May 11, 1911

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

There is diligence up to a certain point, but in the end the question comes down to, what is the next available train? It may not come along for half a day.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

Nine hours in this instance.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

It seems unfortunate that one million people in the maritime provinces must have important mail communications delayed in this way. I did not know that this matter was to be brought up, and I have not before me the very strong representations which have been made to me, and which I have passed on to the Postmaster General. I would be glad if the Postmaster General would make a motion so that the document he has brought down may be put on the records of the House as I purpose bringing this matter up again for discussion.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

I will make the motion, but perhaps I could include it in ' Hansard '.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOEDEN (Halifax).

That will answer my purpose better. Perhaps it may be included in ' Hansard ' without objection.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Let it go as part of the answer of the minister.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

The memorandum is as follows:

Ottawa, Feb. 2, 1911.

With further reference to the question of employing a special train via the Intercolonial railway from Rimouski to Halifax for the conveyance of incoming British mails during the season of navigation on the St. Lawrence route, the Postmaster General is informed that during last season, that is from 29th April to 11th November, inclusive, twenty-nine steamers landed mails for the maritime provinces at Rimouski via Allan and Canadian Pacific railway line steamers.

A form showing the number of letter bags, newspaper bags and parcel post receptacles with their respective approximate weight, and approximate total weight, time of arrival at Rimouski and Halifax, also the detention at Rimouski, is attached. (The Controller regrets that he has no typewriter large enough for this work). Also attached is a return showing the gain in time that might have been made for each mail if a special train had been employed.

The cost of a special train would be as follows: 494.06 miles at $1.60 per mile, $741.09 per trip; for 29 trips a total cost of $21,491.61 for the whole season.

It is possible that the railway might claim double mileage between St. Flavie and Rimouski on the plea that it was necessary to make up the special train at a divisional point, in which case the cost would be $27.02 more per trip, or a total of $22,277.19 per season.

The average total weight of mail per trip last season was 10,678,-27 pounds.

With reference to the return showing the gain in hours effected by using a special train, it might be observed that mails would not be assorted on the special train and consequently matter for the northern portion of the maritime provinces would not reach destination in some cases as quickly as under the present system. The column showing gain in hours merely indicates the acceleration of mails for Halifax city on the basis of >16 hours running time for the special train from Rimouski to Halifax, Regular train, 200, covers the distance in 16 hours 39 minutes.

Where the gain shown is over 24 hours it will be observed that there has been unusual detention at Rimouski due to the steamer arriving shortly after the maritime train had passed Rimouski, and also the difference in the running time of a special and a regular train.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
Permalink

