February 28, 1912

LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

at the close of navigation, conditions settle. The grain goes into storage, it is not forwarded as rapidly, some relief is given by transportation eastward, and, generally speaking, the condition of blockade ceases at or soon after the close of navigation. But, in the case of this season, instead of the expectation of relief being realised, the condition of blockade was made permanent and was accentuated. While there was a reasonable reflex on the farmer in his price because of the blockade condition existing before December 10, after December 10 a panic condition ensued and panic prices became the rule to the farmer. Instead of the country operator paying the farmer the winter price subject to the reduction that I have made for storage, insurance and other charges, being faced with the possibility that he could not get the grain forwarded at all, or did not know when he could get it forwarded panic prices resulted to the farmer, panic conditions prevailed and have prevailed ever since.

I have already said that unless the damaged grain gets to the hospital elevator by the first of April it is, in all probability, destroyed. This fact, of course, accentuates the panic condition that prevails this season. Of course, all figures must be estimates, actual accuracy cannot be demonstrated, but the figures which I propose to give the committee are unquestionably within the mark. On the 50,000,000 bushels of grain marketed between November 10 and January 10-that is marketed between the first blockade condition and January 10 when the blockade condition was demonstrated to be impossible of relief-estimating the loss to the farmers at six cents a bushel, the loss to the farmers would be $3,000,000. But, on the 50,000,000 bushels remaining to be marketed after J anuary 10, and, which, according to the statement of Mr. Thompson of the Ogilvie Milling Company, must be marketed under panic conditions, I think it is a very moderate estimate to say that the loss would be ten cents a bushel to the farmers, or a loss of $5,000,000 from January 10 to the end of the season and of $3,000,000 from the beginning of the blockade on November 10 to January 10.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

Frederick Laurence Schaffner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SCHAFFNER.

Do I understand the hon. gentleman to say that 50,000,000 bushels was the amount of wheat in the farmers hands on January 10?

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Frederick Laurence Schaffner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SCHAFFNER.

I presume that the hon. gentleman must know that it has never been the custom of the western farmers to ship all their grain out, but that- a great deal of the grain is kept over until the following summer and that it would

not have been shipped if there had been ever so many cars.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I have already said to the committee that the fact of so much of the grain being damp, makes it necessary that the grain shall be got forward to the drying or hospital elevators, or it will go out of condition. It will be seriously damaged or altogether destroyed. The conditions this season differ from ordinary conditions.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

What percentage of this

50,000,000 bushels was damaged?

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I have the statement of Mr. Thompson, of the Ogilvie Milling Company, and also of a Mr. Black, I think- at any rate of two gentlemen connected with the Ogilvie Milling Company-both estimating that 30,000,000 bushels will be remaining in the farmers' hands or damaged by reason of being damp, a large part of it unthreshed at that time, and a considerable part of it is unthreshed yet. My hon. friends, _ who are acquainted with farming conditions, know that if grain in the stook when the snow comes on, is threshed, that grain must get to where it will be dried before the hot weather comes on, because, otherwise it would be very much damaged.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

Frederick Laurence Schaffner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SCHAFFNER.

It is not threshed yet, is it?

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

A great deal of it is not threshed. When a blockade exists, and it becomes impossible for either the farmer or the dealer to get the grain forwarded, then certainly the grain is safer in the stook than it is in the farmers' granary or in the country elevator.

There is no doubt that there is a great deal of grain to-day remaining unthreshed in the stooks, that if there was no blockade would have been threshed and gone forward, and the farmer would have got the money for it.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

How does the hon. gentleman make that out?

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

My hon. friend (Mr. Staples) lives in a farming constituency, and he knows perfectly well that what I am saying is correct, and there is m use arguing it between us.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

I am only asking the hon. gentleman for information. I am proud to say I am a farmer and have a fair knowledge of what takes place amongst the farming community, and I can state that every available threshing machine has been working overtime trying to get the grain threshed.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Well, I am not disputing that at all. I have said that there is a great deal of the grain still unthreshed, 128

and I have said that in my judgment it is more than likely that a great deal of that grain would have been threshed if there had been no blockade.. But, there being a blockade, there was no object in threshing it when it would have suffered greater damage after being threshed than it was suffering by remaining in the stooks, when it was not possible to get it forwarded properly.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

Does the hon. gentleman mean that the threshing machines in the west have been idle instead of operating?

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I mean in some cases they have undoubtedly.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

I can assure you they have not.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

My hon. friend (Mr. Staples) is no doubt familiar with the constituency he represents, but the conditions in that constituency, as the House knows, are not the same as they are in other parts of the west.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

I have a fair knowledge of the whole west.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Then my hon. friend will have to allow us who represent other parts of the west to speak for our own constituencies just as we will be glad to have the hon. gentleman speak for the part of the west he represents.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink
CON

William D. Staples

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STAPLES.

Then I understand the hon. gentleman to say that in the part of the west he represents the threshing machines have been idle.

Topic:   SUPPLY-MOOSEJAW ARMOURY.
Subtopic:   GRAIN CONGESTION IN THE WEST.
Permalink

February 28, 1912