March 12, 1915

LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

Not much hope for the Georgian Bay canal this year.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
CON

William Thomas White (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WHITE:

Does the hon. gentleman suggest that we should go on with it at once?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM :

No, my suggestion is that the hon. gentleman .should make up his mind at once about it. If he does not intend to do anything this year, let him make *up his mind whether or not he intends to do something next year. A commission was appointed a couple of years ago to investigate the commercial possibilities of this scheme. Have they made any report to the Government?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
CON

William Thomas White (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WHITE:

No report has been made. I understand that the commission is at work obtaining the necessary information as

the basis of the report which they will subsequently make.

Bill reported, read the third time, and passed. ' .

Bill No. 65, respecting the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Company-Mr. T. G. Stewart-in committee.

On section 3-powers, etc.:

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
LIB

Edward Walter Nesbitt

Liberal

Mr. NESBITT:

Is the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo railway operating now?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
CON

Edward Arthur Lancaster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LANCASTER:

Yes. The Erie and Ontario railway joins the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo railway at Smithville.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
LIB

Edward Walter Nesbitt

Liberal

Mr. NESBITT:

What is the present bond issue of the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Company?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink
CON

Edward Arthur Lancaster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LANCASTER:

I cannot say at the moment.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS.
Permalink

Section agreed to. Bill reported, read the third time and passed. The following Bills were considered in committee, reported, read the third time and passed, without discussion: Bill No. 49, respecting the Calgary and Fernie' Railway Company.-Sir James Aikins. Bill No. 50, respecting the Canadian Western Railway Company.-Sir James Aikms. Bill No. 54, respecting the Toronto Terminals Railway Company.-Mr. Macdonell. Bill No. 62, respecting the Bank of Alberta. -Mr. Douglas. Bill No. 61, respecting the Simcoe, Grey and Bruce Railway Company.-Mr. Middle-bro.


SECOND READING.


Bill No. 71, respecting The Sterling Life Assurance Company of Canada.-Mr. Macdonell.


THE BUDGET.

PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.

LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY (resuming):

Mr. Speaker, when you left the Chair at six o'clock, I was making some reference to the lament of the Finance Minister and his friends in this House and throughout the country, that the burdens resting so heavily on the shoulders of this Government in the matter of meeting the expenditures of the country are a legacy from the late Administration. I have pointed out that, so far as the building of the Hudson Bay railway was concerned,

the right hon. the Prime Minister was equally responsible with the late Government for the inauguration of that scheme, and that, so far as the burden placed upon the country by the construction of the National Transcontinental railway was concerned, that proposition had been submitted to this country and the country had approved of it, whether the cost be small or great. It is quite true, we admit that the cost of the National Transcontinental railway was greater than originally expected. Nevertheless there is no condemnation to fall upon the late Administration if it can be demonstrated to the people of Canada that the money voted by this Parliament and by the people of this country for the construction of that road, actually went into its construction. I had pointed out that this Government, in its zeal to demonstrate that all the money voted for that purpose had not gone into the construction of the road, had spent some $100,000 in salary and expenses to two gentlemen, who spent over a year of their time looking into the various contracts let by the late Administration, from Moncton to the city of Winnipeg. WThat was the result of that investigation? It was heralded in the Tory newspapers throughout the length and breadth of Canada before being submitted to this House as one of the greatest scandals in Canadian history. We find that after that report was examined, dissected, taken to pieces and put together again by my hon. friend the member for South Renfrew (Mr. Graham), no responsible public man in this country and no reputable, responsible Tory newspaper, has given any consideration or more than a mere passing mention to the contents of that report which was to produce such an enormous scandal in Canadian history. Sir, the people of Canada are concerned to know how their money is spent, and they are concerned to know that large sums of money, which they voted for the building of the National Transcontinental railway, have been spent in the construction of the road. That that has been done, Sir, is absolutely proven by the report that was intended primarily to be a partisan, biased report, that was intended to prove exactly the opposite, a report which, in my judgment, is_the most splendid vindication of the honesty and integrity of the late Government that we have had since that Government went out of office. If the National Transcontinental railway is not, and will not be in the future, the great national asset that we had hoped, the fault will not lie with the late Liberal Adminis-

Laurier had been followed four years ago, and two years ago, we would not have had every iseaport in Canada in a panic at the outbreak of war, and to-day we would not be depleting the British navy in the North Sea of cruisers to convoy our troops across the Atlantic. The Minister of Finance, referring to my right hon. leader, compared his hands to the hands of Lady Macbeth; but if this tariff legislation goes through, history will refer to the hands of the Minister of Finance as the Teuton hands that delivered the most ruthless blow against British trade that could be dealt n in this crisis of British history.