B. M. ARMSTRONG.


Controller. *If special trains had been employed no mails would be assorted in route, and allowing 16 hours for running time between Rimouski and Halifax, the mails would have arrived at Halifax as follows: April 29, 10.35 p.m. instead of 7.00 p.m April 30, Gain 20 hours, 25 minutes.May 6, 9.30 „ ii 5.40 ii May 7, ii 20 [DOT][DOT] 10 iiII 12, 7.00 „ ii 5.40 [DOT]1 .... M 13, ii 22 ii 40 ii„ 20, 3.30 „ ii 6.30 II .... It 20, ii 3 ii II 27, 4.50 " ii 5.45 „ „ 28, ii 23 ii 55 iiJune 4, 6.07 a.m. it 6.05 ii J une 4, ii 12 ii 2 itm 9, 4.48 p.m. ti 6.05 ii .... ii 10, ii 25 ii 17 iiii 17, 11.12 a.m. n 5.55 ii .... ii 17, ii 6 it 43 H 24, 6.10 „ it 2.00 ii .... it 24, ii 7 ii 50 iiJuly 1, 12.00 noon ii 4.25 it J uly 1, ii 4 it 25 >i,, 8, 5.00 a.m. ii 3.26 ii .... ii 8, ii 10 ii 26 iiII In, 8.50 „ ii 3.24 II .... M 15, it 6 it 34 iiII 22, 1.45 ii 3.25 II .... II 22, ii 13 ii 40 iiIt 29, 1.20 p.m. ii 3.00 II .... II 29, it l ii 40 iiAug. 5, 12.20 a.m. it 2.15 m Aug. 5, ii 13 ii 55 iiII 12, 8.30 „ 3.45 II .... II 12, ii 7 ii 45 iiII 18, 9.25 p.m. ii 12.00 II .... II 18, ii 2 ii 35 iiII 20, 3.30 „ ii 3.50 II .... II 26, ii 0 ii 20 iiSept. 1, 11.08 „ ii 3.15 [DOT]i Sept. 2, it 16 ii 7 iiii 9, 9.25 „ it 10.44 n .... ii 9, ii 1 ii 15 iiii 15, 11.00 „ 2.25 a.m ii 16, ii 3 ii 25 iin 23, 5.45 , ii 11.00 p.m 23, it 5 ii 15 u 29, 12.00 „ ii 3.35 it .... it 30, ii 15 H 35 iiOct. 8, 8.20 a.m. 2.00 H Oct. 8. ii 5 ii 40 ii[DOT], 14, 4.25 „ ii 2.45 ii .... 11 14, ii 10 H 20 iiI. 20, No gain. i, 29, 3.40 a.m. ti 6.00 it 29, ti 14 ii 20 iiNov. 3, 5.40 p.m. 7.20 ii ....Nov, 4, ii 25 ii 40 ii[DOT][DOT] U, 7.40 a.m. [DOT]i 7.15 [DOT] ii H, it 11 25 January 27, 1911. The Controller begs to inclose herewith a return showing the number of letter bags, newspaper bags and parcel post baskets received at Rimouski for the maritime provinces during the summer, and approximate weights, hour of arrival of this mail at Mr. LEMIEUX. . Rimouski station from the dock, hour of departure from Rimouski, time of detention at Rimouski and hour of arrival at Halifax, also a return in regard to the winter service showing the number of letter bags, newspaper bags and parcel post baskets arriving at Halifax for the maritime provinces, with approximate weights, also the hour of arrival of the Halifax mail at that post office. Mail for Halifax city during winter season is sent to that office as soon as received from the steamer, and mail for Nova Scotia is despatched by first outgoing train if connection is made. If connection is not made, this matter is sorted at North street station and despatched by first available trains. Mail for St. John city and New Brunswick is also despatched by first available trains, and the latter sorted on these trains. It might be noted that during the summer season the average detention at Bimouski of mails for the maritime provinces, owing to special trains not being used, is about 7 hours and 51 minutes, and the Controller would also add that from the 19th of June to the 33rd of October, two trains per day are operated from Montreal to Halifax, and from the opening of navigation to the 19th of June, and from the 23rd of October to the close of navigation, only one train is operated between Montreal and Halifax. Under the summer time-table on the Intercolonial railway, trains for Halifax pass Bimouski at 5.31 a.m. and 8.06 p.m., and when one through train only is operated, such train is due to pass Bimouski going east at 11.45 p.m.


BRITISH MAILS FOR MARITIME PROVINCES LANDED AT RIMOUSKI-SUMMER SEASON 1910.


