January 27, 1914

CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

That certainly was the

impression we had on this side of the House and I had heard nothing to the contrary until the hon. gentleman rose to his feet. Of course, it means that if it is to proceed now the arrangement which was made falls to the ground. That is a bad thing for this one arrangement but it is a much worse thing for the possibility of arrangements in the future. I should like to invite my right

hon. friend's attention to what was the understanding on this side and see what can be done about it.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I am surprised to hear that there was an arrangement of that nature. I never heard of it. I do not think that any such arrangement has been made. I do not know but that an arrangement had been made to finish the debate on the present amendment, but I know of nothing beyond that.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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CON

John Stanfield (Chief Government Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STANFIELD:

To clear up this matter I would say that possibly there has been a little mistake. My understanding was that the vote was to be taken to-night. Perhaps I took too much out of that in accepting it to mean that the Address was to be settled.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER :

Mr. Neely moves,

seconded by Mr. MacNutt, that the debate be now adjourned.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER:

While I have been

disappointed, and I am sure gentlemen on this side have been disappointed, at the statement which has been made, I presume that the motion which was made by the hon. gentleman who has just taken his seat (Mr. Neely) means that there wili be a more or less extended debate on the amendment which he proposes to move. Under these circumstances I do not think it is best for us to beat our heads against a stone wall and remain for the small hours of the morning, but I would like my right hon. friend to give some intimation as to what time he thinks this discussion upon the Address may come to an end.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

We have no desire on this side of the House to prolong the discussion, but some of our friends want to speak on the question. I do not think the debate will be very much prolonged but I will not bind myself to any time. I would observe that there should be no misunderstanding between the two sides of the House especially in regard to anything that is agreed to by the hon. member for Colchester (Mr. Stanfield). I would take his word under any circumstances and I would be very glad myself to give him every opportunity in the same way. If my hon. friend from Colchester tells us that he understood that the debate was to be closed to-day I would agree at once, but surely there must be a misunderstanding.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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Motion agreed to, and debate adjourned. On motion of Hon. George E. Foster, the House adjourned at 12.05 a.m. Wednesday. Wednesday, January 28, 1914.


January 27, 1914