May 26, 1913

LIB

George William Kyte

Liberal

Mr. KYTE:

I presume these appointments would come through the person having the patronage in the county of Richmond?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Absolutely no.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

George William Kyte

Liberal

Mr. KYTE:

The recommendation would rather suggest that.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

No.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

How long will it be before the road will be completed to the bay?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

They have taken the contract to complete it next year. From the progress they have made I question whether it will be finished then or not.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Is there a reasonable prospect of its being completed by 1915?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Yes, I do not think there is any doubt about that.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Is there any mention of

reaching Split Lake in advance of railway construction?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I think there is a way up. They go up Lake Winnipeg; there is a chain of lakes which they use in order to strike the railway very near there. I think Split Lake will probably be the next point to which they will move their headquarters in the fall.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Have the locations of the terminals at the Falls been decided upon?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Yes, on the south side.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Are they acquired from the Indian reserve?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

Yes, the Indians are being given valuation on their property. I hope it will not be too high. I do not think their land is worth much.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

The question has been

raised here in regard to the cost of this railroad, the charge upon the treasury. Some years ago the principle of pre-emptions was introduced into the western country, with the understanding that the fund accruing from the sale of pre-emptions would be considered as an extra source of revenue from which the Hudson Bay railway might be constructed. There was no ear-marking of money received. When the policy of sale of pre-emption was introduced, it was introduced with the understanding that a new source of revenue was being created which would relieve the general treasury from the cost of the Hudson Bay railway. Therefore the treasury of Canada is not Mr. COCHRANE.

finding* the money for building the railway. It is the land of the Northwest and the price that is being paid for that * land that is building the Hudson Bay railway; and enough money is being taken out of preemptions in the West to pay for that railway. I think it is just as well to have that statement made.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

The road will be built anyway.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

I want to relieve the assertion that the road constitutes a serious charge upon the finances of the country. As a matter of fact, it does not. Another point was that the grain that was raised in a certain year cannot go forward by the Hudson bay route during the same calendar year. That is measurably true, but it is also true with regard to grain going forward by the St. Lawrence route. Only a portion of the year's crop goes forward during the calendar year in which it is grown. I think it is safe to say that by far the larger part goes forward after having lain in storage not less than four, five, six or seven months. Therefore the disadvantage of the Hudson bay route in that particular is not serious. The disadvantage of navigation of Hudson straits is spoken of. Surely Hudson straits are more easily navigable during their proper season of navigation than the straits of Belle Isle. The straits of Belle Isle are three or four miles across while the Hudson straits are from forty miles to one hundred miles across. Yet an enormous traffic goes through the straits of Belle Isle when they are open. It is dangerous but it is short and much traffic is handled that way. In the Hudson straits there are disadvantages but they cannot be as great as in Belle Isle and the shortness in distance compensates for the disadvantages. The Hudson bay route was for two hundred years the only route by which could be reached what is now our prairie west and if it was adequate for the purposes of that trade during that time with the means of navigation that then existed, surely it will be of advantage under present conditions where the needs are so very great and the means of navigation have so greatly improved. In any case, it is a matter that may be talked about interminably without any conclusion being reached. The only way in which the question will ever bje solved will be by laying the rails from the wheat fields to the bay, and the sooner the rails are laid to the bay the better for the country and the greater the credit to this Government.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Francis Cochrane (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COCHRANE:

I think the greatest difficulty that navigators will experience will be drift ice and fog. I do not think the straits ever freeze over, from all the information I can get, but the raft ice and

fog during a portion of the year are very bad. You cannot do much even with wireless where you have ice. If it was only fog, if the straits were free of ice, you could have wireless stations and guide the steamers tip through the straits but where you have both it will be very difficult.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

We will go on with these estimates to-morrow?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
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CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

I think we will take up ithe militia estimates and the Justice Department estimates to-morrow. An understanding to that effect has been reached between the whips.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PERSONAL EXPLANATION-SIR WILFRID LAURIER.
Permalink

May 26, 1913