February 5, 1912

THE DUTY ON LUMBER.

LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF.

Mr. Speaker, before the orders of the day are called, I would like to ask the Alinister of Customs Whether it is true, as reported in the Winnipeg ' Free Press,' that in ia shipment of 20 cars of lumber that came in lately, the appraisers, under instructions, went through the cars and examined the lumber piece by piece, and found in one car nine pieces that, showed marks of the planer on the edge, and in another car only four pieces that showed marks of the planer. What I want to ask is whether, if that was the case, the consignee was obliged to pay 25 per cent duty on all of the lumber, or was the portion that did not show marks of the planer allowed to come in free?

Topic:   THE DUTY ON LUMBER.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. SPEAKER.

That is scarcely the kind of a question that can be put, with the expectation that the answer can be given by the minister on the spur of the moment. It would require information being obtained from another source.

Topic:   THE DUTY ON LUMBER.
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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Air. TURRIFF.

I will give notice, then, that on the first convenient occasion I will bring the matter up.

Topic:   THE DUTY ON LUMBER.
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THE PANAMA CANAL.

LIB

John Howard Sinclair

Liberal

Air. SINCLAIR.

I would ask permission to draw the attention of the Prime Alinister to a report in the newspapers of the United States regarding the fixing of tolls on the Panama canal. Though it would seem a little early to deal with tins ques-

[DOT]2447

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mir. SPEAKER.

The lion., member is scarcely in order in discussing that question at this stage.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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LIB

John Howard Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR.

I regard it as a question of special importance, Mr. Speaker, so much so that I hope I shall be permitted at the present time to ask the Prime Minister a question in regard to it.'

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

Under the rules of the House the hon. gentleman should not introduce anything of a controversial nature-

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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LIB
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

Except it be to ask a question, an hon. member desires to bring up something of a special and urgent nature, he might do so by getting the permission to move the adjournment of the House.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. L. BORDEN (Prime Minister).

The hon. gentleman might be permitted to read the despatch for the purpose of asking a question, though I am afraid I cannot give him -any answer in regard to it_ to-day. But I would like to know what it is, if the House has no objection.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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LIB

John Howard Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR.

The despatch which I find in the American papers is as follows:

Washington, D.C., Feb. 3, 1912.-Senators who discussed the symposium giving the views of shipping men and exporters on cana-l tolls, said the question of tolls should be soon settled .

Senator Brandeger, chairman of the Senate Committee on Interoceanic Canals, said that he was emphatically in favour of rebating the tolls paid by American ships. ' American shipping interests,' he said, 'should be encouraged to use the canal to develop our foreign trade.'

Senator Penrose said: ' The canal is not alone a war measure, but is an industrial project which is expected to advance the commercial -interests of the United States. As liberal concessions -as are possible under the treaty should be made to our own ships, and wide discretion should be left with the President in fixing the tonnage rates.

The proposal is made in some of the papers of the United States that the ships of that country be admitted at a less rate than the ships of other nations. It has been proposed that $1 a ton should be charged to ships belonging to foreign countries, and 50 cents a tom to ships belonging to the United States. I would regard that as a violation of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty, which I think will be found to provide that no discrimination should be given to vessels of Mr. SINCLAIR.

the United States passing through the canal. The proposal in the despatch which I have read is to give a rebate to American ships in order to encourage American commerce. I submit that that is also a violation of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty. The attention of the United States authorities might be drawn to the manner in which Canada has treated the United States in regard to the St. Lawrence route, on which we have spent something like $100,000,000 to provide a channel for -ships from the ocean to the Great Lakes, through which we allow the ships of the United States to pass free.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

The hon. member is certainly going beyond the point of asking a question.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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LIB

John Howard Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR.

My suggestion to the Prime Minister is that he look into the mat ter, and endeavour to get for Canadian vessels passing through the Panama canal as good terms as possible.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN.

The hon. gentleman was good enough to give me an intimation that he proposed to ask me that question; but I only received it on entering the House to-day, when the despatch to which he alludes had not been brought to my attention. As far as I understand it, the despatch is based on nothing more than newspaper discussion on some proposal which has been made in Congress. There has been no definite action taken by the government of the United States up to the present time. Howeve-r, I shall be glad to look at the despatch, and later perhaps it may be convenient to allude to the subject again. The government will give it consideration at the earliest possible moment.

Topic:   THE PANAMA CANAL.
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PRIVATE BILLS.

STERLING LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA.


House in committee on Bill (No. 72) to incorporate the Sterling Life Assurance Company of Canada.-Mr. Blain.


CON

Richard Blain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLAIN.

I have a little amendment to propose to this clause. I move that the name of William F. Clews he added to the directorate.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   STERLING LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA.
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February 5, 1912