K f i g a M Steamer. Date of Arrival. Number of Letter Bags. Approximate Weight. Number of News Bags. +3 o bp .§£ X! O M < Number of P. P. Baskets. Approximate Weight. Total Number of Articles. Approximate Total Weight. Hour of Arrival at Rimouski Station. Hour of Departure from Rimouski Station. Hours Detention at Rimouski. Hour of Arrival at Halifax. Note.Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. H. M. Empress of Britain April 29 ... 20 1,170 95 7,125 28 2,660 149 10,955 6.35 a.m. 11.45 p.m. 17 10 7.00 p.m., 30th Virginian May 23 1,035 121 9,075 28 2,660 172 12,770 5.30 a.m. 11.45 p.m. 18 15 5.40 p.m., 7th Empress of Ireland May 12.... 17 765 80 6,000 29 2,755 126 9,520 3.00 a.m. 11.45 p.m. 20 45 5.40 p.m., 13th V ictorian May 19.... 25 1,125 117 8,775 28 2,660 170 12,560 11.30 p.ffi. 11.45 p.m. 10 Empress of Britain May 26.... 24 1,080 98 7,350 24 2,280 146 10,710 1.50 a.m. 11.45 p.m. 21 55 5.45p.m., 28th Virginian June 3. . .. 25 1,125 144 10,800 23 2,185 192 14,110 2.07 p.m. 11.45 p.m. 9 38 9 [DOT]20 000 8^ fi ifin 20 -|9K Victorian June 16.... 2T 1,305 961 7'200 27 2,565 152 11,070 7.12 p.m. 11.45 p.m. 4 S3 u.uo p.m., J.UL11 5.55 p.m., 17th Empress of Britain June 23.... 28 1,260 107 8,025 23 2,185 158 11,470 2.10 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 5 56 2.00 p.m., 24th Virginian June 30.... 24 1,080 98 7,350 18 1,710 140 10,140 8.00 p.m. 8.06 p. m. 06 Empress of Ireland July 7.... 23 1,035 82 6,150 22 2,090 127 9,275 1.00 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 7 06 3.26 p.m., 8 th Victorian July 14.... 27 1,215 98 7,350 19 1,805 144 10,370 4.50 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 3 16 Empress of Britain July 21.... 23 1,035 102 7,650 24 2,280 149 10,965 9.45 a.m. 8.06 p.m. 10 21 3.25 p.m., 22nd Virginian July 28.... 23 1,035 86 6,450 22 2,090 131 9,575 9.20 p.m. 9.20 p.m. none. 3.00 p.m., 29th *Empress of Ireland Aug. 4.... 20 900 99 7,425 21 1,995 140 10,320 8.20 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 11 46 2.15 p.m., 5th Victorian Aug. 11.... 27 1,215 88 6,600 13 1,235 128 9,050 4.30 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 3 30 Empress of Britain Aug. 18.... 23 1,035 177 5,775 19 1,805 119 8,615 5.25 a.m. 5.15 a.m. 12.00 p.m., 18th *"V irginian Aug. 25.... 27 1,215 99 7.425 19 1,805 145 10,445 11.30 p.m. 11.30 p.m. 3.50 p.m., 26th *Empress of Ireland Sept. 1.... 20 900 24 6,300 15 1,425 119 8,625 7.48 a.m. 8.06 p.m. 12 18 3.15 p.m., 2nd Victorian Sept. 9.... 26 1,170 86 6,450 23 2,185 135 9,805 5.25 a.m. 5.25 a.m. 10.40 p.m., 9th *Empress of Britain Sept. 15.... 24 1,080 90 6,750 21 1,995 135 9,825 7.00 a.m. 7.00 a.m. 2.25 a.m., 16th *Virginian Sept. 22.... 24 1,080 103 7,725 34 3,230 161 12,035 1.45 a.m. 5.21 a.m. 3 36 Empress of Ireland . Sept. 29.... 21 945 76 5,700 22 2,090 119 8,735 8.00 a.m. 8.06 p.m. 12 06 3.35 p.m., 30th Victorian.... Oct. :7.... 25 1.125 115 8.625 21 1,995 161 11,745 4.20 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 3 46 2.00 p.m., 8th Empress of Britain Oct. 13.... 24 1,080 97 7,275 29 2,755 150 11,110 12.25 p.m. 8.06 p.m. 7 41 2.45 p.m., 14th Virginian Oct. 20.... 27 1,215 103 7,725 26 2,470 156 11,410 11.10 p.m. 11.10 p.m. 2.65 p.m., 21st *Empress of Ireland Oct. 28.... 19 855 91 6,825 26 2,470 136 10,150 11.20 a m. 11.45 p.m. 12 25 Victorian Nov. 3... . 26 1,170 123 9.225 29 2,755 178 13,150 1 40 a.m. 11.45 p.m. 22 05 7.20 p.m., 4 th Empress of Britain Nov. 10.... 27 1,215 101 7,575 30 2,850 158 11,640 3.40 p.m. 11.45 p.m. 8 05 7.15 p.m., 11th * Trains held for connection. O O K o 8


THE BANK ACT.

CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAUGHTON LENNOX (Simcoe).

