January 31, 1912

LIB
CON

Richard Blain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLAIN.

My point, Mr. Speaker, is that the farmers do not complain a great deal about going to the post office when they receive mail, but they do complain of the number of times they travel themselves, or send somebody, and come home without anything. That is exactly what I wish to avoid.

I think it is only fair that when the enterprise of the people in a rural section of this country has reached the point where they will invest their own money to have a telephone system, that the government should join them and see that the postal system of the country is connected up with the telephone system. I think that is a reasonable request, and one which should appeal to the judgment of hon. gentlemen on both sides of the House.

In the large centres of population they have a daily delivery. In smaller centres they are close to the post office, and somebody is passing it almost every day, therefore, the task of going for the mail is not a very serious one, and is not at all comparable with what they have to meet in the rural districts.

I am not asking in this resolution that the government expend its money in the construction of telephone systems. That has already been taken up in some places by private enterprise. In some of the provinces it has been dealt with by the provincial governments. I do not ask that this government should appropriate a large amount of money for this purpose, but I do ask that we simply follow the people- not lead the people in this instance-and where they have telephonic communication, the government should join with them and see that the post offices are connected with the telephone system, so that there may be a good and efficient service.

At the present time most of the farmers in these rural sections can call up their storekeepers, or their neighbours. If that be true, I say it is in the interest of the farmer, and calculated to make the home life on the farm more acceptable, that the government should see to it that the post offices in these sections are connected, so that the entire system would be perfect and up to date.

I do not think that the resolution is one which requires any extended remarks from me. This is a matter [DOT] which has had consideration in this House in former years. At the last session I had the honour of directing the attention of the ex-Postmaster General (Mr. Lemieux) to the matter, and he was good enough to say he thought it was worthy of very serious consideration. Now, I am quite sure he is still of that opinion.

I am. not going to press the question on the government. I fealize it has been in office but a short time, and has had

many things to face and deal with. I am not going to be over anxious, but in these days of people demanding a better postal service, I think the time is -opportune to take up this subject.

There are a good many sections of the country to which this resolution would not apply, but, in other sections, even in the province of Ontario, there are still many places where they only have a mail three times a week, and in some cases only twice a week. In fact, in some places not at all, as my hon. friend from Fronte-nac (Mr. Edwards) says.

I have many facts and figures which I could cite, but I do not think I should take up the time of the House with them. However, if my hon. friends on both sides of this House will support this resolution, simple as it is, I think they will receive the approval of the rural districts of our country.

In conclusion, I simply wish to move the adoption of the resolution, and direct the attention of the goverment, and more particularly of my hon. friend the Postmaster General (Mr. Pelletier) to an earnest and thoughtful consideration of the question. .

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

My attention has been drawn to this resolution, and after looking up the authorities I must say my verdict is that the resolution is out of order inasmuch as it implies the purchase and putting in of telephones, which must be paid for out of the revenues of the country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER.

If the House is willing, we might allow the discussion to go on by consent. This is a matter of public interest and one of considerable importance. At all events, the debate on it will probably be adjourned.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

General in the session in which such vote, resolution, address or Bill is proposed.

The constitutional provision which regulates the procedure of the Canadian House of Commons in this respect applies not only to motions directly proposing a grant of public money but also to those which involve such a grant.

It is clear to me that if this motion carried it would involve such a grant.

A member who has not received the permission of the Crown has not been allowed to move the House into committee on a resolution providing for the purchase hnd exportation by the government of certain depreciated silver coinage.

Then with regard to the other question, I find this in ' May's Parliamentary Practice,' speaking of the authority of the Crown:

By a standing order, 20th March, 1806, ' This House will receive no petition for any sum relating to public service, or proceed upon any motion for a grant or charge upon the public revenues, whether payable out of the consolidated fund, or out of monies to be provided by parliament, but what is recommended from the Crown.' And this rule is extended, by the uniform practice of the House, to any motion which, though not directly proposing a grant or charge upon the public revenue, involves the expenditure of public money.

