February 15, 1915

APPOINTMENT OP TRANSLATORS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN moved:

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OP TRANSLATORS.
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Motion agreed to.


WAR SUPPLIES-BOOTS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

With regard to the report of the departmental committee which had under consideration the character, quality and suitability of the

boots supplied to the first Canadian contingent, laid on the table of the House to-day, I think it desirable and in the public interest, and also due to the various manufacturers who supplied the boots, that the report of the committee and all matters which it concerns should be referred to a special committee of the House, in order that the subject may be further investigated, if desirable, and that the committee may report to the House in due course its findings with regard to the whole matter. Accordingly, I shall move to-morrow, when motions are called, that a committee of seven members be appointed for that purpose. If my right hon. friend will give me to-day the names of three hon. gentlemen on the other side of the House, I shall be glad to have their names included in the list of members of the committee.

Topic:   WAR SUPPLIES-BOOTS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

On Wednesday, February 10, the following questions were asked by the hon. member for Guys-bor-ough (Mr. Sinclair):

1. Has an investigation been made regarding the quality of the boots supplied to the Department of Militia and Defence for the use of the Canadian volunteers?

2. If so, who made this investigation and has the inquiry been closed?

The answers given by the Minister of Militia were as follows:

1. Yes.

2. Board appointed by the Minister of Militia. The inquiry has been closed.

There was in the press some time ago a report that the Minister of Militia had instituted inquiries in his own department, and it was also stated in the press that an inquiry had been instituted by a commission appointed by the Government for the purpose. Is it true that a commission has been appointed to conduct an investigation into this matter?

Topic:   WAR SUPPLIES-BOOTS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

The inquiry was a departmental one, made, I understand, by a board appointed by the Minister of Militia.

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REPORTED APPEARANCE OF AEROPLANES.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

A report appeared in the public press to-day to the effect that aeroplanes coming from the United States had been sighted. Can the right hon. Prime Minister give me any information on this point?

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I am afraid that I am unable to give the point of departure of the aeroplanes in question. The only information I have on the subject is that about nine o'clock last evening the mayor of Brockville telephoned to me that three aeroplanes had crossed over Brockville, going to the north, and that one of them had turned a searchlight upon the town, lighting up very considerably the principal street. On receiving the information I communicated it to the chief of the general staff, with the suggestion that it should also be made known to the Commissioner of Dominion Police.

Topic:   REPORTED APPEARANCE OF AEROPLANES.
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QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE.


On the Orders of the Day being called: Mr. 0. TURGEON: (Gloucester, N.B.): I rise to a question of privilege. My attention has been called to an article in the St. John Standard of the 11th instant, in which certain assertions of mine are misrepresented. I am reported as having used the following words at a recruiting -meeting: I <lo not see how Britain can expect the men of Gloucester county to volunteer or enlist to light her battles when they are obliged to leave their homes and go to the United States to earn their living and a living for their families. I brand that report as an infamous distortion of fact and language. Others may call it what they wish, but that is what I think of it. I believe that no member of this House-especially you, Mr. Speaker, who have heard practically all my utterances in this Parliament during the last fifteen years-would say that I would use these remarks before the people of Gloucester county. I believe too that the diatribes contained in that report are not the views of the editor who wrote it. It has been published, no doubt for a purpose, one month after I made the declaration in Tracadie; but every man from New Brunswick knows that I was the first to organize and call recruiting meetings in Gloucester coupty and along the north shore of New Brunswick, as is shown by the correspondence with the Canadian Patriotic Committee of St. John, New Brunswick, of which His Honour the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick is president and Mr. Jas. Gilchrist is secretary. At my instance, eloquent speakers have attended these meetings. One of them in Bathurst was addressed by a gentleman whose name is familiar throughout New Brunswick, more particularly to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, Mr. F. M. Sproule, a member of the legal profession, an ex-member of the legislature, one of the most eloquent speakers it has ever been my pleasure to listen to, and the next morning fifteen or seventeen young men from Bathurst enlisted before dinner. If I had allowed this statement to go without contradiction some one, not in this House or in New Brunswick, might have believed it. I did not wait until war was declared to pronounce my allegiance or my loyalty to the Crown. My allegiance was my birthright and my loyalty has grown stronger with each year of my life. At the last meeting I addressed I did say, at the end of my remarks, after calling on the young men to enlist, that the young men of the county of Gloucester had not responded as generously as I had expected, although more generously than those of any of the surrounding counties. The number was not to my satisfaction. I said that, owing to the hard times prevailing in Gloucester since the year before, owing to the depression of business, such as the closing of the iron mine at Bathurst by which three or four hundred men were thrown out of employment, many of whom had gone to the United States and were therefore not here to enlist, a larger number should have gone to the front. I shall not take up your time by reading the diatribe against me that follows, as I have said I do not think that the editor of the Standard himself believes it. If any further explanation is required at any time I shall be glad to give it.


PRIVATE BILLS.

SECOND READINGS.


Bill No. 4, respecting the Alberta Central Railway Company.-Mr. Michael Clark. Bill No. 5, respecting the Athabasca and Grand Prairie Railway Company.-Mr. Green. Bill No. 6, respecting the Brantford and Hamilton Electric Railway Company.-Mr. Barker. Bill No. 7, respecting the British Columbia and White River Railway Company.- Mr. Stevens. Bill No. 8, respecting the Edmonton, Dun-vegan and British Columbia Railway Company.-Mr. Green. Bill No. 9, respecting the Essex Terminal Railway Company.-Mr. Wilcox. Bill No. 10, respecting the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada.-Mr. E. M. Macdonald. Bill No. 11, respecting The Hudson Bay, Peace River and Pacific Railway Com-



pany, and to change its name to Winnipeg and Hudson Bay Railway Company.- Mr. W. H. Sharpe. Bill No. 12, to amend the Independent Order of Foresters Consolidated Act.-Mr. Glass. Bill No. 13, respecting the Montreal and Southern Counties Railway Company.-Mr. Bickerdike. Bill No. 14, to ratify and confirm a certain agreement between the Canadian Northern Railway Company and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. Oliver. Bill No. 15, respecting certain patents of Duncan Donald McBean.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 16, respecting The Title and Trust Company, and to change its name to Chartered Trust and Executor Company.-Mr. Nesbitt. Bill No. 17, respecting The Canadian Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. W. H. Sharpe. Bill No. 20, respecting The Canadian Northern Railway Company.-Mr. Bradbury. Bill No. 21, respecting the Canadian Northern Ontario Railway Company.-Mr. Blain. Bill No. 22, respecting the Canadian Northern Quebec Railway Company.-Mr. Guilbault. Bill No. 2.3, respecting the James Bay and Eastern Railway Company.-Mr. Girard. Bill No. 24, respecting the Ottawa and New York Railway Company.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 25, respecting the South Ontario Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. Smith. Bill No. 26, respecting the Southern Central Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. Green. Bill No. 27, respecting the St. Lawrence and Adirondack Railway Company.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 28, respecting the Toronto Eastern Railway Company.-Mr. Smith.


QUESTIONS.


[Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.] imperial government loans to


CANADA.

February 15, 1915