February 27, 1914

PRIVATE BILLS.

FIRST READINGS.


Bill No. 86, to incorporate The Canadian Alberta Railway Company.-Mr. Warnock. Bill No. 87, to incorporate The Erie and Ontario Railway Company.-Mr. Lalor. Bill No. 88, respecting The London and Lake Erie Railway and Transportation Company.-Mr. Marshall. Bill No. 89, respecting The University of Saskatchewan, and to change its name to ' The University of Emmanuel College.'- Mr. McKay.


REPORT.


Report of the Penitentiaries of Canada for the year ended March 31, 1913.-Hon. C. J. Doherty.


INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.


Right Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 90, to amend an Act relating to the establishment and expenses of the International Joint Commission under the Waterways Treaty of January 11, 1909. He said: This Bill is to make some very minor changes in the Act. The Secretary of State for External Affairs is substituted for the Minister of Public Works, and some slight change is made in the clause relating to the expenses of the commission, 'but not in such a way as to increase the amounts already appropriated. The reason for the change is that proceedings before the International Joint Com-



mission concern various departments from time to time, and occasionally more than one department, and it has been found not only convenient but necessary to detach a special officer for the purpose of watching these proceedings and safeguarding the interests of the country. For that reason Mr. Stewart, chief of the Hydrographic Survey was selected. He was appointed by Order in Council, as a temporary measure, to devote his whole time to the consideration of these cases, and he has been very fully occupied. In the United States they have a better system for that purpose than we have. All these matters are dealt with by a board of military engineers; they go to the War Department as a matter of course. We have not any corresponding organization which is so readily available; but we hope to find some more effective means of seeing that the interests of the country are properly safeguarded in these proceedings, some of which are of great importance in many respects. Some have so affected the interests of the provinces that they have been represented by counsel before the commissioners.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Do I understand that the principal object of the Bill is to place the work under the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs?

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

To have the Department of External Affairs take charge, as it were, of all these applications, so that it can communicate with the various departments and see that they are attending to the matter. Sometimes, when more than one department is concerned, that seems to be absolutely necessary; otherwise there is a lack of co-ordination of effort.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

When is the Pecuniary Claims Commission to sit in Washington?

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

My colleague the Postmaster General tells me that it will sit almost at once-that the British Commissioner is leaving to-morrow for Washington.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.
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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time. .CIVIL SERVICE APPOINTMENTS.


CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. L. P. PELLETIER:

I desire to call the attention of the House to an answer given to a question placed on the Order Paper by the hon. member for Russell (Mt. Mur.phy), asking how many persons have

[Mr. Borden. 1

been appointed to the outside Civil Service since October, 1911, without having passed competitive examinations. This question was answered by the Secretary of State, who stated that 69 persons were appointed to the Post Office Department. I want to say that this answer has not come from the Post Office Department, but was prepared by the Civil Service Commissioners. To prevent any misunderstanding, I want to say that the number of persons who were' appointed as technical officers should have been stated as four. Sixty-nine persons were appointed to lower grade positions, such as messengers, porters and packers, under section 22, for which a competitive examination was not required.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS COMMISSION.
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CONSOLIDATION OF FISHERIES ACTS.


Hon. D. J. HAZEN (Minister of Marine and Fisheries) moved the second reading of Bill No. 71, to consolidate and amend the Acts respecting Fisheries and Fishing. He said: I explained this Bill pretty much in detail on the first reading. I am now moving the second reading with a view to having the Bill referred to the Select Standing Committee on Marine and Fisheries. Motion agreed to, Bill read the second time, and referred to the Select Standing Committee on Marine and Fisheries.


SUPPLY.


The House in Committee of Supply. Mr. Blondin in the Chair. Salaries and allowances to lig-htkeepers, $450,000.


LIB

George William Kyte

Liberal

Mr. KYTE:

Does the department contemplate increasing the salaries of the light-keepers in the near future?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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February 27, 1914