The purchase of these telephones would clearly involve an expenditure of public money. For these reasons I should be obliged to rule that the motion is out of order.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER.

The only thing I want to make clear is that I did not raise any objection.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Richard Blain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLAIN.

I suppose there will be no objection in allowing the discussion to go on. I did not propose to press the resolution, it was my intention to withdraw it.

I .appreciate what the Speaker hais sard, and I do not wish to violate the rules. If necessary, I would ask that the resolution he allowed to stand, until such time as I could move an adjournment in committee, so as to bring it within the rules of the House.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER.

As the motion has now been ruled out of order, there is nothing before the House.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TELEPHONES IN RURAL POST OFFICES.
Permalink

NATIONAL MEANS OF COMMUNICATION.

CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG (East Lambton) moved:

That, in the opinion of this House, a commission should be appointed to investigate the systems of national telegraphs and telephones, wireless telegraphs and cables, also postal conditions, laws and regulations, parcel post, means of collecting and distributing Mr. SPEAKER.

mails, with a view to submitting such data and information to the Post Office Department as would help to improve existing conditions in all the above, and to further inquire into postal facilities in rural districts in other countries in order that a better [DOT]ystem of rural free mail delivery may be inaugurated.

He said: My object in asking for the appointment of this commission is to obtain definite data and statistics with reference to these great public utilities. In the Halifax platform, which was issued in August, 1907, the present Prime Minister of Canada used the following words:

It has been demonstrated in Great Britain that telegraphs and telephones can be successfully operated in connection with the Post Office Department. I see no reason why a similar system should not he inaugurated and carried out successfully in Canada. Few people realize that at the present time Canada owns and operates 6,586 miles of state tele-rraph lines. These lines have not been remunerative for the reason that they have been established in thinly settled portions of the country where private enterprise could find no adequate return. If we are prepared to invest national capital in thinly peopled and unremunerative localities, why should we hesitate in those portions of the country where operations can he carried on at a profit? I do not forget the necessity that our great railways must be equipped with telegraph and telephone lines, nor do I forget the principle of justice to invested capital which I have already invoked. Having regard to these considerations onr policy should include the establishment, after due investigation, of a system of national telegraphs and telephones under conditions which shall be just to capital already invested.

I feel satisfied, Mr. Speaker, that out of the Halifax platform have already come many great reforms in the Dominion of Canada, but none greater than the proposed legislation. I think we should go about acquiring these great public utilities under the common-sense business methods^ and there is no question in my mind that if they were nationalized they would become a source, not only of revenue, but of great advantage to the people of Canada. There are five great means of transmitting intelligence in this country: The telegraph, the telephone, wireless telegraphy, cables, and the post office. All these means of transmitting intelligence are of vital importance to every man, woman and child in the country. It is, therefore, our duty to investigate and gather statistics with regard to these important facilities, with a view to nationalize them, and make them part of the Post Office Department of Canada. I propose to give some reasons for asking for this legislation. For the past five years I have given considerable time and attention to gathering statistics | with regard to these great national under-| takings. Knowing as I do the success that

has attended the nationalization of these utilities in foreign lands, I feel confident that the time is not far distant when the people of Canada will demand, at least, that an investigation be made with a view to placing these utilities under the Dominion government. In the platform of the right hon. the Prime Minister, which I have quoted, he refers to these utilities. He calls attention to the fact that we had in Canada at that time over 6,000 miles of telegraph lines that were not remunerative. To-day we have 8,000 miles of telegraph lines, owned, controlled, and operated by the Dominion government; and these telegraph lines, instead of being a source of revenue to the government, cost this country last year the sum of $270,000. We have over 600 offices for the management of these telegraphic enterprises. The largest telegraph company we have in the Dominion of Canada, namely, the Canadian Pacific railway, control, own and operate over 12,000 miles of pole lines, and over 76,000 miles of wire; and their income, after paying all expenses, amounted last year to the handsome sum of $1,270,000.

