May 30, 1913


House in Committee of Supply. (Mr. Deputy Speaker in the Chair.) Arts, agriculture and statistics-exhibitions, $375,000.


LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Last night we passed this item which we did not discuss at all. The hon. minister said that we could ask any questions concerning it at a future session of the committee. It would perhaps save time and a lot of questions if he would just give us a little idea of these exhibitions; what work he is carrying on; if this vote has anything to do with the vote for the Toronto exhibition; what is included in it; who is in charge of the exhibits; what are the exhibits; what success we are having, and if weare getting any returns that he can

see directly or if they are indirect. Exhibitions properly conducted are the best advertising we can have foT Canada. What are included in the exhibits-manufactured products or natural products? A few explanations would be acceptable, so that we may know what the money is for.

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EDITION


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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. MAETIN BUEEELL (Minister of Agriculture):

This special vote is confined to large internal exhibitions, and is not for exhibitions in Canada itself. There is a vote for exhibitions every year. There is in the main estimates a vote of $50,000 for the Dominion exhibition which goes from province to province in turn. There are occasionally special votes. Last year there was a vote of $100,000 towards the Toronto National Exhibition, to pay for a building to house the exhibits of all the provinces. As I have said this vote has nothing to do with exhibitions of that kind, but it is to be confined to what we may call international exhibitions where Canada exhibits on a very large scale her natural resources and products. The first of these exhibitions was held in Stockholm in 1897. Since that time, fifteen or twenty exhibitions have been held, the last being the Festival of Empire in London. The money of this vote is largely to be for the exhibits at the International Exhibition in Ghent, in Belgium. The same man is in charge who has been in charge for many years, Colonel Hutchison, who is well qualified for the work and has a natural genius for exhibition work. A considerable sum will also be necessary for preliminary expenses in connection with the Panama Exhibition in 1915, for which we shall have to begin to get ready before the end of the present year. The Ghent Exhibition is just opening.

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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I hope the names of the two commissioners published are correct, Mr. Lafontaine and Mr. Plante.

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BUEEELL:

Nothing has been decided on that point. No assistants have been sent as yet. In regard to that, the only object in sending anybody from this side was not to represent Canada but to strengthen the staff in Belgium of Frenchspeaking people.

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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I do not know what the particular qualifications of Mr. Lafontaine may be, but as regards Mr. Plante, if my hon. friend will appoint him, I am sure he will find in him a man most conversant with the resources of our country and quite a creditable representative of Canada. At the time we had the exhibition at Brus-sells three years ago, Canada was never so well advertised in Europe as by our exhibit there. If my hon. friend could only reproduce what we had at Brussels-and I think he could improve on that-he would confer a great benefit on this country. I must say that in Mr. Hutchinson, and his immediate staff, Mr. Hains, for instance, we have most competent officers. At Brussels, I myself visited the exposition, and it was really a matter of pride for Canadians who were present to see the enormous crowds that were struggling from morning until evening Mr. GRAHAM.

to see the exhibits of Canada. It was practically a farmers' exhibit, a representation of the life on our Canadian farms, an exhibition of our fur-bearing animals, a display of the fruits of Canada and of the products of our forests and of our mines. It was a most extraordinary fact that so many people from that wealthy country came to see what Canada had to exhibit. 1 am quite sure that with the literature which was distributed there, Canada derived great benefit from that exposition. I congratulate the minister on his decision to have our exhibit this year at Ghent, and I hope Mr. Hutchinson will be given a free hand, as he has had a free hand in the past, because he has a real genius for such organization. Might I suggest to the minister _ to be generous-I do not say in salaries, because I know he will pay good salaries to our officers-but to be generous in the printing of pamphlets, booklets, atlases and other literature in French. There is in Belgium, as my hon. friend knows, a large French population, and it is from that country that we expect, more than from France, to receive immigrants. The population of Belgium, in contradistinction to that of France, increases every year. The territory of Belgium is rather limited, and there is no country in the world where the population is so dense. They are well-to-do farmers, they have large families and they emigrate, while the French peasants do not emigrate. Especially will that be the case this year, for the new law which is being enforced in France for service in the army will make immigration more restricted than ever. From Belgium we may expect an excellent class of farmers and gardeners, and I am quite sure that if the statistics are consulted since the exhibition of Brussels, it will be found that there has been quite an increase in the immigration from Belgium into' Canada. If French and Flemish literature is being distributed, it will certainly result in a numerous class of desirable immigrants.

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BUEEELL:

The hon. gentleman can rest assured that no pains will be spared to make the exposition at Ghent worthy of Canada. I agree with what he s_ays concerning Belgium. We have a certain population from Belgium in the far West-in my own province especially. These people are most thrifty and their methods of intensive farming are a revelation to us. We could not get a better class of immigrants. We have made provision for a large distribution of suitable literature.

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John Ewen Sinclair

Mr. SINCLAIB:

This item is largely increased this year as compared with last. The minister gave us a general outline of what he intended to do with the ^ money, but it would be interesting to have items of the expenditure of this $200,000, so that

we may know how he intends to expend so large an amount.

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

I can only say, as I have already said, that a large proportion of this money is to he spent in connection with the exposition in Ghent. That exposition will close about October or November. But before the expiry of the fiscal year, we shall have to incur fairly heavy expense in getting ready for the Panama exposition to b.e held at San Francisco in 1915. As my hon. friend knows, if he has seen these expositions, there is enormous expense in sending the exhibits and otherwise. I think he will find that for this expenditure, large as it is, the country will get a very excellent return in final result.

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LIB

John Howard Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

From an answer given to a question which I asked in the House some time ago, I understood that the Government did not intend to participate in the Panama Exposition.

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

I think my hon. friend is confusing the Panama Exposition with the San Diego Exposition. It was not thought advisable to take part in the latter, as the San Francisco Exposition is probably the more important.

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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Can the minister tell us to what extent Canada intends to take part in the Panama Exposition?

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

I could not give my

hon. friend any definite information, but speaking personally, for it is somewhat early to take the matter up officially, my own feeling is that at the Panama Exposition Canada would be justified in making one of the strongest exhibitions that she has ever made. It is of immense importance that on that occasion we should be worthily represented, and that our great natural resources should be given due prominence.

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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Have representations been made to the Government by the manufacturers of Canada with regard to their being represented at one of these great expositions?

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

I have not any in mind.

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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I see no reason why the manufacturers should not endeavour to exhibit their products at these great fairs so that the people of the world would understand not only that we are a great agricultural country, but also that we have important manufacturing industries as well. I say this to impress on the manufacturers of Canada what I have often said to them privately: that they are missing a great opportunity in not coming to the front and endeavouring to get their products to these great expositions with a view to showing

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the people of the world that we are a manufacturing as well as an agricultural country.

Agricultural development of dairying and fruit industries; improvement in transportation, sale and trade in fruit and other agricultural products, $190,000. B

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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

The items composing this amount are: expenses in connection with headquarters, $15,000; expenses connected with the various dairying branches, $62,000; fruit division, $70,000; markets division, $22,790; cold storage, $18,900; a total of $190,000 and an increase of over last year's estimates of $50,000.

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May 30, 1913