February 23, 1915

LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

That is the way the

farmers are made prosperous.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Yes. In this country I do not think that we import the larger pro-

portion of our ploughs. We have men in Canada who make ploughs; they are very excellent ploughs, and they are made in such numbers and of such quality that they are even exported to the United States to compete in the United States markets with the product of that country. So that, if we import one million dollars' worth of ploughs, we may reasonably believe that we produce three million dollars' worth in this country. And so our bill in respect to ploughs, under the seven and a half per cent increase, will be not $75,000 but $225,000, $75,000 of which will go to the Treasury, and the balance to the patriotic manufacturers of ploughs to aid in the campaign of patriotism and production.

I hope the House will pardon me for taking so much time on this feature of the case, but my hon. friend from Toronto was so insistent on the point that everybody was satisfied with this tariff, that I am sure hon. gentlemen will permit me to show to what extent we have reason to be satisfied with it. But there , are people besides farmers who are interested in this tariff, because many of the people of Canada use cottons and woollens. In the year ending 31st March, 1914, under eight particular items, we imported woollens to the value of over twenty million dollars, blankets, worsteds, tweeds, etc., and upon that importation we paid a duty of five and a half million dollars, if we buy that same quantity of woollens next year, then under the five per cent and seven and a half per cent increase we will pay in the neighbourhood of $1,225,000 additional to what we paid before. Remember we do not get all these goods from Great Britain and they do not all come under the preference, although the larger portion does. In cottons, taking four items, we imported seven million dollars' worth last year, and we paid on that $1,225,000 duty. Averaging the five per cent and the seven and a half per cent increase, we will pay in addition $409,000 on the same importation next year. I do not imagine that we import one-half the cottons we use in Canada. We have immense cotton factories, we must be producing a great deal of cotton goods, and I think we produce at least twice as much as we import, so that while the Minister of Finance takes less than half a million dollars out of the people for the Treasury, his friends, these good Canadians, these patriotic manufacturers of cotton, will draw down anywhere from one million to one and a half million dollars. There 25

is no doubt they are highly satisfied with the increase in the tariff. There is another class of patriots in this country who ought to have attention at this particular time,

I speak of the manufacturers of boots. In the year ending 1914 we purchased $4,225,000 worth of boots and we paid $1,225,000 duty upon these boots. Taking the increase at seven per cent, because the larger portion of these boots comes from the United States, we will he paying $300,000 more duty upon the same quantity of boots imported next year. But everybody knows that we only import a comparatively small part of the boots we use in this country. I fancy that we make at any rate three pairs of boots in Canada for home use for every pair that we import. If that fact is a fact-and it is unquestionably a fact in this time of strife and hardship, when the cost of living has gone up and the means of living have gone down-my hon. friend the Minister of Finance, by his Budget, is handing to the manufacturers of boots in Canada approximately $1,000,000 a year.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

What does the hon.

member for St. Antoine (Mr. Ames) think of that?

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Perhaps the hon. gentleman, while he is on the subject, will say why this Government raised the duty on boots by five per cent?

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

My hon. friend will have all he can handle in explaining what his Government has done. The point is what his Government has done, not what the late Government did.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

It is you I am asking

for an explanation. I hope you will make it. [DOT]

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

My hon. friend is asking for an explanation of something that is not pertinent to the subject. We are discussing war taxes that are being imposed at the present time.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Yes. My conclusion is

that, if the estimate of the amount of home production is correct, to those sterling patriots who are producing boots in Canada so greatly to the credit of Canada, and who are so strongly upholding Canada in its share of this war that is in progress, my hon. friend the Minister of Finance has handed out a little matter of $1,000,000 at this time, when every man is wondering where his revenue is to come from and how

he can make his expenditure and his revenue meet.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Michael Clark

Liberal

Mr. MICHAEL CLARK:

That is the way the bootmakers die for the flag.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

In the exposure that we

have had lately, if there is any class of manufacturers in this country who are not entitled to special consideration at the hands of this Government, it is our friends Who make boots.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

Who make boots for

the army. There are some very good makers of boots at St. John.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Who make boots for the

army. My hon. friends have spoken of this Budget as a war Budget. It is a war Budget inasmuch as it is a Budget that is placed before the country while a war is in progress, but it is not a Budget which provides for meeting the expenses of that war. That we have on the authority of the Minister of Finance, and the facts are evident on the face of the record. The war is responsible for many things; but it is not responsible for the mismanagement of the finances of Canada which has occurred since our friends have taken office, and which has resulted in a deficit as between current revenue and current expenditure for the current year, amounting, on the authority of the Minister of Finance, to, I think, $20,000,000. .

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

William Thomas White (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. T. WHITE:

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

$10,000,000 this year, and that is with an additional and special tax, which is expected to produce $7,000,000 during the last six months of the year, so that it really amounts to a deficit of $17,000,000 on current account.

I would like to see the Government appreciate their responsibility in regard to the part that Canada has to take in this war. They have not done so up to date; and it is not right or fair-I will not go further and say what ought to be said-that the Government should make the pretence, should hold out the false signal, and declare that the existence of this war is a reason why they increase the burdens on the people of Canada for the benefit of their particular friends. We hear a great deal in war time vessels sailing under false ,

flags. When this Government put forward, as tneir excuse for increasing tne tax burden upon the people of this country, the existence of the war in Europe, tney are sailing under a false flag; they are attempting to

trade upon the patriotism of the people for the benefit of their particular friends and supporters, the manufacturing interests. This is neither a time nor an occasion when any government of any British country siiould come before Parliament and the people with such a proposal. This is a time when we ought to have fair play, fair dealing, and square talking. The Government should not attempt to mislead public opinion by mis-stating the facts of the case, putting upon their stamp, " war tax," when not a particle nor a fraction of the cost of the stamp is intended to pay any part of the war cost.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

What about the interest?

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Oh, yes.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Accorumg to the statement of the Minister of Finance, we are not even providing enough money to pay the expenditures that we have undertaken, aside altogether from the war, let alone interest. We have to borrow money to pay the interest, as my hon. friend knows.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Nonsense.

Topic:   THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   PROPOSED WAR TAXATION.
Permalink

February 23, 1915