That amount, according to the books which the Canadian Pacific Railway placed at the disposal of the Tailway commission [DOT]within the last few weeks, shows that they only invested in that enterprise, $6,600,000. You can readily see that within six years, by that method of calculation, the amount of capital invested would be returned to them in dividends. You will find that the Canadian Pacific Railway have been able to reaudit the statement of the audit office as placed before the railway commission. They have tried to show that there are certain charges which should have been included in the statement of the investment which came from their own audit office, but after investigating that you cannot come to any other conclusion than I have that, in so far as these statements are concerned, they are not worthy of consideration and that the actual income from the investment of $6,600,000 'amounted last year to $1,270,000.

Let us take the next greatest telegraph company we have in the Dominion of Canada, the Great Northwestern, with its 17,000 miles of pole lines and its 50,000 miles of wire. Thev have been able to cover up their earnings to a very great_ extent because a large portion of their stock is held in the United States and the enterprise is controlled and operated from that point. If you take into consideration all the other telegraph lines in the Dominion of Canada-and when I say that, l am speaking in reference to the telegraph lines of the railways-you will come to the conclusion that the Canadian Pacific Railway own, operate and control nearly half the miles of pole line and more than half the miles of wire in Canada and

if that company are able to place before the Railway Commission figures which go to show that they have only invested $6,600,000 in the enterprise, it is not too much to expect that if we were to attempt to purchase all the telegraph lines and wires in Canada the cost should not exceed $13,000,000 or $14,000,000. But then, you would have control of the telegraph wires that operate our railways; 'SO that you have to take from that the wires necessary to operate the railway systems. When you came to figure it ud you would find that you could not possibly invest more than, say $10,000,000, in order to enable you to own and operate the commercial telegraph lines. Ten million dollars is not such an enormous amount when you take into consideration the rates which have been charged against people in the east and in the west and at the same time the manner in which this public utility has been conducted. In addition to that the Canadian Pacific. railway are paid through our Own Cable board $65,000 per annum in connection with the cable service, which would help to pay the interest on our own capital.

Now, I desire to refer to the telephone companies and to call your attention to the fact that we have 460 independent telephone companies in Ontario while, in the Dominion, it is estimated that we have in the neighbourhood of a thousand telephone companies. In the United States they have 15,000 independent telephone companies operating over 4,000,000 phones and costing, as they claim, over $400,000,000. The independent telephone companies in our country are practically on their knees to the great Bell Telephone Company, especially in the eastern provinces and the proposal that I have to make to parliament is that we should own the trunk lines of telephone, that these trunk lines should go to the independent companies and let the municipalities or the independent companies own, control and operate these lines and make them local concerns. After investigating to some extent the operation of telephone lines in different foreign countries I find that the most feasible plan, as far as Canada is concerned, is that we should at once either take over the trunk lines and operate them or else build trunk lines in Canada in connection with the telegraph lines because we must recognize that the telegraph and telephone should go hand-in-hand. Wires that are used for one service can readily be used for the other. The provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta own and operate their own telenhone systems. We should, at the earliest possible date connect up the eastern trunk lines with that great northwestern country and with these great western provinces so that we will be able to assist in such a way as would be possible, did we own, as we should, the telegraph and tele-

phone lines running through that western country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NATIONAL MEANS OF COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
LIB

George Ewan McCraney

Liberal

Mr. McCRANEY.

Does the hon. gentleman propose that this parliament should take over the lines which are now under the control of these three western provinces?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NATIONAL MEANS OF COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ARMSTRONG (Lambton).

