March 14, 1916

SOLDIERS' PENSIONS.


Sir ROBERT BORDEN laid on the Table, in accordance with an order of the House passed on March 13, 1916, a copy of the pension list in force in Canada for disabled soldiers, and the petitions, letters and other documents relating to the amendment or readjustment of the same. On motion of Sir Robert Borden, the said papers were ordered to be printed forthwith, and were referred to a committee composed of Messrs. Green, Hazen, Le-mieux, Macdonald (Pictou), Macdonell (South Toronto), Oliver and Scott, to consider and report upon the rates of pensions so authorized, the establishment of a permanent Pensions Board, and other matters relating thereto or connected therewith.


PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.


On the Orders of the Day-:


LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. J. J. HUGHES:

I am in receipt of a number of letters and telegrams in regard to transportation between Prince Edward Island and the mainland. These letters and telegrams, which are pretty strongly worded, are to the effect that the efforts made to bring the car ferry steamer Prince Edward Island to Charlottetown are not successful; that the steamer is being injured by the strenuous work to which she is subjected in going through the ice; that

the mails are delayed; that travelling is hampered; that trade is tied up, and that apparently a few people in the capital are the cause of the trouble. Charlottetown is the centre of population in Prince Edward Island, and, if the steamer can make trips to that point, that is the place where she ought to call; but if she can not and can make daily trips to Georgetown, it would be wise to have her call there. I would like the minister to consider the matter, because the people are greatly inconvenienced. They allege that the steamer is being injured, and that by some means or other pressure is being brought do bear upon the department to have the steamer call at Charlottetown.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

The same instructions have been given to the captain of the car ferry Prince Edward Island that have been given in previous years to the captain of the Minto or whatever boat was maintaining the winter service. Those instructions were to continue the service to Charlottetown so long as it was practicable to do so, having regard' to Weather and ice conditions, and if it was found impossible to maintain that service, then to have the vessel go to Georgetown. Thus the matter is left, as I understand it, in the hands of the captain of the boat. It may be that the steamer now goes less frequently to Georgetown than in previous years; but this, I suppose, is owing to the fact that 'the Prince Edward Island is a stronger icebreaker than the boats formerly engaged in this service. I understand that the Prince Edward Island has missed only one daily trip during the present winter, and that by reason of a heavy snowstorm which prevailed, and it has missed the railway connection only on seventeen days. I will make inquiry into the statement that has reached the- ears of my hon. friend, that the ice conditions being encountered in going to -Charlottetown are so serious that the boat is being somewhat damaged. If that is the case, i-t would be a strong reason why the boat should be diverted from her present route and put upon the Georgetown route.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. HUGHES:

I suppose, Mr. Speaker, I should be in order to state the information I have received, which does not agree with that received by the minister. I have been informed-

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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CON

Auguste-Charles-Philippe-Robert Landry (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I would call the attention of the hon. member to the rule.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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LIB
CON

Auguste-Charles-Philippe-Robert Landry (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

If it is the desire of the House that the hon. gentleman should speak, I have no objection; but I would call the attention of the hon. member and of other hon. members to the practice as explained at page 476 of Bourinot:

Questions have been asked, when the orders are called, relative to the state of public business or other matters of public interest: but no discussion should b? allowed when a minister has replied to a question, nor after a member has made his p .rsonal explanation.

Of course if no objection' is taken to the hon. member speaking, I shall raise none.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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LIB
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Could not the hon. member give the information to the minister?

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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LIB
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

If my hon. friend will send me a memorandum stating the information he has, I will have the matter looked into at once.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY SERVICE.
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INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY CAR SHORTAGE.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Air. LEMIEUX:

I would like to call the attention of the acting Minister of Railways to the car situation on the Intercolonial railway. Yesterday I received from a large firm dealing in lumber and pulpwood in Quebec City a letter, from which I will Tead two or three lines:

We thought we would drop you a line in regard to the car situation on the Intercolonial railway. For the past two months we have been supplied with very few cars for our pulp-wood shipments to the States and when we have received cars, in some eases they have remained on the sidings where loaded for several weeks waiting to be moved.

The Intercolonial railway officials give as their excuse that the weather conditions were very unfavourable and that they are very short of power to move both empties and loaded cars, and in consequence it is impossible for them to do anything.

Can my hon. friend give me some information with regard to the car shortage and can he alleviate it in any way? Because I understand from this letter that the situation is very serious and that the lumbermen especially are very much hampered in their shipments on this account.

Topic:   INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY CAR SHORTAGE.
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CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

I am aware that there has been a little trouble on the Intercolonial, but not more, perhaps not as much as on the

other railways throughout the Dominion. The hon. member knows that during the last month or six weeks, not only the Intercolonial, but almost every other railway in Canada has been tied up by the great snow storms. The Intercolonial as done good iwork ini pushing traffic through as well as it has done in spite of the snow blockade. The motive power has been used largely to get the passenger trains through, and tlhe trains conveying troops. In addition to that, munitions and war supplies have been given the right of way. It is absolutely necessary to get that freight *through to load the transports waiting at Halifax and St. John. For these reasons, local freight has had to be delayed a little more than would have been the case otherwise. In Montreal the yards, not only of the Intercolonial but of the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific, [DOT] have been filled to their utmost capacity with cars held up by the blockade. I received a telegram yesterday from the general manager of the Intercolonial, and have asked for one to-day, dealing with the situation. In yesterday's message it was stated that the Intercolonial was clear, was running 175 cars a day, and anticipated no more trouble. I feel sure that the trouble with regard to local freight will soon be overcome. The people along the line must have a little patience on account of the absolute necessity of moving war supplies.

I think the hon. gentleman will agree that war supplies and munitions must take precedence. .

Topic:   INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY CAR SHORTAGE.
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LOCAL FREIGHT AT CHATHAM, N.B.

March 14, 1916