June 5, 1913

QUESTIONS.


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


LEVIS MILITARY PROPERTY.

LIB

Mr. BOURASSA:

Liberal

1. Has the lease of a house, consented to by the Minister of Militia and Defence of Canada, in favour of Prudent Bossd, in. the town of Levis, on the 11th of October, 1893, been cancelled ?

2. If so, (a) when, (b) why and (c) at whose request?

3. Was notice given to the tenant, in accordance with the terms of the said lease, that this lease would be cancelled?

4. Has Prudent Bosse always conformed to the terms of his lease?

5. Was the land leased, and such as described in the said lease, a portion of the land of the said Prudent Bosse?

6. (a) To whom has the said land been leased, (b) what are the qualifications or occupation and fc) place of residence of the new tenant, (d) what is the yearly rental? !

7. For what purpose is the leased land' used?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   LEVIS MILITARY PROPERTY.
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L-C

Mr. HUGHES (Minister of Militia): (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal-Conservative

1. Lease dated October 11, 1893, has been cancelled. There is no house on the property.

2. (a) April 1, 1913. (b) Under the condition of the lease that the Grown has the right to resume possession at any time, on demand, (c) Mr. Bernier, M.P.P.

3. Yes, on May 3, 1912.

4. Yes.

5. No. This land belongs to the Crown, and was transferred at Confederation to the control of the Dominion of Canada. It forms a portion of the military reserve at Levis.

6. (a) Mr. Odilon Roberge, (b) Occupation, butcher, (c) Residence, 109 St. George street, Levis, (d) $12 per annum, same rental as that formerly paid by Mr. BossA

7. Pasturage.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   LEVIS MILITARY PROPERTY.
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AMMON POSTMASTER.

LIB

Mr. EMMERSON:

Liberal

1. Has John Wilbur, postmaster at Ammon, Westmorland county, New Brunswick, been dismissed? If so, for what cause?

2. Were any charges preferred against him? If so, by whom, and what was their nature and purport?

3. Was any investigation held? If so, by whom ?

4. Has any one been appointed to succeed him? If so, who, and by whose recommendation?

5. Were any petitions respecting the matter received from residents of the locality? If so, what was the nature and purport thereof?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AMMON POSTMASTER.
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CON

Mr. PELLETIER: (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. No.

2. No.

3. 4 and 5. A petition was received asking for a change in the site and postmastership of the Ammon post office, and the inspector, having reported that the proposed site would better accommodate a larger number of the residents, the change in location was authorized, involving also a change in the postmastership.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AMMON POSTMASTER.
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MANITOBA LAND TITLES.

LIB

Mr. PROULX:

Liberal

1. What was the Governor General's pro-

clamation of July 15, 1870, in reference to land titles in Manitoba?

2. Is it tbe policy of the Department of the Interior to set up the Statutes of Limitation in order to bar the rights of the pioneer Selkirk settlers of Red River, who have been deprived of the means of protecting their civil rights through the suppression of the public records from the custody of the state, at the transfer in 1870, covering the period from 1812 to 1835?

3. Why does the department refer to the Exchequer Court the heirs of the pioneer Selkirk settlers, in the absence of the public records from the custody of the state?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MANITOBA LAND TITLES.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

There is no proclamation 'by the Governor General of July 15, 1870, known. The province of Manitoba did not exist at that date.

2. It is not known what rights there are.

3. The department does not refer to the Exchequer Court the heirs of the pioneer Selkirk settlers.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MANITOBA LAND TITLES.
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HAY AND STRAW GRADES.

LIB

Mr. BUCHANAN:

Liberal

1. Has the Government been asked to fix grades for hay and straw in western Canada?

2. If so, is it the intention of the Government to meet the request made in this regard? !

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   HAY AND STRAW GRADES.
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CON

Mr. PERLEY: (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. The Department of Trade and Commerce has received representations in connection * with the fixing of grades for hay and straw in western Canada.

2. The subject of fixing grades is now engaging the attention of the department.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   HAY AND STRAW GRADES.
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THE PEACE CENTENARY.

LIB

Mr. GERMAN:

Liberal

1. Is the Government aware that an International Conference has recently been held in the city of New York for the purpose of discussing methods of celebrating the centenary of the signing of the treaty of Ghent?