I have no such proposition in my mind. I do- not think it would be advisable for this government to go into the different municipalities in Canada arid attempt to own. control and operate these lines. In many foreign countries they 'have systems whereby they do control, own and operate all the telephone and telegraph lines in those countries, such as Germany, hut in other places, where they own and operate trunk lines and where they have connected them up with the municipalities they find that it is an altogether better system and that the conditions which arise in the different municipalities are such that they have an altogether better service.

We have in Canada some twenty-five wireless telegraph stations. Some years ago the late government entered into a contract with the Marconi Company for the construction by that company of a number of wireless stations in Canada. The Marconi Company agreed to build these wireless stations for $5,000 each and to include in each .station comfortable homes for the operators in charge. From a return which I asked last year we find that these stations have cost Canada from $10,000 to $20,000 each and that in addition to this we are paying tens of thousands of dollars to the Marconi Company to operate a large proportion of those wireless telegraph stations. But we are in this position with regard to these great utilities. As far as the telegraph system is concerned we own and control the lean end of it, the productive end is turned over to the great monopolies. It is the same with the telephone system. You find rural districts doing their utmost to gather together a sufficient number of people to organize independent companies in rural districts in order that they may have some of the comforts which accrue frorn a telephone system. But the productive end of the telephone system is owned, operated and controlled by the Bell Telephone Company in Ontario and Quebec and in some of the eastern provinces by other telephone companies.

The wireless telegraph stations are in much the same position. I want the House to recognize that we have some twenty-five wireless telegraph stations in Canada costing from $10,000 to $20,000 each. Fifteen of these stations are controlled by the Marconi Telegraph people. They are the profitable end' of the wireless- telegraph stations. The unprofitable end of that whole system is operated by this govern-Mr. ARMSTRONG (E. Lambton)

ment at a very great loss. I am a firm believer in wireless telegraphy being taken over as a public utility and placed under the control and operation of this government in order that not only our shores may receive the splendid advantages that accrue from having these stations established there but that, in the not far distant future, we may have stations throughout the Dom-minion of Canada and that the long distances that separate our east from our great west may be overcome by a system of wireless telegraphy.

I shall also endeavour to place before the House a number of statistics with reference to parcel post systems in European countries. The position of the parcel post system is similar to that of the other utilities to which I have referred. Our Post Office Department does the unprofitable end of the carrying of parcels in this country, the profitable end is done by the express companies, and they are able to pay dividends of 100 per cent and 200 per cent on their capital. The unprofitable end is done by the Post Office Department, but as soon as it gets up to a few ounces in weight the postal rate begins to be prohibitive and the express companies step in and take the remunerative end of the parcel post. I have no desire to urge upon the House the need of -establishing -a parcel post for Canada; I shall only urge the need of establishing a parcel post system in the rural districts, what you might term a rural parcel post. This parcel post system will be confined to rural mail or stage routes and only there so that the great departmental houses will not have the advantages that many of the people of our country are inclined to think they might have if we had a general parcel post system for the Dominion.

I trust that my good friend the Postmaster General (Mr. Pell-etier) will not think I am encroaching on his -duties as Postmaster General, in placing this resolution before the House. I hope that this commission, if it is appointed, will have the privilege of gathering in other lands material that will be of untold benefit to the Post Office Department -of Canada, and that they will Teport to the Po-stmaster General on the important matters of rural free mail delivery and parcel post in other countries. Our present system of rural free mail delivery is not only extravagant, but it is breeding -contention and strife in the different districts in which it is in operation, and I would throw out as -a suggestion to the Postmaster General that the time has come when the Post Office Department will have to make a separate branch for this service and place over it a man who is not only competent, but i-s willing and ready to further th-e interests of rural free mail delivery in 'Canada. I believe that

many of the inspectors in the department to-day are not anxious to further the interests of rural mail delivery, they do not like to assume the added responsibilities that it entails. I sincerely hope the day is not far distant when the Postmaster General will undertake these reforms, and that he will see' that these inspectors will do their duty in this regard and will carry out the wishes of the people in reference to this great national undertaking.

