March 27, 1915

CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

These are small observation stations. They are changed about from year to year. This year many of them will be in British Columbia. This service includes the preparation of tide-tables, etc.

Patrol of the northern waters of Canada, $50,000.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

What is the latest information the Government has in regard to the Stefansson expedition and what are their intentions in regard to it?

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

The Karluk sank on

January 11. Those who were on board of her before she sank were Mr. Stefansson, Mr. Jenness, anthropologist, Mr. McConnell, meteorologist, Mr. Wilkins, photographer, and some of the crew. The scientific party and crew then camped on the ice.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

Yes. On January 21, 1914, an advance party composed of Alex. Anderson, Charles Barker, John Brady and A. King started from the camp to effect a landing on Herald island. Nothing has since been heard from this party. On February 5, 1914, a .second party composed of Messrs. McKay, Murray, Beauchet and Morris left camp. Nothing has since been heard of them. A third party left on March 12, 1914, and landed on Wrangel island. The third party, which reached Wrangel island on the 12th March, was composed of O. Malloch, geologist; S. Mamen, assistant geologist; W. McKinley, magneticdan; R. U. Bartlett, captain; John Munro, first engineer; Robert Williamson, second engineer; F. M. Mauxier, fireman; L. W. Breddy, fireman; H. Williams, A.B.; R. Templeman, steward; E. F. Chafe, cabin hoy; and John Hadley, utility man. This party was under the command of Captain Bartlett, who is well known as a very skilful and experienced navigator in northern regions. All these men, with the exception of Messrs. Mamen and Malloch, who died from nephritis, and Breddy, who was accidentally -shot, were rescued by the King and Wing on September 7, 1914, and by the cordial assistance of the United States Government were landed safely at Victoria by the United States revenue cutter Bear. These men left Wrangel island and got over to the coast of Alaska. Captain Bartlett made his way down the coast and got word to us. We immediately got into communication with the United States Government, with the result that the revenue cutter Bear was sent out to bring the men down to Victoria.

Special attention is called by the officer of the department to the heroic behaviour of Captain Bartlett, not only for the manner in which he disciplined those under his command under most trying circumstances, *but also for his bravery in journeying over 160 miles of Arctic ice to rescue those who were stranded on "Wrangel island. Mr. Stefansson joined the southern party at Collinson point on March 8, as after leaving the Karluk he first made a trip to Herschel island to dispatch mail, and thence to the Mackenzie Delta

and Fort MacPherson for the purpose of scientific exploration. The scientific investigations of the southern party carried on during the winter of 1913-14 were most successful. Many new specimens have been obtained and forwarded to Ottawa for further investigation. I may say that since that time nothing has been heard of Stefansson. On March 22, 1914, accompanied by Messrs. Johnston, marine biologist; Mr. McConnell, secretary; Wilkins, official photographer; Bernard, Castleton, Crawford, Starkerson and Anderson, Stefansson started on a trip across the ice for the purpose of taking scientific observations, and of attempting to discover a new land or polar continental shelf. Of these men, Messrs. Wilkins, Bernard and Castleton, returned to camp. Later on Messrs. Johnston, McConnell and Crawford returned and reported that on March 23 the ice broke off and drifted eastward eighty miles in one night. They left Starkerson and Anderson with Mr. Stefansson. That was the last heard of Stefansson. There is a possibility that Stefansson may have got across to Siberia and may be heard from some day. The different parties out there, in fact, everybody going to the north, are keeping their eyes open and doing everything they can to find him. I had a long talk with Captain Bartlett, who came to Ottawa some months ago. He is a most experienced navigator in northern waters, and belongs to a family of experienced navigators. They are Newfoundland people. I think he was with Peary at the time he discovered the Pole. Bartlett thinks there is a possibility of Stefansson being found, if he has not already perished. He says Stefansson was a most experienced and resourceful man who would get along if anybody could. There is a possibility, but I am afraid it is only a possibility and not a probability, that Stefansson may be found.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

It is about 1,100 miles from the point where Stefansson was last seen.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

They have been sent here, but I understand have not been classified by the officers of the Geological Department. When they have been classified they will be put in the museum.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

What part did this Government take in securing the rescue of the party which reached Wrangel island, and were afterwards rescued by the King & Wing ? *

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

We knew nothing about it until we heard from Captain Bartlett. As soon as he sent word to us we got into touch with all the vessels that we learned were up in the North and with the United States Government and the Russian Government, which have vessels up in that neighbourhood. They at once went to their relief. The department has paid some bills that were incurred by one of these ships in bringing the party across to the mainland. We took immediate and prompt action as soon as we heard from Captain Bartlett and, as I said, communicated with the Russian and United States Governments. The United States Government rendered us very valuable aid with their revenue cutter Bear, which was up there.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

They would not accept anything.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

Yes, they were paid. That was the King & Wing.

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LIB
CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

It was certainly satisfactory to them, and I think it was a proper sum that we paid.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Has the Government in

mind any active steps to be taken in regard to Stefansson and the men who are with him ?

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

We have three ships up

there now searching for them: the North Star, the Alaska, and the Mary Sachs. We are doing everything that we think can be done, but as the hon. gentleman knows it is not an easy situation. These three ships have instructions to search and do all they can to find them.

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LIB

March 27, 1915