The Minister of Finance wants to know what alternative proposals gentlemen on this side of the House have to make to his tariff. I give him one suggestion obtained from a source that should appeal to him: the legislation imposed by the German Reichstag to place a tax upon the output of war materials by the manufacturers of Germany. Other gentlemen on this side of the House have offered suggestions, but the Minister of Finance answers that they are totally inadequate and do not fill the bill. I presume then that all the people of Canada have to hope for is that if the Budget proposals of the Minister of Finance do not. fill the bill, we may expect a further dose of this same treatment when this Parliament meets again. Mhat is the situation? $100,000,000 required for war expenses, $180,000,000 or thereabouts required for capital and current expenditure, of which only $120,000,000 is available from our present sources of income, leaving a balance against us of $60,000,000. The Minister of Finance says: We must

provide, and we propose to provide by an increase in the tariff, this $60,000,000. A very worthy member on the Government side of the House gave this Government a slogan when it first came into office. That . slogan was: " Dash away and spend the

money." This Government has carried out that policy so well, it is going so fast down the toboggan slide in this matter of reckless and extravagant expenditure, that it does not wish to have the sensation of coming to a sudden halt on account of the unusual situation brought about by this great European struggle. When we on this side of the House offer suggestions along the line of retrenchment, of curtailment, the Government waves us aside with an airy wave of the hand, as if retrenchment were quite out of the question under the present

[M>

Neely.]

regime in Canada. I doubt if there are very many hon. members who, since this war broke out, and indeed during the last year or two, have not had to adopt a policy of retrenchment as regards their personal expenditure. If that policy is good for the individual, I fail to see why it should not be good for Canada as a nation. Has it ever entered the mind of my hon. friend the Minister of Finance that he might have increased the revenue by a sweeping reduction of the tariff instead of by increasing the tariff in many instances. That suggestion, of course, is falling upon deaf ears. My hon. friend the Minister of Finance cannot listen to or hear any argument that' is not along the lines of the proposals contained in his Budget statement. The people of Canada are not averse to paying their share of Canada's expenditure in this great struggle that means the freedom of every civilized nation in the world; but, if I am not mistaken, they will object very strongly to the tariff proposals of the Government by which, for one dollar that goes into the Dominion treasury four or five dollars will go into the pockets of the protected interests of this country. I would have been very glad had it been possible that this session of Parliament would have passed like the session of August last, in absolute unanimity so far as any partisan discussion is concerned; but. if there is any blame for the division that has taken place on the proposals of the Minister of Finance, that blame must be placed where it rightly belongs, namely, at the door of the Government. The Opposition have been given absolutely no voice in the making of the proposals for increasing the revenue. As a member of the Opposition I feel that I would be derelict in my duty were I not to oppose as strenuously as possible, the method by which the Minister of Finance proposes to increase the revenues of this country.

Before I conclude, I want to say a personal word with reference to

9 p.m. the constituency that I have the honour to represent. As some hon. members know, I represent a constituency that has perhaps as cosmopolitan a population as is to be found in any part of Canada. Of that population some hundreds of families are of German birth or German extraction. There is an idea in the minds of some of our good people in other parts of Canada that, in those German and Austrian communities in the West, there

must at this time 'be a considerable amount of disaffection. Speaking on behalf of this portion of the population in my constituency, I want to say that, since the outbreak of this war, a war which has indeed touched the feelings and rent the heartstrings of many of our people, whether of English or of German birth, in every possible way, from the moment of the outbreak of the war, they have conducted themselves as true and loyal citizens of this great Dominion of Canada. I cannot speak too highly or too generously of their thrift, their integrity, their high class of citizenship. If under the circumstances they have not sent their sons to the front-and they cannot he expected to do so-no class of our population has responded more liberally to the call for assistance for the families of those who have gone to the front than has the German population throughout the various districts of the West. While it is not to be expected that this class of our population should hold the tie of British connection as strongly as do those who are Canadian or British-born, yet I believe that every one of these citizens would shoulder arms to-morrow if any foreign foe were to attack the coasts of Canada. That is as far as we can expect their loyalty and patriotism to go in this, the first era of their residence in this country.

I have spoken somewhat longer than at the outset I proposed to do; but, in conclusion, I want to say that, in voting, as I propose to do, for the amendment of my right hon. leader, I believe that I am voting not only in the best interests of the great mass of the people of Canada, but for the shortening of that terrible struggle that is costing Canada and the Empire and the Allied Nations so much of their best blood and so much of their wealth. I am voting for this amendment, because I believe that the proposals of the Government are a direct blow at the financial strength of Britain at a time when every fibre of her energy is necessary to prosecute the greatest struggle that the world has ever seen, and, we hope, will ever see-a struggle which in our hope and judgment can have but one result, namely, the vindication of the principles of democracy the world over.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Eugène Paquet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EUGENE PAQUET (L'Islet) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I heartily congratulate my hon. friend, the member for Humboldt (Mr. Neely) on the brilliant address he has just given. I shall endeavour to answer his arguments by examining the impor-, tant question of the budget. L

The salient fact of the fiscal year of 191213 is the unprecedented business expansion in Canada.

During the fiscal year of 1910-11 our trade amounted to $769,482,000.

During the year 1912-13, for the first time in our history, our trade reached the handsome figure of $1,085,000,000. In every case, the statistics revealed the steady advance of agriculture, industry and commerce; but with the closing months of 1913 Canada and the other civilized countries witnessed the opening of a trying period for industry and trade.