2. Does the Government contemplate the granting of aid towards the holding of such a celebration?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE PEACE CENTENARY.
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CON

Mr. BORDEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. The Government has received the following information from the officers of the Canadian Peace Centenary Association.

An International Conference took place in New York from~May 5 to May 9, between delegations representing the American Committee for the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of Peace between the United States and the British Empire; the British Committee for the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of Peace between the British Empire and the United States; and the Canadian Peace Centenary Association. In addition, it was attended by representatives of Australia, of Newfoundland and of the city of Ghent.

Mr. PROULX.

The delegates from the British Committee included: The Right Hon. Baron Wear-dale; the Right Hon. Earl Stanhope; the Hon. Sir Arthur Lawley, G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., K.C.M.G.; the Right Hon. Sir Herbert Maxrwell, P.C.; Hon. Neil Primrose, M.P., Mr. Moreton Frewen; Mr. Henry Vivian and Mr. H. S. Perris.

The delegates from the Canadian Peace Centenary Association were: Sir Edmund

Walker, C.V.O., LL.D.; Senator R. Dandu-rand; Mr. Travers Lewis, K.C., Mr. C. A. Magrath, Mr. C. F. Hamilton.

The delegates from the American Committee, who were more numerous, included Hon. Joseph H. Choate, Judge Alton B. Parker, Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, Mr. Nicholas Murray Butler, Mr. John D. Crim-mins, Dr. Thomas Nelson Page, Mr. Andrew Carnegie, Mr. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Mr. H. P. Judson, Mr. John A. Stewart, Mr. William Church Osborn, Mr. George Burleigh, Mr. George T, Wilson and Mr. W. B. Howland.

Australia was represented by Sir George H. Reid, G.C.M.G., High Commissioner for Australia; Newfoundland by Mr. Eugene H. Outerbridge; and the municipality of Ghent by M. C. deBruyen and M. Alphonse Van Werveke.

The delegates were given a cordial and sympathetic reception by the President of the United States, Mr. Wilson, by the VicePresident of the United States, Mr. Marshall; by the Secretary of State of the United States, Mr. Bryan; by Mr. Theodore Roosevelt, formerly President of the United States; by Mr. Clark, Speaker of the House of Representatives; and by Mr. Underwood, leader of the majority in the House of Representatives. The American Committee showed a zeal and interest in the movement which created a most favourable impression on all who came in contact with them.

The British and Canadian delegates received many courtesies and attentions from the United States Committee as well as from other prominent and representative citizens.

The Government understands that the proceedings of the conference, which were entirely harmonious, resulted in the passing of resolutions recommending a definite scheme of commemoration, partly by the erection of visible monuments, possibly of identical design; partly by the ceremonies attending the laying of the corner stone of these monuments, and partly by the establishment of lectureships scholarships and similar methods of diffusing correct information upon international relations.

The Canadian delegation has communicated full information with regard to the conference in a letter which is herewith laid on the table for the information of the House.

2. While the Canadian Peace Centenary Association is an unofficial body, the Government strongly sympathizes with and approves o! its object and purpose of promoting good will and peace between the nations of the world. The Government is disposed to give favourable consideration to a grant such as that mentioned in the question in case similar action should be taken in other countries.

The following is the letter referred to:

Canadian Peace Centenary Association.

Ottawa, May 24, 1913.

Sir,-The Canadian delegates have the honour to lay before you a statement of the events associated with the International Conference recently held in New York for the purpose of adopting a definite programme ifor the celebration oif the centenary of the sign-in s of the treaty of Ghent.

The delegation from the Canadian Peace Centenary Association was headed by Sir Edmund Walker, C.V.O., the president of tlie association. At the conclusion of the deliberations Sir Edmund Walker was obliged to proceed to Europe, having indeed, more than once postponed his sailing and dislocated his personal arrangements in order to discharge his duties as a member of the conference. In his absence the duty of making this report devolves upon the remaining members of the delegation.

The conference did not regard itself as a body authorized to determine with finality the questions before it, but rather as a meeting of delegations from parent bodies to which report must be made and to which all recommendations must be submitted. Ail business transacted and resolutions passed are conceived upon that basis.

