May 15, 1914

PRIVATE BILL.

FIRST READING.


Bill No. 195, to incorporate the Canadian General Council of the Boy Scouts Association.-Mr. Currie.


TORONTO TERMINALS.


Hon. J. D. REID (acting Minister of Railways) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 196, respecting ithe Canadian Pacific Railway Company, the GTand Trunk Railway Company of Canada, and the Toronto Harbour Commissioners. He said: I have a memorandum here prepared by the deputy minister explaining this Bill, and perhaps the reading of that will be the briefest explanation I could give to the House of this measure: In the Toronto Viaduct Act of 1913, chapter 11, 3-4 George V., the description of the property which may be expropriated is given as follows: All or any lands and lands covered by water in the city of Toronto lying within the district south of the existing right of way of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from Yonge street east to the prolongation southerly of Berkeley street and south of the existing right of way of the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada from the prolongation southerly of Berkeley street east to Cherry street and extending out to the present Windmill line, and also a strip of land not exceeding one hundred and fifty feet in width, immediately south of the Windmill line and extending from the prolongation of Parliament street in the west to Cherry street in the east. On February 25, 1914, the general solicitor of the Grand Trunk Railway system wrote as follows: We have just discovered that there is a mistake in the description of the lands referred to in the Toronto Viaduct Act, that is, chapter 11 of the Statutes of 1913. The mistake is caused by the draughtsman thinking that the Windmill line terminates at Cherry street instead of Parliament street. The result of that the lands described have no southerly boundary between Parliament and Cherry streets. In co-operation, therefore, with the Canadian Pacific railway, I have re-drafted the Act with a correct description and we have thought it more convenient to have a new Act instead of amending the Act of last year. I inclose copy of draft Bill and have omitted from it the clause providing for the Act being brought into force by proclamation. The description of the property as described by the proposed Bill is as follows: All or any lands and lands covered by water in the city of Toronto lying within the areas bounded on the west by the easterly limit of Yonge street, on the north by the southerly limit of the existing right of way of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from Yonge street eastward to the easterly limit of Berkeley street, and by the southerly limit of the existing right of way of the Grand Trunk Railway Company from the aforesaid limit of Berkeley street eastward to the southerly prolongation of the limit between lots 8 and 9 on the south side of Mill street, formerly Front street, according to a plan of the Toronto hospital property filed number 108 in the registry office for the said city, on the east by the said southerly prolongation of the limit between the said lots 8 and 9, and on the south by a line drawn along the southerly limits of water lots granted by the Crown to Gooderham and Worts and to William Good-erham, and by the new or present Windmill line, such boundary limits of the lands of the Crown. Also the whole or any part of the northerly one hundred and fifty feet of the lands and lands covered by water, granted to the National Iron Works, Limited, by the said city of Toronto, by deed dated the 21st day of August, 1909. The draft Bill has been approved by the Canadian Pacific Railway Cumpany, the Grand Trunk Railway Company, the Toronto Harbour Commission, the corporation of the city of Toronto, and the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


SATURDAY SITTINGS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. L. BORDEN moved:

That this House shall meet on Saturday the 16th instant and on all Saturdays until the end of the session, the hours of sitting and the order of precedence for business shall be the same as on Fridays.

Topic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

The motion

that the House should sit On Saturday as a rule is not brought down until all the Government programme has been laid upon the table. The programme is still incomplete, in this at all events, that the Supplementary Estimates have not yet been laid before the House. If that were all, I would not object to sitting on Saturday, because I am as anxious as anybody else to facilitate the ending of the work we have on hand. I am not aware, however, that that is all; perhaps my right hon. friend has other things to bring down. But, even aside from that, there is objection to sitting on Saturday.

As the season is far advanced, I do not object to the taking of Saturday as a sitting day; but I would suggest to my hon. friend that at all events we should not sit tomorrow. The notice that we have had has been too short; only yesterday we heard

for the first time that it was the intention of the Government to sit to-morrow and the following Saturdays. I interpose this objection to our being called upon to sit to-morrow that many members of the House, myself included, have made other engagements for that day. If we have, however, notice that we shall sit the next and following Saturdays, hon. gentlemen will be able to make arrangements accordingly. I hope therefore that my right hon. friend will modify his motion in order that it may take effect not from to-morrow but from the following Saturday.