In July 1914, according to the hon. Minister of Finance, a marked change for the better was felt. The most powerful nations suddenly began to make war on one another, with all the murderous resources furnished them by modern science and skill.

As the hon. the leader of the Opposition has remarked: " This war is a conflict between liberty and despotism." Servia, Russia, France, Belgium and our Mother Country are fighting for the cause of right and justice. Without being constrained to do so and instantly, in an outburst of patriotic solidarity, Canada proffered her food products, her gold, her brave soldiers, who to-day are shedding their blood for the cause of civilization and mankind.

While the Germans have been guilty of atrocities, have committed cruelties never heard of before in the history of civilized nations, ever since the war broke out; while this mighty nation tramples under foot the most solemn treaties, the soldiers of Canada are fighting for the fundamental principles of civilization.

As the hon. member for Laprairie says: " We are only a self-governing colony, and, unlike other nations, we are not forced to fight for the preservation of our sovereignty."

As a young nation acting our part in the Empire, we champion the cause of liberty and of Gallic culture.

The French of Canada are fighting the destroyers of temples, the murderers of the aged, of unarmed and defenceless priests; the foe who violate and mutilate helpless innocence.

German militarism has brought on this frightful war, a war so horrible that it staggers mankind. We must destroy this plague.

As the Archbishop of Montreal has said: "It is the duty of every one of us to give

I England our loyal and generous support." Our people will not fail to do so. The

voice of religion, as well as love of country, urges it. The French Canadians have responded loyally to the call of the flag, realizing their great duty-to guard our dearly-won liberties.

Permit me here to quote the words of the President of the Montreal Board of Trade:

While applauding our soldiers who sacrifice their lives on the battlefields, let us remember that those who stay at home must maintain our economic life, above all must stimulate production in order to more completely satisfy the needs of the war, and to recuperate the more rapidly after the losses and sacrifices which the war will entail.

Throughout the whole world the European war has created an almost unprecedented money crisis. As one of our financiers has remarked, it is fortunate for. Canada that the sound financial methods of our hank directors and the able intervention of the hon. Minister of Finance have safeguarded our best interests.

Our financial institutions, thanks to able, prudent and enlightened management, have escaped economic disaster. While acknowledging the wisdom of our business men, we must also give the Government a fair share of the credit for contributing to this happy result by its prudent administration.

I have been vividly impressed by the admirable "made in Canada" campaign. During the fiscal year of 1912-13, our imports amounted to $675,000,000. We have, therefore, in a single year, sent $675,000,000 to foreign producers. This gives us an idea of the importance of our domestic and interprovincial market. Let us be vigilant in order to benefit still more by this market. It is the blood circulating continually from one member of the country to the other, finding its way to all parts of the body and giving it vitality and growth.

The orders for military supplies have greatly aided in maintaining our industrial concerns, although many of our manufacturers have been seriously affected-by current events.

Let us therefore respond to the noble appeal " Patriotism and Production " by buying goods made in Canada by Canadian workmen.

That expert economist, Mr. Errol Bou-chette, lias been among us an apostle of the industrial idea. He would inscribe on our banners, he would imprint on our hearts these patriotically inspired words: " Let us capture the industrial world." Thanks to the development of this idea and to the application of the national policy, numerous manufacturing establishments have sprung

[Mr. Paquet. 1

up, our natural ressources have been developed and (the labouring classes have found plenty of [DOT]employment, regular work and good wages.

Thanks to national protection, the manufacture of harvesting, binding and mowing machines has reached a marvelous state of perfection. Consequently the Government was enabled, during the last session, to reduce by five per cent the customs duty on binding, harvesting and mowing machines. Thanks also to the national policy of protection, our exports of agricultural products have increased by $50,000,000 during the last fiscal year.

Notwithstanding the customs duties, we import 31,000,000 pounds of meat.

What would happen should these duties be taken off?

The free entry of foodstuffs would affect adversely some 6,285 manufactories which now employ 52,000 hands.

In their efforts to uproot the tree of national protection of industries, members the Opposition are displaying some ingenuity.

Planted in the soil of Canada by Sir John A. Macdonald, the tree of protection-protection to the farmer and to the manufacturer-will weather all storms, all attacks of the Liberal party.

The honourable member for Laprairie and Napierville has severely criticized the administration of the Public Works Department. / *

To this I answer: Sawdust wharves and rake-offs on dredging contracts are things of the past. Their day has gone.

In 1908, when the Minister of Marine paid $50 a day to foreigners to audit the accounts of the Department of Marine, the hon. member had not a single word of censure for his friends.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Edmond Proulx

Liberal

Mr. PROULX (Translation):

Wnat salary does Mr. Bergeron receive?

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Eugène Paquet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PAQUET (Translation):

I do not say that the hon. member for Laprairie-Napier-ville has wilfully misled the House in saying that my friend Mr. Bergeron received a salary of $30 a day, when he is paid only $20.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Edmond Proulx

Liberal

Mr. PROULX (Translation):

But he

draws $10 more for living expenses.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Eugène Paquet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PAQUET (Translation):

Mr. Bergeron is paid only $20 a day salary, the $10 are for expenses.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

March 12, 1915