I would: like to place before the House some figures with regard to the telegraph systems of Canada.

Canada owns in government-owned telegraphs and -cables, 8,406 miles, of which 8,150 miles are telegraph lines, or l-and lines. She has 603 offices, -and the number of mess-ages sent in 1910-11 amounted to 249,915. The expenditure in 1910-11 amounted to $432,970.04, while the revenue amounted to only $169,585.15, leaving a deficit of $263,384.89.

The Canadian government get the lean end -of the telegraph business. In the same w-ay they get the lean end of the cable, telephone and postal business, while the monopolies h-ave control of -the profitable end of -these systems.

Note the fact that the Dominion -has 603 offices with only 8,000 mates of line, white the Great Northwestern Telegr-aph ComPany, the only -one that competes with the Canadian Pacific railway in extent of mileage, own, as they -did ini 1910-11, 11,234 miles of pole lines, and 50,092 miles of wire line, and sent 2,907,495 messages, having only 1,183 offices, or le-s-s than double the number of offices- run -by the Canadian government, -and -send three times as many messages.

The Canadian Pacific railway in that

year ^operated 12,257 miles of pole lines, with 76,175 mites of wire, sending messages to the extent- of 3,431,493, and the total number of th-eir olfic-es is 1,372, or a little over double the offices now operated by the government.

The Western Union, the third largest of the chartered -companies, in 1910 had 2 639 miles of telegraph pole line-s, with 11,024 miles of wire, sending 551,764 messages with 217 offices.

The North American Telegraph Company, Limited, in 1910 operated 605 -miles of line and 783 miles of wire, and sent 38,015 messages with 83 offices.

The Grand Trunk Pacific r-ailway in 1910 operated 1,699 mile-s of pole lines, 5,081 miles of wire, and 71,154 messages, with 73 offices.

The Ailgom-a Central railway in 1910 h-adi 130 miles of lane, 174 miles of line wire, sent 3,639 messages, -and had o-nl-y four1 offices.

The Temiscaimingue and Northern Ontario r-ailway in 1910 had 265 miles of pole line and 1,865 unites of wire, and sent 131,-lu6^ messages with twenty-two offices.

The total number of miles of pol-e line owned by -all the companies in Canada is 28,729.

The total number of m-i-le-s of line and wire operated by telegraph, telephone and cable companies in 1910 was 145,997.

The total number of messages taken and delivered over -all these lines, not including press messages, was 7,134,665.

T-he -total number of offl-ces was 2,934.

You will readily see that the 'Canadian Pacific Railway Company own- and operate nearly half the total number of -miles of pole line in the Dominion, and -over half the miles of -wire, -and send nearly hal-f the me-s-sages; so that with -an estimate placed before you by that company of 1-es-s than seven million of -dollars -as- the value of their pole -lines, lines of wire, etc., the estimate I have made of $15,000,000 would be m-ore t-han sufficient to purchase all the telegraph lines in -existence in Canada to-Qiay. The annual eliarge (for this amount of money -at three per cent would be $400,000. In ord-er -to make the proposition pay interest at three per cent on $15,000,000 you would need a surplus of $400,000 per annum. The -surplu-s of the Canadian Pacific Railway telegraphs operating half the proposed mileage has been over one anil-lion per year on the average for th-e past -six years. I-f, on the other hand, we were to buy the Canadian Pacific Railway system -and charged them so much for operating -their trains over that system, the government getting the rest, there would be -a still greater revenue. At the present rates of messages the government could count on a profit of -on-e million dollars per year. So on an investment of $7 000000 the government -could count on having their -m-on-ey returned in at least six years or the earnings could be applied to -a reduction of rates.

I -have some figures which have been placed before the Railway Commission within the last fe-w weeks by tile Canadian l-acihc Railway Company, and I will ask tne House to be -allowed to place them on Hansard.5

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NATIONAL MEANS OF COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Postmaster General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PELLETIER.

