February 20, 1914

FIRST READINGS OF BILLS. PRIVATE BILLS.


Bill No. 78, respecting the patent of Auto Wheels, Limited.-Mr. Fisher. Bill No. 79, to incorporate The Bruce Peninsula Railway Company.-Mr. Mid-dlebro.



Bill No. 80, respecting The Canadian Northern Railway Company.-Mr. W. H. Sharpe. Bill No. 81, to incorporate The Canadian Press Association.-Mr. H. Clark. Bill No. 82, respecting The Kettle Valley Railway Company.-Mr. Green.


REPORT.


Criminal Statistics for the year ended September 30, 1912. (Appendix to Report of Minister of Trade and 'Commerce for the year 1912.)-Mr. Foster,


LOAN COMPANIES.


Hon. G. H. PERLEY (for the Minister of Finance) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 83, respecting Loan Companies. He said: This Bill is on the lines of the Trust Companies' Bill already introduced. The object is to secure uniformity in the charters of these companies. There is a provision for compulsory audit and for returns being forwarded to the Minister of Finance. It is intended that this Bill * should go to the Banking and Commerce Committee, along with the Trust Companies' Bill, so that both may be considered there. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time. '


CANADIAN PEACE CENTENARY ASSOCIATION.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


CON

William George Weichel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. G. WEICHEL (North Waterloo):

I would ask the Prime Minister if it is the intention of the Government to grant assistance to the Canadian Peace Centenary Association. This association is creating unbounded enthusiasm throughout Canada, and its laudable work in the interests of international peace should, in my estimation, receive encouragement.

Topic:   CANADIAN PEACE CENTENARY ASSOCIATION.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister):

On June 5, 1913, a somewhat similar question to that now asked by my hon. friend (Mr. Weichel) was asked by the hon. member for Welland (Mr. German), who has taken a worthy interest in this important subject. The Canadian Peace Centenary Association had then been in existence for upwards of a year, under the presidency of Sir Edmund Walker, of Toronto, and had done valuable work of a preparatory nature. I find on that date I said in part:

While the Canadian Peace Centenary Association is an unofficial body, the Government

strongly sympathizes with and approves ot its object and purpose of promoting good will and peace between the nations of the world. The Government is disposed to give favourable con sideration to a grant such as that mentioned in the Question in case similar action should be taken in other countries.

That statement still holds good so far as this Government is concerned. Indeed, this Government is disposed to go a step further. The cause which the Canadian Peace Centenary Association and the corresponding bodies in the United Kingdom and the United States have set before them is one with which we are -warmly sympathetic. It is a triumph of humanity that during a century of rapid development, despite the existence of serious international differences and problems, the British Empire and the United States have found wiser and more humane methods of adjusting differences than the arbitrament of war. We welcome the achievement of a century of peace, and hope that it will prove to be but the first century of peace, the forerunner of a long series stretching into the future as far as human anticipation can trust itself.

The Government is informed that during the eight or nine months which have elapsed since I made my statement last year active organizing work has been carried on by the Canadian Peace Centenary Association. An organizing secretary has been appointed, offices have been opened, visits have been made to important centres in every province of the Dominion, and every necessary preparation for the holding of an adequate celebration a year hence has been made. It is gratifying to note that the organizing secretary, Mr. E. H. Soam-mell, reports that the response to the efforts of the association has been exceedingly cordial in the numerous centres visited. Strong local committees have been formed, valuable assistance has been rendered by the press, and in general public opinion has manifested an encouraging interest and friendliness. I understand that similar work also has been done in the United Kingdom and in the United States in particular. I am informed that a Bill appropriating a sum of money for the purposes of the celebration is now pending in the United States Congress.

In answer t-o my hon. friend from North Waterloo (Mr. Weichel), I beg to say that, subject to the approval of His Royal Highness the Governor General, it is the purpose of the Government to insert in the Supplementary Estimates to be introduced

this session the sum of $25,000 for the purpose of defraying the preliminary expenditures incurred in the work of organization.

Topic:   CANADIAN PEACE CENTENARY ASSOCIATION.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Anything

which tends towards the maintenance of peace between Canada and the United States should undoubtedly receive the commendation of the Canadian Government and the Canadian Parliament. Perhaps my right hon. friend would consider that the improvement of our trade relations with the United States would also be con? ducive to peace.

Topic:   CANADIAN PEACE CENTENARY ASSOCIATION.
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

We are doing that every

day.

Topic:   CANADIAN PEACE CENTENARY ASSOCIATION.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mir. BORDEN:

I am sure that from the standpoint of the United States trade relations are really very excellent, because our importations from the United States have been increasing year by year.

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THE FRANKING PRIVILEGE.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

The matter is absolutely new to me. I am sure that the members of the Press Gallery always have a hearty welcome when they come to see me. I will make inquiries; their complaints will be heard and their grievances attended to.

Topic:   THE FRANKING PRIVILEGE.
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OCEAN RATES COMMISSION.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


February 20, 1914