Now that we have come to a definite understanding as to when the House will adjourn, I desire to ask two questions, one of which is: Does the Minister of Finance intend to deal with the Bank Act Before we adjourn? I assume it will be impossible for the minister to do so, but I shall be glad to hear from him on that point. My second question is: Can the

Minister of Finance assure the House now that when we resume after adjournment the Act relating to banks and banking will be disposed of during the balance of the session? The minister pointed out before that press of business prevented it, but I would anticipate that when we reassemble in July there will be an opportunity. I trust the minister will be able to assure the House that the matter will then be taken up and disposed of.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE BANK ACT.
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. IIELDING.

I doubt if there will be the opportunity my hon. friend suggests when we reassemble in July. I would like to keep an open mind on that, but for the present I do not anticipate that we will be [DOT]able to proceed this session, either during the present part of it or when we resume, with a general revision of the Bank Act. I have given notice of another Bill respecting the Bank Act, the purpose of which is to continue the bank charters for a period [DOT]of one year. The charters will expire at an early date and it is most desirable from all points of view that whatever we may do bereaftei'" these charters should be continued for that period. This Bill will be brought forward before the recess, but as to what may happen at the later stage of the -session I do not wish to speak too definitely; my impression is that the House will bave its hands very full at that time, and [DOT]will not have time to proceed with a gen

eral revision of the Bank Act.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE BANK ACT.
Permalink

CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY-GUARANTEE OF BONDS.


Mr. GRAHAM moved that the House go into committee to consider certain proposed resolutions respecting aid to be granted to the Canadian Northern Railway Company for the construction of lines of Tailway therein mentioned. He said: Mr. ^Speaker, in rising to move that you do leave the chair, in order to proceed in committee with the resolutions standing :in my name, I feel that these resolutions not only are of great interest to the people of Canada, but include a bargain which when consummated, will be of the utmost advantage to the entire Dominion. Those who have not visited Canada from one end to the other will perhaps not be so thoroughly seized with enthusiasm 278 as those who have, as to the present prospects and future greatness- of the country in which we live. I feel confident that the fathers of confederation scarcely dreamed of the fabric that was to be erected on the foundations which they laid. Not only are Canadians enthusiastic over our country, but those who come to us from all parts of the world are deeply enthusiastic, and I think the most loud in their proclamations of the natural wealth and advantages of Canada are those who have come to us from across the border, from the south. When I became Minister of Railways and Canals, I set about trying to inform myself as to what were the necessities of Canada from a transportation standpoint. I was thoroughly convinced, and I have been more than confirmed in that view, that one of the most interesting problems we had to solve and one which was of the deepest import to our people was that of how to get their goods to and from market quickly and at a fair rate. The people who have quick and cheap transportation in any country, if the country be any good, are the people who are prosperous, and every farthing we can cut from the price of the carrying of a product to market adds something to the value of the labour that brings forth that product. In travelling through the west during the past season, I endeavoured to secure and assimilate all the information I could get in reference to this great problem. I found that we had several United States lines running into the west and giving certain accommodation. I found that the pioneer road, the Canadian Pacific railway, had stretched its branches in many directions, and was giving a good service over two main lines, the main line proper and that by way of Crowsnest Pass, and that the „ people it reached, while sometimes complaining of what they thought were exorbitant freight rates were nevertheless pretty well served. I found too that the Grand Trunk Pacific had a magnificent line from Winnipeg to Edmonton. I think it is not exaggerating to say that it is the best line of new construction ever built on the continent of America. I might go further, but I think that is sufficiently strong. That line at present is not only stretching on to Prince Albert, but is also reaching out with its branches. This year the Grand Trunk Pacific is building as its programme in the west something like 700 miles, the Canadian Pacific railway about the same, and the Canadian Northern railway approximately the same. That is a large mileage for construction in one year, considering the population, but not a great mileage, considering the vast expanse of territory. In addition to these two I found in the Canadian west to the north that the Canadian Northern railway had a system including no less than