The British delegation consisted of:- The Rt. Hon. Baron Weardale; the Rt). Hon. Earl Stanhope; The Hon. Sir Arthur Lawley, G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., K.C.M.G.; the Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert Maxwell, P.C., the Hon. Neil Primrose, M.P.; the Hon. C. T. Mills, M.P.; Mr. Shirley Benn. M.P.; Mr. J. Allen Baker, M.P.; Mr. Moreton Frewen; Mr. Henry Vivian, and Mr. H. S. Perris.

The American delegation, which was much larger, included: Mr. Joseph H. Chocate,

former American Ambassador to Great Britain, New Work; Judge Alton B. Parker, New York; the Hon. Robert Bacon, Boston; Mr. Henry Clews, New York; Mr. Cbauncey Depew, New Work; Mr. Howard D. Hadley Plattsburg, New York, Mr. Henry Fairfield Osborn, New York; Mr. William Church Osborn, New York; Dr. James Brown Scott, Washington; Bishop N. S. Thomas, Cheyenne, Wyoming; Mr. George William Burleigh, New York; Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia University. New York; Colonel Benehan Cameron, Raleigh, N.C.; Mr. Andrew Carnegie, New York; Mr. John D. Crimmins, New York; Mr. William Curtis Demorest, New York; Captain William D. Forbes, New York; Mr. Austin G. Fox, New York; Dr. E. R. L. Gould, New York; Hon. George Gray, Wilmington, Del.; Mr. VV. 0. Hart, New Orleans; Mr. Job E. Hedges, New York; Mr. William B. Howland, New York; Mr. Marcus M. Marks, New York; Dr. Thomas Nelson Page, Washington; Mr. George Foster

Peabody, New York; Dr. Louis Livingston Seaman, New York; Mr. Andrew B. Humphrey, New York; Dr. George F. Kunz, New York; Mr. Isaac N. Seligman, New York; Dr. Albert Shaw, New York; Mr. T. Kennard Thomson, New York; Dr. James L. Tryon, Boston; Mr. Cornelius Vanderbilt, New York; Mr. George T. Wilson New York; Mr. George W. Perkins, New York; Hon. Lyman J. Gage, Point Loma, Cal.; Mr. Harry P. Judson, Chicago; Mr. John A. Stewart, New York.

The Canadian delegates were; Sir Edmund Walker, C.V.O.; the Hon. Raoul Dandurand, P.C.; Mr. C. A. Magrath; Mr. Travers Lewis,

K.C., and Mr. C. F. Hamilton.

In addition, the Rt. Hon. Sir George H. Reid, P.C., G.C.M.G., High Commissioner for Australia, accompanied the British delegation; two" Belgian gentlemen, M.C. de Bruyen and M. Alphonse Van Werveke, represented the city of Ghent; and Mr. Eugene H. Outer-bridge was requested by the Prime Minister of Newfoundland, to represent that colony.

The proceedings of the conference began on May 5 and terminated on May 9. During their continuance the American committee constituted themselves the hosts of the visiting delegates, and discharged that function with the utmost generosity. Great interest was evinced in the conference while it sat in New York, an interest which in part took the form of a hospitality which culminated in a banquet held on the evening of May 9. The visiting delegates were afterwards conveyed to Boston, Washington, Philadelphia, Chicago and other cities, where flattering attentions were paid to them; the Canadian delegates were unable to visit all of these places. It may not be out of place to add that the newspapers of the United States devoted to the proceedings of the conference a degree of attention which we were assured was quite unusual; while there was much editorial comment, couched in terms of a gratifying friendliness.

We feel constrained to state that apart altogether from the abundant hospitality accorded us, we have every reason to feel gratified at the distinguished personnel and cordial disposition of the American committee. In New York Mr. Joseph H. Choate showed the most active interest in the conference, and on several occasions acted as its chairman; Judge Alton B. Parker, who was Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1908. attended the conference regularly, and Mr. Theodore Roosevelt, former president of the United States, at his home at Oyster Bay addressed and entertained the delegates in a most cordial manner. President Nicholas Murray of Columbia University was active in the work of the conference; Mayor Gaynor of New York formally welcomed the delegates in a cordial speech; Dr. Thomas Nelson Page, the well-known author, bore an active part in the deliberations; Mr. Carnegie, Mr. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Mr. Henry Clews, Mr. William Church Osborn, Mr. George W. Perkins, and Dr. Louis Livingston Seaman exerted themselves to make the conference a success. Other prominent men in New York who bore a part in the deliberations or otherwise showed interest were Mr. Walter H. Page, the new Ambassador to Great Britain,

