May 14, 1913

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN:

Suppose that instead of doing it that way, the department had employed sandwich men, used very often in England, would these men be ' public works ' under the meaning of the Act ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

The men would not,

but the posters which constitute the ' sandwich ' would be a ' work ' performed under the direction and authority of the Government. And if the ' work ' exceeds the sum of $5,000, under this statute the Government is bound to call for tenders, Now, my right hon. friend has forgotten the immediate past. I remember when he was sitting on this side witn his band of gallant 'followers, and I remember especially the hon. member for Peel (Mr. Blain) how he pounded his desk and thundered against the Liberal Government because of very small things of this kind

that were allowed to be done. I think I can find in the Halifax platform a resolution against any such work as this on the part of the minister. I would like the hon. gentleman to read over again that section. I do not impugn the good faith of anyone, but I say that there has been a violation of the law according to my interpretation of it. The second part, as 1 have shown, is general and is applicable to any department and the works connected with that department.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

Yes, provided it is

' work.'

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Will the hon. gentleman say that buying stamps is not a ' work ' of the department ? And does not he call for tenders for that ' work '? Does not he call for tenders for the equipment of post offices and for the mail bags ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER :

We never call for

tenders for advertisements.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Charles Avila Wilson

Liberal

Mr. WILSON (Laval):

I desire to ask

a question with regard to the sandwich men. Take for example: suppose the Government were sending out men with the Nationalist bill carried in front and a Conservative bill at the back, what kind of ' work ' would that be ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Edmund Boyd Osler

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir EDMUND OSLER:

To what extent

are the public taking advantage of this annuities system ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

I am glad the hon.

member has put the question. I have here the complete information, and I am sure it will interesting to the House and to the public.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I think there was a

series of questions to be asked, and the minister might give the committee information in the form of answers to those questions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

I was going to do

that. Applications for annuities have been received from the following classes:

School teachers, married women, minors, clerks, spinsters, civil servants, farmers, trained 'nurses, students, stenographers, merchants, physicians, book-keepers, photographers, accountants, carpenters, shipping clerks, bank clerks, barristers, civil engineers, dress-makers, postmasters, insurance agents, geologists, shoe-makers, domestics, mariners, travellers, dentists, gardeners, music teachers, barbers, tailors, reporters; freight agents, draughtsmen, drug Clerks, excise officers, lithographers, property agents, harness makers, ferrymen, trackmen, chemical1 engineers, librarians, printers, telegraph operators, lumbermen, peddlers, deaconesses, freight checkers, cable operators, port stewards, business managers, station agents, locomotive engineers, electricians, factory

bands, picture framers, florists, miners, North West mounted police, labourers and shantymen.

It will be a good advertisement for the annuities that it should be known that a minister of the Crown has taken annuities. Without giving names, I think members will understand what I mean, and it will be a very good example for the public. I have here information to give in answer to the questions that were to be asked. The first is a question by the leader of the Opposition:

How many persons have purchased annuities to date?-A. 3,163.

And the hon. member for Rouville asks:

What proportion of new annuities have been taken through the agency of the various postmasters?

A. About forty-five per cent of those purchasing during the past year have remitted through the post offices.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

We expect it to be

better when the postmasters understand it better. Other questions from the hon. member for Rouville, with their answers, are as follows:

What are the expectations of those in charge of the work as to the future expansion of the system?

A. As soon as the people appreciate the enormous benefits tto be obtained from an investment in an annuity, it is believed they will take advantage of the system in large numbers.

What means are taken to induce the public to go to the post office for that purpose?

A. In the more important places the billboard posters already referred to instruct the public to inquire at the post office for information. A miniature of this poster, such as I hold in my hand, will be sent to the post offices. The distribution had been commenced but has been delayed in consequence of its having been found that the covering or carton in which the poster was enclosed was not sufficiently strong to stand the pressure of the heavy mail matter going out from the Ottawa post office. The matter is receiving attention, and the distribution will be made at the earliest possible moment. It is believed that this will supply in the smaller places, where nearly every one goes to the post office, the purpose to be supplied in cities and towns by the larger poster, and that it will readily attract attention.

What number of posters have been placed in Canada?

A. 1,068. . .

Is the distribution confined to cities? or is it extended to villages and country districts?

A. The distribution covers 132 cities, towns and villages which have an aggregate population of 2,671,840.

The hon. member for Russell (Mr. Murphy) asks the following questions, to which replies are given:

Q. Has there been an increase in the amount of the premium or payments to be made for annuities?-A. No, the rates remain the same as originally established.

Q. Has there been an increase in the instalments corresponding with the total amount of annuity itself?-A. No, the cost is relatively the same whether the purchase is of the minimum annuity or of the maximum, and purchasers are not tied down to any definite plan of payment, but the greatest freedom is afforded them. They will only receive the amount of annuity that they actually pay for.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Has the Postmaster

General arranged that these posters shall be printed in the French language?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER:

My hon. friend will see posters printed in both languages along the streets right here in Ottawa.

Bill reported.

At one o'clock, House took recess.

House resumed at three o'clock. ANIMAL CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

On motion of Hon. Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture), Bill No. 198. to amend the Animal Contagious Diseases Act was read the second time, and the House went into Committee thereon. (Mr. Deputy Speaker in the Chair.)

On section 1-compensation for animals destroyed:

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Would the minister give a statement of the difference between this clause and the Act as it stands?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

The difference, as I explained to the House the other day, is that we have raised the maximum value oh grade horses from $150 to $200 and raised the maximum valuation on pure breds to $500, two-thirds of which will be paid as compensation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

David Warnock

Liberal

Mr. WARNOCK:

I see that it is provided that compensation shall be paid on valuations of $60 per head of cattle and $15 for sheep. Is that in the existing Act?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

Except for the alterations in the valuation of horses there is no change in existing compensation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

What are the diseases for which cattle and sheep may be slaughtered?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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CON

Martin Burrell (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURRELL:

Practically we are not slaughtering any now. The main diseases we are concerned about in sheep is scab and in cattle, anthrax. We are fighting anthrax by immunizing, the injection of a vaccine, and we supply the vaccine.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES.
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May 14, 1913