February 3, 1914

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICIALS.


Mr. SPEAKER informed the House that he had directed the Clerk of the House to lay upon the table his recommendation and the report of the Clerk in regard to the promotion in grade of Mr. A. E. Horton, Clerk of the Sessional Papers and of the Joint Committee on the Printing of Parliament.


CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN moved:

That the recommendation of His Honour the Speaker laid upon the table of the House on Thursday, the 22nd day of January, respecting the appointment of Mr. Francis H. Gisborne as parliamentary counsel, the promotion in grade of Mr. A. G. Troop of the Law Branch, of the appointment of Mr. J. L. Godwin as assistant in the Votes and Proceedings Office, and of the appointment of Mr. Joseph Smith as chief of stenographers to members, be concurred in, the

salary attached to the promotion of Mr. A. G. Troop and the appointments of Messrs. Godwin and Smith to begin as of the first day of the present session of Parliament.

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Motion agreed to.


HOUSE OF COMMONS POST OFFICE.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I have a question to

direct to the Postmaster General with reference to the post office in the House of Commons, although perhaps the matter does not come directly under his control. The hon. gentleman must have received within the last few days complaints from some hon. members that obscene literature is being distributed in the boxes of the members, and that without any stamp and without any frank. I know the Postmaster' General is not responsible, but I point out to him that the distribution of obscene literature in such a manner is very objectionable. I do not know how it is introduced into the post office boxes, but I am quite sure, Mr. Speaker, that if you saw some of the leaflets which have been distributed recently, you would consider them very objectionable.

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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

The post office in the House of Commons is under the direction of Mr. Speaker, and not under the control of my department. In the Post Office Department, even when obscene literature is stamped, we always stop it passing through the mails. So far as the post office in the House of Commons is concerned, we may rest assured, Mr. Speaker, that you will attend to this matter.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

This is the first I have

heard of this matter, and I shall take a very early opportunity of instructing the postmaster of the House of Commons with*

regard to it.

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LIB

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND RAILWAY.


On the motion of Mr. Borden for Committee of Supply:


LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. J. J. HUGHES:

I wish again to call the attention of the Prime Minister and of the Minister of Railways to the grievance of which I complained on Friday last. From the remarks of the Minister of Railways I would gather that he is not quite familiar with the increased rates and the local conditions on the Prince Edward Island railway. Of course I am not surprised at that. When I mentioned that the rate of freight

on cordwood for a short distance was $7 a car, he seemed to think it was not very large. The fact is that the capacity of the cars on the Prince Edward Island railway is only about half as great as the capacity of the cars on the Intercolonial railway. Taking that fact into consideration the hon. minister will see that the charges on the main line of the Intercolonial would be about $12 to $14 per car. The rate in my province is prohibitive and is not in the interest of the railway. There are similar rates on lumber of all kinds. From the letter which I read on Friday last, it will be seen that the rates on many other articles are prohibitive.

I have been informed by gentlemen supporting the Government that apparently it is of little use bringing matters of this kind to the notice of the management at Moncton; that they do not seem to take seriously suggestions from business men. So far as the management in Prince Edward Island is concerned, it does not seem to have any power at all.

The Prime Minister will remember that before the last election, in the discharge -of his duty as leader of the Opposition, he came to our province and sympathized with the people there with reference to the very great difficulties they had in matters of .transportation. He certainly made statements to the effect that if he came into power he would have some remedy applied, and no one understood him to say that if he *came into power the rates would be increased. I am sure that the Prime Minister appreciates tne responsibility of any statement that he might have made under such circumstances ancL that he would not wish to mislead the people. This matter is more serious than the Minister of Railways or the Prime Minister appears to think. I am surprised that the members for Prince Edward Island supporting the Government are not pressing this matter more strenuously.

Most of the articles transported over the Prince Edward Island railway are not handled by the railway officials at all; they are loaded and unloaded by the people. Mixed freight and passenger trains run anyhow, whether freight is offered or not, and it would be very little extra expense to the railway to haul these cars which are loaded and unloaded by others. If the railway is to be of any service to the people, this matter should receive some *consideration from the Government. It may seem a small matter among the many (subjects that come before the Prime Minis-

ter, but I would again ask him at least to look into it.

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I think the hon. gentleman is trying to mislead the people when he makes the statement that the cars on the Prince Edward Island railway do not carry over half what the cars on the main line do. This, I say, is not true, more than that, the hon. gentleman has never told the House and the country that we have cut out the third rate for the ferry across. This has never been done before, and is more in the interest of the people of Prince Edward Island than anything else we can do, until we get the ferry established. He has brought forward only one instance in which he says there is a hardship. In my opinion, he has not made out his case, because I know that the cars on the Prince Edward Island railway carry more than half what the cars on the main line do. If he has any other instances to give, I shall be glad to instruct the management to look into them.

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LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. J. J. HUGHES:

Will the minister tell me the capacity of the cars on the Prince Edward (Island railway and the capacity of the cars on the Intercolonial railway? Then wre shall know whether my statement is true or not.

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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

You made the state ment. *

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SUPPLY.


The House in Committee of Supply, Mr Blondin in the Chair. Civil Government Department of Customs, $330,987.50.


LIB

February 3, 1914