Topic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

I appreciate what my

right hon. friend has said with regard to laying the programme of the Government before the House, but I am not aware of anything else at the moment which is to be brought down except the Supplementary Estimates. So far as sitting on Saturday is concerned, I hope that my right hon. friend will not press his objection. I shall be very glad to arrange that nothing shall be taken up on Saturday except matters of a non-controversial character; indeed, nothing to which my right hon. friend has any objection. I think we shall make some progress in that way. As to how long we shall sit on Saturday, I shall be prepared to meet the views of hon. gentlemen on the other side of the House. I think we can get some work done without any detriment to the public interest in the absence of those gentlemen who have already made *other arrangements. If that would meet the views of my right hon. friend, I would be glad if the motion would pass at it is.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

In view of this explanation, I shall not interpose my objection. I understand from my right hon. friend that he does not contemplate bringing up during the remainder of the session anything more than the Estimates. As to the business of the House to-morrow. I am quite satisfied that we should take up noncontentious matters and expedite business as much as possible.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

If my right hon. friend will give me a memorandum of what he thinks may conveniently be taken up tomorrow, I shall be very glad to meet his views.

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Motion agreed to.


THE FARMERS BANK.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I have received several letters this morning inquiring about the

position of the Government with regard to the depositors of the banks I have already named-La Banque du Peuple, the Ville Marie bank and La Banque St. Jean. I would urge upon my hon. friend to get a list of the depositors of these banks before we proceed with the Farmers Bank Bill.

Topic:   THE FARMERS BANK.
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CON

William Thomas White (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. W. T. WHITE:

The request that my hon. friend prefers this morning is similar to that which he made within the last day or so. I find that we have not in the department any list of the depositors of the banks in question, and I am not sure that we shall be able to obtain one. My deputy has, however, communicated with the liquidator of one or more of these banks with a view to seeing whether or not such a list can be obtained. I shall not promise it to my hon. friend, because I am not certain that we can obtain it. At all events, the matter is having consideration.

Topic:   THE FARMERS BANK.
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DEATH OF HON. F. D. MONK.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister) :

Before the Orders of the Day are

called, it is my painful duty to announce to the members of the House the death of the Hon. Frederick Debartzch Monk, who for many years was a member of this House and who was also a member of the present Administration. I met Mr. Monk for the first time in 1896, when we came here as members of the Parliament elected in that year, and from that time up to the present I have, as hon. members know, been associated very closely with him in public affairs and have also during that time had the very great privilege of enjoying hi3 personal friendship. I am happy to say that although sometimes there was a marked difference of opinion between us with regard to public questions and although that difference did result in his retirement from the Government more than a year ago, these differences never interfered in the slightest degree with the full friendship which always existed between us. Mr. Monk was a man of very distinguished qualities. He was an eminent constitutional lawyer, a great parliamentarian, a man of high ability and a commanding figure in Parliament and in public affairs. His character and his temperament in some respects were not suited to public life, for the reason that he was a man of singularly sensitive disposition, much more sensitive than, perhaps, those who did not know him inti-

mately may have realized. His course throughout his public career was marked by a high sense of duty and a desire to discharge to the utmost of his ability what he conceived to be his duty to the people of this country. His death leaves a great blank in the public life of Canada and no one mourns it more than I do. For many weeks and even months past it has been known that he was not likely to recover from the illness which confined him to his house. I am sure that, in common with all the members of this House and with all the people of this country who knew him, I can assure those of his family who survive him that they have in this loss the most profound sympathy of the Parliament of Canada and of the people of this country.

Topic:   DEATH OF HON. F. D. MONK.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Mr. Speaker, the sad intelligence which has just been conveyed to the House by my right hon. friend was not altogether unexpected, because, as he has stated, foT many months and even for many years past Mr. Monk had been in failing health and his recovery was not hoped for, although the end has come, perhaps, more suddenly than we had reason to suppose it would. Those of us who knew Mr. Monk-it was my privilege to know him almost from the days of his youth-are aware that the qualities that have been attributed to him by my right hon. friend he had in abundance. It is perhaps not generally known that his failing health can be traced back to the day when he lost a most charming wife, who had been to him not only a friend and companion but a most valuable advisor as well. I do not suppose that he ever fully recovered from the blow which he then suffered. Mr. Monk was well known in Quebec as belonging to a family which has been the adornment of the Bench and of the public life of ouir province. He was himself endowed in many ways with the talents of his distinguished father, and I agree with my right hon. friend that in temperament and ability he was more suited to the duties of the Bench than to participation in public life.

Everybody who saw Mr. Monk in this House will share my conviction that, if it had been his lot to be on the Bench, as his father was, he would have added great dignity to that position, and would have brought to the discharge of the duties devolving upon him commanding ability as a jurist and wide experience as a con-

st-itutional lawyer. Speaking on behalf of those who sit on this side of the House, and whose misfortune it was to have to differ from him upon many questions, I can say that in conveying to his family the condolence of his friends, the right hon. Prime Minister can also, in the same degree, convey the condolence of his opponents.

Topic:   DEATH OF HON. F. D. MONK.
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May 15, 1914