I do not think th-e House would object to miy hon. friend placing these figures on ' Hansard,' as they are most interesting.

ARMSTRONG. I appreciate what the Postmaster General has said. These are copies of statements taken from the audit books of the Canadian Pacific Railway telegraph line, showing the commercial end of their -business.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NATIONAL MEANS OF COMMUNICATION.
Permalink

REVISED EDITION ' COMMONS CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY.


Estimate of Value of Plant. Pole line and equipment $3,897,238 39Wires 2,190,965 37Cables 275,044 11Call box system, Toronto to Montreal, &c„ 4,865 boxes at $7 each. 34,055 00104 linemen's equipment at $138.25. 14,378 00 37 gang's equipment (G. and B.) at $646.49 23,920 13Instruments 119,149 40Batteries and dynamos 50,559 00Furniture 41,109 00Material in stock 50,000 00



Summary of Miles of Lines and Canadian Pacific Railway, estimate of Value. Miles. Cost. Atlantic division 1,047 $332,141 42Eastern division 1,642 466,806 14Ontario division 1,873 566,722 86Lake Superior division.. .. 1,117 519,700 67Manitoba division 2,333 636,792 19Saskatchewan division.. .. 1,349 333,308 91Alberta division 1,448 476,750 33British Columbia division. 1,299 585,011 87 Miles of pole line.. .. 12,108 $3,897,238 39 C.P.R. Tel. miles of wire.. 75,872 This averages $321.87 per mile for poles and cross arms, including labour. $44.25 for one wire gives actual cost of 1 wire.


STATEMENT OF C.P.R. REVENUE OF TELEGRAPH BUSINESS.


