January 27, 1914

DOMINION LANDS ACT AMENDMENT.


Air. J. A. M. AIKINS (Brandon) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 28, to amend the Dominion Lands Act. He said: The present Dominion Lands Act approves of the principle and the policy of the complete alienation of water-powers, lands connected with water-powers, coal lands, coal, oil, quarry lands and gas lands from the people, and, I submit, to the detriment of the people. The purpose of this Bill is to prevent such alienation. I understand that it has been the general practice of the department in recent times not to alienate these lands, but to lease such lands under certain regulations made by the Governor in Council. But the regulations concerning the water-powers appear to me to be of such great importance that they ought to be first approved by Parliament before goina into operation, and amended only at the will of Parliament. Moreover, the statute as it now stands authorizes the homesteading and pre-emption of such lands, so that when the homestead conditions have been complied with and the rights of pre-emption arise, the surface rights become severed from the sub-surface rights, to the detriment of the owners of the sub-surface rights, and will prevent the profitable working of these rights. The purpose of this Bill is to remedy these defects. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


MONEY LENDERS ACT AMENDMENT.


Mr. HENRY H. STEVENS (Vancouver) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 28, to amend the Money Lenders Act. He said: The present Money Lenders Act applies a limitation to the rate of interest to be charged on loans the principal of which is under $500. The intention of this Bill is to extend this limitation to all loans. Another proposal is to reduce the rate of interest from 12 per cent to 10 per cent. Another feature is an amendment to the interpretation clause describing what a money lender is and making the clause-clear. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY.


Hon. FRANK COCHRANE (Minister of Railways and Canals) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 30, respecting the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company. He said: This is to extend the time for the' completion of the prairie section of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first, time.


NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY.


Hon. FRANK COCHRANE (Minister of Railways and Canals) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 31, respecting the National Transcontinental Railway. He said: The other Bill was for the extension of the time by Order in Council. This is to authorize the Governor in Council to extend it from time to time by Order in Council. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


NAVAL SERVICE ACT REPEAL BILL.


Mr. DAVID O. LESPERANCE (Mont-magny) moved for leave to introduce Bill



No. 32, to repeal the Act respecting the 'Naval Service of Canada.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICE ACT REPEAL BILL.
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CON

David Ovide L'Espérance

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LESPERANCE:

This is a Bill to repeal the Naval Service Act passed by the late Administration in 1910.

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICE ACT REPEAL BILL.
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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


MARITIME MAIL SERVICE.


On the Orders of the Day being called : Hon.. H. R. EMMERSON: I wish to ask the Postmaster General if some improvement can not be made in the method of transmission of mails to the eastern provinces. At present, if a letter directed to any point between Montreal and Moncton, or beyond Moncton, inclusive of Halifax and Sydney, is mailed in this city after three o'clock in the afternoon, it goes to Montreal by the afternoon or night train, remains there all the next day and then goes over the Intercolonial railway or the Canadian Pacific railway by the night train which leaves Montreal for points east. This mail matter should not be held twelve hours in Montreal. Letters mailed here in the evening should connect with the Maritime mail which leaves Montreal at 8.30 the next morning, thus reaching their destination in the eastern provinces fully twelve hours earlier than under the present arrangement. I have repeatedly brought this matter to the attention of my hon. friend and of his predecessor in office. This has been going on for a number of years, and it seems to me that it is time a remedy was applied. The mails are held in Montreal in order to be sent over the Canadian Pacific railway to the eastern provinces; they should go over the Intercolonial railway by the morning train, thus avoiding delay.


CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. L. P. PELLETIER (Postmaster General) :

The hon. member for Westmorland called my attention to this matter the other day, and I thought he was right. I brought the matter to the attention of my deputy. At first sight he thought that the hon. gentleman was wrong in his statement of facts, but I told him that my hon. friend was sure of his facts. I asked him to look into the matter so that I might be able to give the hon. member for Westmorland a proper answer. Since then Dr. Coulter has been unwell, and that is the reason why my hon. friend has not yet received an answer.

Topic:   MARITIME MAIL SERVICE.
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THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.

ADDRESS IN REPLY.


Consideration of the motion of Mr. H. F. McLeod for an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the proposed amendment thereto of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, resumed from Monday, January 26.


January 27, 1914