May 16, 1913

THE ROYAL ASSENT.


Mr. SPEAKER read a communication from the Governor General's Secretary, announcing that His Excellency the Administrator would proceed to the Senate Chamber this day, at 4.30 p.m., for the purpose of giving the Royal Assent to certain Bills.


FIRST READINGS.


Bill No. 207, respecting a patent of the Commercial Acetylene Company of New Jersey.-Mr. Maclean (South York). Bill No. 208, respecting a patent of Maurice Delvigne.-Mr. Barker. Mr. WEBSTER. That it is expedient to authorize the Minister of the Interior to issue a military bounty land certificate to Miss Lois B. Hutchinson, as the sole heir and personal representative of her deceased father, James Hutchinson, entitling her, or her substitute, to obtain, free of charge, an entry for a homestead of two adjoining quarter-sections of Dominion lands, and to receive letters patent therefor, provided that such entry is made and obtained on or before December 31, 1913.


FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.


Hon. T. W. CROTHERS (Acting Minister of the Interior), moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 209, to amend the Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act.


LIB
CON

Thomas Wilson Crothers (Minister of Labour)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CROTHERS:

When the former Act was passed, setting apart certain areas as forest reserves, the examination was not very full, close or accurate. It has been discovered since that there are in some cases, adjoining areas that should be added to these forest reserves and that in some cases, the present forest reserves included some agricultural land which should be taken from them. This Act is simply to amend the existing Act, enlarging the areas in some cases and in some cases taking some parts out of the reserves.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

That is a

very important distinction. I have no objection to the proposal that the forest reserves should, be increased, but to introduce farm lands into the forest reserves is to propose something that will very much interfere with the object of the Act.

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CON

Thomas Wilson Crothers (Minister of Labour)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CROTHERS:

I think there is a very small portion to be so treated-only in one or two cases.

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LIB
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

What reserves are affected by the provision withdrawing from the reserves?

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CON

Thomas Wilson Crothers (Minister of Labour)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CROTHERS:

There are only one

or two cases, I think. I will tell my hon. friend a little later on. I have the details of each case and the number o.f square miles that it is proposed to add. It is only in one or two cases that anything is proposed to be taken from a reserve.

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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


INCORRECT NEWSPAPER REPORT.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Might I call the attention of the House to a paragraph contained in the Citizen of this morning with regard to the proceedings in the House yesterday. There is an insinuation in it, which, I am afraid, was designed. This is what the Citizen says:

The final division took place at eleven-thirty and was witnessed by crowded galleries.

. . . One of the most notable features of the debate leading up to the passage of the Bill occurred with the Laurier motion for the six months-' hoist. The charge had been repeatedly made that the Government policy was dictated by the Nationalists, yet When! Sir Wilfrid Laurier sat down the man who got up to second his amendment was Guil-bault, of Joliette, a so-called Nationalist.

The gentleman who seconded my motion, and whom I asked to do so, was my desk mate, the Hon. Mr. Graham. That ought to be sufficient.

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NAVAL FORCES OF THE EMPIRE-IMPERIAL SQUADRON AT GIBRALTAR.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

I would call the attention of my right hon. friend who leads the House to a matter in regard to which I would like to get some information from him. In order to make my question intelligible I shall have to read a paragraph which I find in the United Empire for May, which just came to hand yesterday. Speaking of the recent speech of Mr. Churchill in regard to the organizing of a station at Gibraltar, the editor of the magazine says:

From that standpoint the most important part of the First Lord's statement was his declaration of the Admiralty's latest plan of Imperial co-operation. Its two parts are mutually dependent. On the assumption that the dominions would be willing to' provide the capital 6hips of a general service squadron, to be based at Gibraltar, the Admiralty suggests that they should direct their policies of local development to the provision of the ' necessary naval bases, dock-yards, crusiers, local flotillas, or other ancillary craft which would enable the Imperial squadron to operate for a prolonged period in any particular threatened theatre to which it might be sent.' To this squadron would be assigned the three prospective Canadian ships, together with the Malaya and New Zealand.

Then, on the next page, the editor goes on to say:

The reception of the Admiralty's proposal in the dominions was mixed. As regards Canada, where one would suppose that the Government would support it and the Opposition deprecate it, the announcement was followed by a sudden silence of the cables, which hitherto had been busy with the progress of the naval controversy. Only from' New Zealand was there any abundance of! comment which was thought likely to interest the British public. The getneral tenor was favourable to the scheme, though the selection of Gibraltar was not universally approved.

The question which I want to put to my right hon. friend is whether or not any official communication has been received from the Admiralty in regard to this intended project.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

In regard to what my right hon. friend first observed, I have nothing to do with and do not know anything about any communication to the press with respect to the seconding of his amendment. I did observe that the hon. member for Joliette (Mr. Guilbault) had taken the floor before six o'clock, and it was yielded to my right hon. friend as a matter of courtesy. As far as the noise or the silence of the cables is concerned, I know nothing about it; I have nothing to do with their noise and I have nothing to do with their silence. In respect to the matter on which the right

hon. gentleman has asked a question, there has been no official communication from the Admiralty except in so far as the matter has been brought to the attention of the dominions throughout the speech of the First Lord of the Admiralty, from which I made a quotation last evening.

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May 16, 1913