Earnings. Year ending .Tune 30. 1906. 1907. 1908.$ cts. 1,016,505 16 441,937 86 78,329 13 S cts. 1,243,276 16 $ cts. 1,173,859 33414,542 71 296,747 2383,218 98 81,319 525,005 32 5,217 47 3,586 133,059 60 3,835 42 3,700 5952,793 92 61,874 14 63,658 905,273 04 2,982 57 7,034 05 7,729 632,774 18 3,173 6960,557 17 55,333 80 55,793 028,160 68 8,342 36 7,910 0410,886 65 11,220 59 11,024 34 12,177 72Sundries 2,067 50 2,515 35 $1,687,558 60 $1,900,444 39 $1,713,219 82 Earnings. 1909. 1910. $ cts. $ cts. Local and C.P.R. proportion of conjoint. C.P.R. proportion of conjoint checks... Press Markets Guaranteed messages Cables, C.P.R. proportion Premiums and tolls on money transfers Connections Leased wires Pole rentals Weather reports Sundries Total 1,300,564 22 295,807 85 76,683 96 5,859 31 3,851 03 63,735 34 8,307 26 5,166 14 66,398 50 7,910 04 11,024 34 12,177 72 1,550,255 21 346,963 22 79,775 55 5,385 22 4,529 99 79,479 39 9,741 97 3,731 39 73,043 95 10,645 27 10,806 84 1,180 00 1,855,785 71 2,171,518 00 Mr. ARMSTRONG (E. Lambton) CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. Commercial Telegraph Lines. Earnings, Years 1885 to 1910 (Audit Office Statement of Earnings, Expenses and Net figures). Period. Earnings. Expenses. $ cts. 8 cts. Year ending June 30,'ll .. . 2,467,042.30 2.171.518.00 1,855,785.71 1,713,219,82 1,900,444.39 1,687,558.60 1,423,662.33 1,316,609.87 1.230.982.01 1,045,926.06 451.749.71 912.775.18 943,639.54 989,327.57 764,640.41 642,397.03 592,672.05 604,817.75 633,634.31 648,973.92 629,092.07 549.422.44 459.962.44 407,932.30 345.159.19 105.467.72 1,196,899.08 1,057,783.35 933,137.61 887,534.41 882,640.87 728,762.24 „ „ .. 30, '10 * .. u 30, '09 „ .. 30, '08 .. - 30, '07 30. '05 " M m 30, J04 590,722.89 547,438.15 492,902.88 218,295.29 , 30, '03 m t. 30, '02 Six months to t, 30, '01 Year ending Dec. 31, '00 31, '99 489,807.64 457,097.36 * 31, '98 31, '97 .1 .. „ 31, '96 336,030.71 m „ 31, '95 31, '94 it -ii „ 31, '93 342,411.52 335,736.80 ti i. „ 31, '92 [DOT]i i. ,i 31, '91 328,707.66 288,697.36 241.757.76 207.952.76 180,794.89 .1 „ 31, '90.... i. i. „ 31, ,89 31, '88 .1 .. .. 31, '87 " i, 31, '85 19,692.15 Net Earnings:. S cts. 1,270,143.22 1,113,734.65 922,648.15 825.685.41 1,017,803.52 958,796.36 788.229.83 725,886.98 683,543.86 553,023.18 233.454.42 449,259.13 453,831.95 532,230.21 387,063.72 306,566.32 290,410.71 262,406.23 297,897.51 302,987.53 300,384.41 260,725.08 218,204.68 199,979.64 164,364.30 54,848.47 65,773.04 They want to re-audit the Audit Office figures. Note.-The above statement of ' expenses ' does not include the following:- (a) Expenses for salaries and material carried in accounts of Railway Departments. Should not in any event. (b) Expenses for salaries and material carried in Railway Maintenance Appropriation Accounts. No reason to do so. (c) Rental of offices occupied by Telegraph Department at Vancouver, Lethbridge, Calgary, Revelstoke, Moosejaw, and Fort William, no charge being carried on the books of the railway company against the Telegraph Department. Help each other anyway. (d) Rental of right of way on railway company's property. Railway company has to have the telegraph system. (c) Interest on capital invested. Have to invest capital to run railway. (f) Proportion of expenses of general management, auditing, purchasing, engineering and law departments, which are borne by the railway company, and no proportion of which can be actually allocated to telegraph department. 72} Works both ways. Only a portion of latter should be charged. Now, let me take up a little of your time in calling your attention to the discrimination in rates on the part of this great company; and I wish it to he distinctly understood that I do not wish to antagonize that company in any particular. 1 give this statement merely to demonstrate to the House the advisability at least of investigating this whole question. I am satisfied that if that is done, we will come to the conclusion that these rates are exorbitant and unfair, especially to the people of the western provinces. I hope the day is not far distant when our telegraph rates to the western provinces will he one-half what they are to-day or even a great deal less, and I believe we could have them so if we had national-cwned telegraphs. Let me call your attention to the following rates: From Montreal to Toronto, 333 miles, 25c. Brandon to Moosejaw, approximately 265 miles, 40c.



Moosejaw to Swift Current, 175 miles, 40c. Regina to Saskatoon, 160 miles, 40c. Ottawa to Windsor, 482 miles, 25c. Regina to Calgary, 480 miles, 60c. Quebec to Toronto, 513 miles, 25c. [DOT] Brandon to Swift Current, 375 miles, 60c. Quebec to Windsor, 720 miles, 25c. Brandon to Calgary, 705 miles, 60c. Rimouski to Windsor, 900 miles, 25c. Winnipeg to Edmonton, 800 miles, 75c. Halifax to Schreiber, miles, 60c., with a relay at Sudbury and Montreal. Halifax to Thessalon, 75c. The last two are practically over the same wire. These figures go to show that discriminations are not in northwestern Canada alone.


LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL.

Are the rates the hon. gentleman has quoted all over the same lines or do they cover other lines?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF C.P.R. REVENUE OF TELEGRAPH BUSINESS.
Permalink

January 31, 1912