February 29, 1916

DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Mr. Speaker,

may I make a statement to the House on behalf of the Under- Secretary of State fbr External Affairs in connection with some criticism of the report of the department which appeared in the press? The statement is as follows:

The passport requirements of foreign countries is an appendix to the report, and is an exact transcription of a similar statement in the Foreign Office list for 1915. It does not relate to any regulation of ours. It is, as il purports to be, a record of what foreign countries normally require in the matter of passports.

It is only in a technical sense here for the Information of, the public, as the report is nearly a year old when published, and we provide all people seeking passports with up-to-date information concerning them. It might perhaps have been well to have inserted a note to this table saying that passports were not issued to enemy countries during the war, but the.fact being so obvious, and the Foreign Office not considering such a precaution necessary, led the clerk who made up these appendices to take the same view.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS.
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TRANSPORTATION OF GRAIN.

RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT.


Hon. J. D. REID (Acting Minister of Railways) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 47 to amend the Railway Act. He said: This is a Bill which the chairman of the Railway Commission has requested me to introduce, and which he recommends ter the consideration of the House. It is applicable particularly to the western provinces. As hon. members know, we had a very large crap in the West last year, and in certain portions of the country the railway lines are having a great deal of difficulty in moving it. Along some branch



lines large quantities of grain are still lying in the fields, and the railways are unable to move it before the spring rains come on. A great deal of it will be damaged unless some prompt action is taken. This Bill empowers the Railway Commission to order any railway company on whose lines grain is located to use its equipment to rush that grain to the nearest elevator, and then to order another railway company to take the grain from the elevator to Fort William. The commission may thus use two railway systems to ensure the early removal of the grain. At present the one railway has to take it from the point, where it may happen to be, in Alberta or Saskatchewan, all the way down to lake Superior, whereas the equipment of the company is not sufficient to enable it to take all the grain before spring. Compelling one railway to use its equipment for the short haul to the nearest elevator, and the other railway to take it from the elevator to lake Superior, will very much expedite the removal of the grain from the fields where it is now exposed to weather conditions. This, it is expected, will gteatly help the farmers of the West. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time


PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED.


Mr. BLAIN moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 39, (from the Senate), respecting the Governing Council of the Salvation Army in Canada, and to change the name thereof to The Governing Council of the Salvation Army, Canada East. Some HON. MEMBERS: Explain.


CON

Auguste-Charles-Philippe-Robert Landry (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

It is not customary for an explanation to be given w;hen a Senate Bill is introduced in the House of Commons (reading):

When any Bill is presented by a member, in pursuance of an Order of the House, or is brought from the Senate, the question, " That this Bill be now read a first time." shall be decided without amendment or debate.

If it is the desire of the House to have an explanation, I have no objection at all.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED.
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

I hardly agree with your Honour. A Senate Bill may not be debatable when introduced here, but surely it can be explained.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED.
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CON

Auguste-Charles-Philippe-Robert Landry (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

No doubt the House is entitled to an explanation, but I am told that it is not customary to explain Senate Bills when introducing them in this House.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

When a Bill is introduced in this House the explanation

is made on the introduction, and there :s no debate on the first reading. If the hon. gentleman desires an explanation I have no doubt it can be giyen.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED.
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

I just rose to say that I did not agree with the Speaker's ruling.

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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time. Bill No. 46, respecting the Algoma Central ,and Hudson Bay Railway Company-Mr. Boyce. Bill No. 42, for the relief of Robert Napper.-Mr. Buchanan. Bill No. 43, for the relief of Sherwood Norman Hill.-Mr. Douglas. Bill No. 44, for the relief of Ida May Woltz.-Mr. Boys. Bill No. 45,- for the relief of Cecily Ethel Maude Farera.-Mr. Buchanan.


BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.

WEDNESDAY SITTINGS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN moved:

That on Wednesday, the first day of March next, and subsequent Wednesdays to the end of the session, the House will meet at three o'clock p.m., and that the sittings on such days shall in every respect be under the same rules provided for other days; and that on-said Wednesdays, Government notices of motions and Government orders shall have precedence after questions and notice of motions for production of papers.

He said: This motion is made at a considerably later date than was the case last year. Last year, the House met on the [DOT] 4th of February. On the 16th of February I moved that the Government take Wednesdays and Thursdays, and the motion was accepted on February 25, or just three weeks after the session opened. We have now reached the seventh week of this session, and I therefore ask the House. to adopt the motion making Wednesday a Government day from now to the end of the session.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.
Subtopic:   WEDNESDAY SITTINGS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I am reminded by some friends around me that next Wednesday week is Ash Wednesday, and that if this motion carries there will be no more private members' days this session. I therefore suggest that the motion be amended so that we have to-morrow as a private members' day.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.
Subtopic:   WEDNESDAY SITTINGS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

If my right hon. friend particularly desires it, I am willing to consent, but I would point out that when we were discussing this matter last

year, my right hon. friend himself laid down what had been the practice in the past, namely, that at about the sixth week of the session Wednesday is taken as a Government day. We have gone a week beyond that this year, -and I therefore thought the motion would be accepted. We have not only greatly extended the time beyond last year, but beyond the period during which Wednesday is taken in an ordinary session.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.
Subtopic:   WEDNESDAY SITTINGS.
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

I should like to point out that the burning of the Parliament House destroyed a great many papers relating to matters which hon gentlemen on this side desired to bring before the House.

I have no desire to prolong the session, but I think we could clear these matters off if we were given one more private members' day.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.
Subtopic:   WEDNESDAY SITTINGS.
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February 29, 1916