public opinion everywhere that the time has come when international rivalries and differences, though numerous and severe, may be.settled without the carnage and the horrors! of war. Although it be unreasonable to disregard the possibility of conflict arising in the future, out of mutual or partial misun-: derstanding, yet we gratefully recognize that the chances of misunderstanding have been largely eliminated by the degree in which modern science has facilitated intercourse and accelerated communication. We are therefore encouraged to hope that the development of letters, science and the arts, of commerce, industry and finance, of mutual knowledge, trust and good feeling on the part of those who owe different allegiances and who speak different tongues, may profitably absorb the energy of mankind, as well as offer opportunity for the display of the noblest and' finest traits of mind an4 of character.

Great Britain .has been a colonizing nation, and the United States has drawn to its population various and powerful elements from different countries and different flags. Therefore, a century of peace between Great Britain and her dominions beyond the seas on the on el hand, and the United States on the other hand, touches directly both the interest and the imagination of every land to which Great Britain's sons have gone, as well as those of every nation from which the present day population of the United States has been drawn. Such a celebration will not only mark the close of a century of exceptional significance and importance, but it will call attention to an example and an ideal that we earnestly hope may be followed and pursued in the years to come. What nations have done, nations can do.

We respectfully request that His Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and the Secretary of State of the United States do transmit this invitation, through the proper world official channels, to the governments of the world, in order that both by participation of governments and by the co-operation of men of good-will in every land, this celebration may be so carried out as to mark not merely the close of one hundred years of peace between English speaking peoples, but the opening of what we sincerely trust will be a fresh era of peace and good-will between all nations of the world.

The International Boundary.

In addition to the foregoing, at a sub-committee meeting held between the delegates representing the United States and Canada, for the purpose of taking up the matter of appropriate marking of the international boundary in commemoration of the first hundred years of peace between the two nations, it was decided that suggestions he made to the organizations of the United States and Canada, as follows:-

That they urge upon their respective Governments -

(a) The erection of arches at the points where the proposed highways-Quebec and Miami in the east, and Los Angeles to Vancouver in the west- cross the international boundary.

(b) The erection of shafts at a few historical and prominent points upon or on each side of the boundary (which, in the latter

Mr. BOR') IN.

case, should be erected in the immediate vicinity of tlie boundary) at omn'-s to be selected hereafter. This might properly include water-gates on opposite sides of the Detroit river, near the city of Detroit.

(c) That such arches and shafts be briefly and suitably inscribed.

It was further felt that these outward and visible signs of the spirit of the occasion should not be restricted to the international boundary, but should also find a place in the great centres of population, often far distant therefrom, thus carrying the message of mutual good-will to the mass of both peoples.

It was urged before the sub-committee that an enduring monument in the shape of a memorial bridge he built across the Niagara river. This and other like projects appealed quite strongly to the sub-committee, but it felt that, involving as it does very large expenditures on the part of the governments of both countries, they might very properly be allowed to stand for further consideration until the respective committees shall have had greater opportunity to look more closely into these larger projects in accordance with the following resolution :-

' This sub-committee recommends that after the American and Canadian committees shall have decided upon a plan of celebration regarding boundary monuments, memorials and arches, a commits.'e of six, composed of three members from each of the respective committees, shall be appointed with instructions to consult experts in art, architecture and engineering with a view to the preparation of plans and the execution of the particular works to be undertaken.'

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE PEACE CENTENARY.
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STAFF OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Eight Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister) moved:

That the classification and organization of the staff of the House of Commons, as submitted to the House by His Honour the Speaker on the third day of June he ap+ proved and confirmed.

He said: I would refer hon. members to page 1428 of the Votes and Proceedings, where details covered by this resolution will be found. I propose to have an amendment made in that section of the resolution relating to the committees branch. The words ' and chief clerk of special committees ' appear in connection with the name of Mr. E. P. Hartney, examiner and registrar of Private Bills. I move that the words 1 and chief clerk of special committees ' be struck out.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STAFF OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I would suggest to my right hon. friend that it would be well to take the classification as we take the railway subsidies and go over the names one by one. There are some names as to which I would like to have some information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STAFF OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.
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June 5, 1913