphed the manager at Moncton, and received a reply stating that the hon. mem-

ber's information was wrong, and that no coal had been expropriated by the Intercolonial.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY-ALLEGED EXPROPRIATION OF COAL.
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PERSONAL EXPLANATION.


On the Orders of the Day:


?

Right Hon. S@

I rise in order to make a personal explanation. In the course of the debate the other evening, I used this language :

And when he suggests there was an alternative proposition from the other side of the House in amendment to the Government measure, he conveniently forgets that the amendment proposed to postpone any action whatever until after a general election should he held in Canada.

Mr. Pugsley: I do not think I proposed that, nor that any one else proposed it.

Sir Robert Borden : Does not the hon. member remember the terms of the amendment?

Mr. Pugsley: I do not think that was in It.

Sir Robert Borden : He may not think so, but that does not alter the fact that it was in it. His memory is not so good on this as on some other points. I have a distinct recollection that the proposals offered by hon. gentlemen opposite involved the postponement of action until after the general election.

My bon. friend from Pietou (Mr. E. M. Macdonald), at a later stage in the debate, expressed surprise that I should have made th'e statement to which I have alluded; and he read the amendment which was offered by my right hon. friend the leader of the Opposition (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) on the 12th day of December. I should like to say, in explanation and support of my assertion, that on the I3th of February, 1913, as reported at page 3103 of Hansard, the hon. member for Maisonneuve (Mr. Verville) moved a sub-amendment in these words:

That the following words be added at the end thereof: " and the consent of Parliament

should not he given to this resolution until it

has been submitted to and received the approval of the electors."

That amendment was undoubtedly accepted by my hon. friends on the other side of the House because when it was voted upon on the 13th of February, as is recorded at page 3239 of Hansard, the right hon. leader of the Opposition and all his supporters either voted for or were paired in favour of that sub-amendment. Then, at a later date, on the 18th day of February, as reported at page 3482 of Hansard, 1913, the hon. member for Assiniboia (Mr. Turriff), upon the second reading of the Bill, moved the following amendment:

That the said Bill be not now read a second time, but that it be resolved:

That it is the constitutional duty of the Government, under the terms of the British North America Act, Immediately to introduce a measure for the readjustment of the representation of the provinces in the House of Commons, according to the population of the said provinces as established by the census of 1911, and that this House do not proceed further with the Bill until such readjustment has taken place, .and the people have been duly consulted on the said Bill.

The leader of the Opposition and his followers voted also for that amendment. To give a perfectly correct statement of the record, I should, in fairness, say that my right hon. friend the leader of the Opposition and those who supported him voted al^o for the resolution proposed by my hon. friend on the 12th day of December, although they had previously voted for the amendment of the hon. member for Assiniboia. It is an absolute fact that they voted for the sub-amendment and for the amendment on the same day, the one proposing to postpone any action until after the people had been consulted and the other proposing immediate action. Hon. gentlemen on the other side supported by their votes both these propositions. And then, further, I find also that when the Bill reached the Senate, Sir George Ross, the Liberal leader in the Senate, moved the following amendment, which was carried by a vote of 51 to 27:

This Hous? is not justified in giving its assent to this Bill until it is submitted to the judgment of the people.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

That was not an alternative policy, but, having failed in one thing, try something else.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN :

The policy of my right hon. friend succeeded very well, because his amendment carried in the Senate and the Bill was defeated on that ground. I am giving it as an illustration of the proposals to which I alluded in my reply to the hon. member for St. John.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION.
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VICKERS-MAXIM WORKS, MONTREAL-LABOUR TROUBLES.


On the Orders of the Day:


LAB

Alphonse Verville

Labour

Mr. VERVILLE:

I wish to call the attention of the Government to the fact that there will ;be a great meeting of protest on Friday next respecting the strike at the Vickers-Maxim Works in Montreal; and if the Government does not do something I would not be surprised if there were a general strike there.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   VICKERS-MAXIM WORKS, MONTREAL-LABOUR TROUBLES.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Is there no reply to my hon. friend?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   VICKERS-MAXIM WORKS, MONTREAL-LABOUR TROUBLES.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

The Minister of Labour informs me that he has given a great deal of attention to an endeavour to bring matters to a more favourable situation in respect of the labour conditions in Montreal. He informs me that a meeting was held on Monday last between some members of the 'Government, the mayor of the city, and some of the labour representatives. It was believed at that time that the differences which existed were in a fair way of being settled. The Government will, of course, give its attention to the suggestion which my hon. friend has put before us, and to the view which he has expressed as to the danger of the strike extending, if these differences are not removed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   VICKERS-MAXIM WORKS, MONTREAL-LABOUR TROUBLES.
Permalink
CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I had the pleasure of

being present at the meeting to which the Prime Minister has referred. At that meeting the workmen were represented, and likewise the employers. There were present His Worship the Mayor of Montreal, the hon. Minister of Inland Revenue, and myself. Different suggestions were made, and

when we parted I was under the impression that there was every reason To believe that an understanding would be come to. A few moments before the hon. member (Mr. Ver-ville) rose to ask his question, I was shown a telegram very much to the effect which he stated. I have been in communication with some of the gentlemen connected with the Vickers establishment, trying to impress upon them the suggestions made at our meeting, and I had in mind to suggest to the Minister of Labour that he call their attention to what has been said, with the view of doing anything it may be possible to do to meet the situation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   VICKERS-MAXIM WORKS, MONTREAL-LABOUR TROUBLES.
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CUSTOMS TAXATION.


On motion of Sir Thomas White (Minister of Finance) the House went into Committee of Ways and Means, Mr. Rhodes in the Chair. 1. Resolved, that it is expedient to amend Schedule A to the Customs Tariff, 1907, and to strike thereout tariff items 92 and 267, the several enumerations of goods respectively, and the several rates of duties of customs, if any, set opposite each of the said items, and to provide that the following items, enumerations and rates of duties be inserted in said Schedule A: Tariff Items. - British Preferential Tariff. Intermediate Tariff. General Tariff.60 cents. 90 cents. 90 cents.2B7 Oils, petroleum (not including crude petroleum imported to be refined or illuminating or lubricating oils), '8235 specific gravity or heavier at 60 degrees temperature, per J cent. h cent. ^ cent.267a Crude petroleum in its natural state, ' 7900 specific gravity or heavier at 60 degrees temperature, when imported by oil refiners to be refined in their own factories 5 p. c. 74 P- c. . 74 p. C. Provided, however, that the goods hereinbefore enumerated shall he exempt from the rates of duties of customs specified in section 3 of the Customs Tariff War Revenue Act, 1915.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Are you taking up the amended resolutions?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TAXATION.
Permalink

March 15, 1916