May 31, 1913

THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES.


Rt. Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 240, to amend the Public Archives Act. He said: This Bill proposes a very slight amendment to chapter 4 of the statutes of 1912. It provides that: Unless otherwise ordered by the Governor in Council, the powers and duties of the minister under this Act shall not be exercised or discharged by deputy except so far as the Dominion Archivist is authorized to act for or as the deputy of the minister. It has been suggested that the archives should 'be created into a separate department, inasmuch as there is some difficulty in carrying on the business of the archives owing to the fact that its location is altogether separate from the Department of the Secretary of State, who is the minister of the department. This does not seem necessary; but at the same time it should be placed in such a position that the Archivist can, with the assistance of an accountant or other suitable officer, carry on the business of the archives with a much less amount of red tape as to very small transactions than has been necessary in the past.


LIB
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

He was accorded the rank and status of a deputy minister last year; but, as the archives was not created into a department, it has been necessary, every time the officers have required a small amount of stationery, a bottle of ink, or any trifling article of that kind, to make a requisition and get in touch with the Department of the Secretary of State. If they have desired to send out $50 or $100 to any of the men who are constantly employed in doing work for the archives in various parts of the country, there has been a good deal of delay and inconvenience. I am quite convinced that the arrangement now proposed will he attended with considerable advantage in the administration of all matters connected with the archives.

Topic:   THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES.
Permalink

Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


THE LATE MR. JAMES P. BROWN.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

Before the Orders of the Day are called, I think it only fitting that reference should be made to the untimely decease of one of our colleagues, who has been a member of this House for more than twenty-two years. I refer to Mr. Brown, the late member for Chateauguay. I am sure that all of us, irrespective of party, will join in conveying to the family and friends of the deceased our deep sympathy and our appreciation of his worth as a member of this House. It was not my privilege to know Mr. Brown very intimately, but I do know that he was highly respected on 'both sides of the House; that he was a man who gave very devoted and constant attention to his duties as a .member; and I am sure that his death is a loss not only to hon. gentlemen on the other side of the House, whose colleague more especially he was, but to the House as a whole. On 'behalf of the members on this side of the House, I beg to tender to hon. gentlemen on the other side as well as to the family and friends of the deceased, our very deep and appreciative sympathy on this occasion.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. JAMES P. BROWN.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I am grateful to my right hon. friend for the very kind words he has just spoken regarding the decease of our lamented friend and colleague, Mr. Brown. As my right ,hon. friend has stated, Mr. Brown was a highly respected member of this House. Although he did not take a very great part in our discussions, it was my privilege to know him for many years and to appreciate the soundness of his judgment, the integrity of his character, the firmness of his disposition, and the cordiality of his relations with his

friends and neighbours. He represented the county of Chateauguay, which contains a mixed population of Scottish and French descent, and he represented it to the satisfaction of all races. He was a man of broad sympathies, who could reach all races and creeds without giving offence to any whilst firmly maintaining his convictions. His departure from this life, as my hon. friend has said, will be a severe loss to his friends. I sincerely appreciate the kindness of the remarks my right hon. friend has offered, especially with regard to Mr. Brown's family, and it will be my privilege to convey to them the observations which have been made by the Prime Minister with regard to our late lamented friend and colleague.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. JAMES P. BROWN.
Permalink

RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

With regard to the railway subsidy resolutions, I asked my hon. friend the Minister of Railways yesterday for the correspondence he has on the subject. My hon. friend would simplify and expediate matters if he would bring down the correspondence and with everything concerned with the applications lay it on the table to-day.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

In reference to the

Canadian Northern, there is no correspondence.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

No. An application

was made verbally or personally, and it was worked out by the auditor of the company and the auditor of the department. That has all been done personally.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

There are of course statements as to the financial position of the road, as to the amount of capital invested, the amount which has been raised, and matters of that kind. Would the right hon. gentleman like to have some of these statements in advance?

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

No. If there is no correspondence, I cannot ask for what does not exist. We shall have more information when we take up these resolutions in committee on Monday.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

The correspondence

with reference to the others will be laid on the table to-day.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

There are some questions asking for information in regard to the Canadian Northern. As it might be possible for my hon. friend to overlook these questions, I suggest that as they are important, he be prepared to answer them on Monday.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I can answer them all but one. In fact, I have the answers here

now. The one exception is in reference to the guarantees and subsidies; we have not got them all. Many of the lines are branch lines and having charters from the provinces, and subsidized by the provinces, by guarantee or otherwise. We have no record of them, and I was going to ask that that question be changed into a notice of motion for a return.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

This is hardly the time to discuss these questions.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
Permalink

CONVEYANCE OF LETTER CARRIERS.

May 31, 1913