February 13, 1914

UNITED STATES POTATO EMBARGO.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Pius Michaud

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

Will the Minister of

Agriculture (Mr. Burrell) please say if he has received information with regard to the embargo placed upon the importation of potatoes to the United States from Canada?

Topic:   UNITED STATES POTATO EMBARGO.
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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. MARTIN BURRELL (Minister of Agriculture):

I cannot give my hon. friend much information on that subject. The embargo-it is practically an embargo, as the regulations under it amount to almost total exclusion-has not been modified in any important respect so far as it affects Canada. We have been in correspondence, and as soon as there is anything definite, I shall be glad to let my hon. friend know.

Topic:   UNITED STATES POTATO EMBARGO.
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COMMUTATION OF THE DEATH SENTENCE.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. C. J. DOHERTY (Minister of Justice) :

If in order at this time, I desire to make a statement with reference to some observations made yesterday by the right hon. leader of the Opposition (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) with regard to commutation in certain cases in which persons in the western provinces, have been sentenced to death.

These observations of my right hon. friend were based upon statements in the report of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. As I had occasion to point out last year- when a motion was made for the production of papers in a case of application for clemency, the rule, in England, as I understand it, is, not to give the reasons which influenced the advice as to clemency. I am not unaware that there have been cases in this country, I understand, which have been treated as exceptions, and in which papers have been brought down. I have no desire, in making any statement at the present moment, to so make it as to preclude, if it should be desired, debate upon the question whether this is a proper matter for discussion upon the circumstances of the cases themselves. If such debate is not desired, and if the rules of the House, will permit, I should like to make my statement at the present moment.

Topic:   COMMUTATION OF THE DEATH SENTENCE.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

According to the rules

of the House, a debate could hardly take place with no question before the Chair. If the minister wishes to make an explanation and the House is willing to grant leave, I have no objection.

Topic:   COMMUTATION OF THE DEATH SENTENCE.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I fear that

such a statement of fact as the minister indicates is likely to be controversial. It would be better to make it on motion to go into Committee of Supply.

Topic:   COMMUTATION OF THE DEATH SENTENCE.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I understand that it

could not be taken up now, except by consent, and for that reason I suggested I would be ready to bring the matter forward at some other stage when my statement, which might be the subject of debate, could be considered.

Topic:   COMMUTATION OF THE DEATH SENTENCE.
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PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

I desire to repeat an inquiry I made yesterday when the Minister of Public Works was not present. I would like to be furnished with the authority for an alleged interview with myself which he read to the House the other day.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

The hon. member for Edmonton seems determined, if he possibly can, to stir up a certain amount of trouble, and of course, if my hon. friend stirs up that trouble, then he will have only himself to blame.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

I rise to a point of order.

I protest against the hon. gentleman suggesting that I want to stir up trouble, f

asked a civil question, and I am entitled to a civil answer.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EOGEES:

I shall certainly be

pleased to give my hon. friend a very civil answer indeed, and it is this: I .certainly

would not at any time, in this House or elsewhere, undertake to make any assertion were I not conscious that it was absolutely correct and in accordance with the facts. When asked the other day, when I was making this statement, for the authority upon which I based it, I did not then have in mind its exact source, and I was unable to give it to my hon. friend. But on looking the matter up I find that I was simply repeating words which have already been placed upon ' Hansard.' As far back as the year 1906, when this matter was discussed in the House by the right hon. the Prime Minister of to-day, then leader of the Opposition, the question arose, of' the interference of the staff under the Administration of my hon. friend, then Minister of the Interior, in elections in the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta. The Prime Minister of to-day, in dealing with that matter, first of all, quoted the unanimous resolution that was agreed to by the House in respect of the action of officials in connection with elections. After quoting this, resolution he went on to say:

That resolution, accepted by both political parties, accepted by the Prime Minister, was passed by this House-much to the regret as I observed at the time, of the Minister of the Interior. This is what the Minister of the Interior said: * They have the power of speech, and

therefore they are entitled to express their political opinions. They are entitled to express them to homesteaders; they are entitled to express them to men under their control; they are entitled to go upon public platforms and express them; they are entitled to express them as presidents and officers of Liberal organizations.'

That is the idea of the Minister of the Interior as to the way in which a solemn resolution of this House, unanimously passed, should be observed by himself and by his officers in the West, and these officers felt very much encouraged. We do not know how many feats of daring they performed; we do not know to what extent their efforts along certain lines have prevailed in the West. But we know that the curtain has been lifted just a little in one or two places, and we have a slight idea of the wonderful things which the officers of the Interior have accomplished in bringing about that endorsement.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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LIB
CON
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

I wish to interrupt my

hon. friend to say that he has incorrectly stated the position.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

I would like to know in what respect I am incorrect?

Topic:   PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS AND DOMINION OFFICIALS.
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February 13, 1914