4,000 miles of railway. That in itself is a great system, serving largely the territory to the north; it runs through what to my mind will eventually become a centre of mixed farming and dairying for the Dominion of Canada. The Canadian Pacific railway stretches through to Vancouver. From Prince Rupert the Grand Trunk Pacific stretches out eastward, to meet the main line at Wolfe's Creek, and by an arrangement with the British Columbia government, the Canadian Northern railway is now constructing a line which will reach from the Yellowhead Pass through the province of British Columbia down to the city of Vancouver. When this is completed, the west will be pretty well served as to main lines. That great country west of the Great Lakes will be connected by two main lines, the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Pacific railway, with the Canadian ports in the east. Travelling through the western country and over the systems of railway there, one could not but be struck with the fact that while the Canadian Northern railway is serving a large territory, _ and a large number of people in gathering the products of the west, it had no way of sending these products to the east. And I was imnressed-and I believe the people of Canada will be impressed op making the same examination-with the necessity of having that system of 4,000 miles west of the great lakes connected as soon as possible with Canadian ports on the east. The Canadian Northern, in addition to its lines west of Winnipeg-the main line runing to Edmonton, and miles west -has a line stretching from Winnipeg to Port Arthur. From Port Arthur to Sudbury, or a few miles north and west of Sudbury, it has no connection. The present resolution which I am asking hon. gentlemen to conside" will, among other things, provide for the furnishing of that link. At the present time, the Canadian Northern has, under the name of the Canadian Northern Ontario, a line running from Toronto to Sudbury, and from Sudbury to Sellwood, but it has no line connection further west. The connecting of the lines from Port Arthur eastward will give the city of Toronto, and all the province of Ontario another through route to the great west. Coming east from Sellwood ,it is proposed that the line shall run eastward touching North Bay. Before it reaches North Bay and in that vicinity it will traverse the southern portion of what is known as the clay belt of Ontario. Now, Mr. Speaker, with all due deference to hon. gentlemen coming from other parts of Canada, let me say that there is as much good land in Ontario that has never been cultivated as there is in that province now under cultivation, and in all the discussion of opening new territory we from this Mr GRAHAM province have a deep interest in seeing that this uncultivated part of our province is brought under the plough. There is in that territory, according to surveys, from 16,000,000 to 20,000,000 acres of good clay soil. The Grand Trunk Pacific runs through the northern portion of it. The Canadian -Northern will run more towards the southern border of this belt. The Canadian Pacific Tailway practically does not touch it at all. Coming eastward from Port Arthur, except, for a few miles, the Canadian Northern will serve an absolutely new country from that now served by either the Canadian Pacific railway or the Grand Trunk Pacific. Except in one or two instances, if I remember the figures correctly, this new line will not come nearer than twenty miles to any of the existing roads, and in many places it will be fr)om 50 to 60 miles from the Grand Trunk Pacific and from 20 to 40 miles from the Canadian Pacific railway. Coming eastward and passing North Bay, the road will proceed down through the province of Ontario, onening up a new country until it strikes the county of Renfrew. And in [DOT] mg native county of Renfrew, it will give railway communication to places which have never had it all these years. There are parts of the county through which I was carried on horseback, and later rode on horseback, through which I hope, before long, to ride on a first class train.


CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART (Lanark).

Does it go to Pembroke?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY-GUARANTEE OF BONDS.
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

Yes. Coming eastward from Pembroke it crosses to the Quebec side at Portage du Fort, an,4 then at Chats Falls crosses again into the province of Ontario, and comes on down to Rideau Junction, five miles outside of the city of Ottawa, where it joins the Niagara and Montreal line. Proceeding eastward from Ottawa it will go to Hawkesbury, the distance from the junction to Hawkesbury, if I remember well, being something like 56 miles. It will then cross the interprovincial bridge, about 1.1 miles in length into the province of Quebec. This bridge is not now of proper standard for the line and will have to be brought up to standard. Then, from a point on the Quebec side apposite Hawkesbury, it will proceed to the city of Montreal. The total mileage of this line will be approximately 1,000 miles, perhaps a little more, but I think not any less.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY-GUARANTEE OF BONDS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

Is the route stated in so indefinite a manner in the resolution?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY-GUARANTEE OF BONDS.
Permalink

May 11, 1911