March 13, 1914

TRANSATLANTIC MAIL SERVICE.


On the Orders of the Day being called;


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX:

I wish to ask the Postmaster General in regard to the Toronto Postal Gude, which is issued every week, or every month. I quote from a letter which I received from a correspondent who is known to my hon. friend:

I enclose you a copy of the Monthly Postal Guide for this city issued by the Post Office. You will see that they have now discontinued giving the dates of the sailings of the New York ships. I had my clerks inquire at the post office today as to the New York sailings. He was told that they had no information on the subject and he could no doubt get it from the steamship agencies.

I do not intend to raise a debate on this question, but I would ask my hon. friend, will he not see to it that the Postal Guide wil] give the dates of sailings of New York steamers. I understand the department favours the Canadian route, which is natural. At the same time, any Canadian correspondent may route his letters via New York, and if the Postal Guide gave the dates of sailings it would be a material help in many cases.

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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

I do not pretend to

speak by the book, but I am under the impression that we are not able to ascertain the New York sailings any more than we have been able to ascertain the Canadian sailings.

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LIB
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

We have had them

quite lately, il can state with fair assurance of accuracy, though without being too sure, that the reason tne New York sailings are not included is that we could not get them. It is only fair that the public should have the New York sailings as well as the others so that correspondents may direct their letters via New York if they

desire to do so. I will call the attention of my officers to the matter.

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SUPPLY.


The House in Committee of Supply, Mr. Blomdin in the Chair. Trade and Commerce-Salaries, rents, wages and contingencies under the Canada Grain Act, $800,000.


CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

This vote is as against

$400,000 last year. On its face it is an increase of $400,000. But nearly the whole of that increase is due to the fact that we have to advance money in the operation of the Government elevator, which is turned in when the payments are made as the grain goes out of the warehouse. It is simply a matter of book-keeping, but as we had not the money in hand, we had to get an advance from the Finance Department running to about $300,000 or' $320,000. The other $80,000 is due to the larger expenses of all the different .services of the Grain Commission and its employed force.

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LIB
CON
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

How much of last season's crop has passed through that elevator? It was in full operation during the

whole movement of the crop, I understand?

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CON
LIB
CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

3,250,000 bushels. The

working capacity would be somewhere up to 3,000,000 bushels. This year, because the quality of the grain has been so different from that of the preceding year, the elevators have worked pretty well up to capacity.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

As I understand it, the

purpose in view in the construction of this elevator was to exercise some measure of control on the part of the Government over the handling of grain at that particular terminal in the interest of the public, in fact in the interest of the producer.

I would like the minister to give any information he can as to the result of the operation in that direction.

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

I suppose the minister is bound to maintain that the operation of the Government elevator has been about as nearly perfect as the operation of an elevator could be. The Government has had not only supervision but control, and, consequently, that supervision which control gives, which is, of course, a better supervision than can be exercised by simple inspection and supervision without control. As to how it has operated, I suppose a conclusion in that regard could be reached in several ways. In the first place, with reference to the general conditions so far as those who use the elevators-the sellers and purchasers of the' grain-are concerned, in all respects the year has been a very favourable and satisfactory one. There have been less complaints than previously, and there has been a general satisfaction, I think, with the inspection and the grading, not only in Canada but in the old country as well, where these different grades have their significance. The Government operation of the elevator has been of service to the whole giain business because the Government and its officers have got that knowledge with regard to actual operation that they never could get simply by the supervision of an elevator owned and operated by

some one else. It has enabled the Grain Commission and the Government officers, by being on the inside of the operations, to get a knowledge of them that they did not possess before. That knowledge is not only good in itself, but it is valuable as a means of checking other elevators that are under the supervision of, but not owned and operated by, the Government.

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CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

Is it under contemplation to erect any government-owned elevators at any point on lake Huron or the Georgian Bay?

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CON

March 13, 1914