May 11, 1911


He said: I have to state that, His Excellency the Governor General, having been apprised of the subject matter of this resolution, commends it to the favourable consideration of the House.


CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

How long have these judges held their offices?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ANNUITIES TO JUDGES IN YUKON TERRITORY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

This is only a notice of motion.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ANNUITIES TO JUDGES IN YUKON TERRITORY.
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Motion agreed to.


NEWSPAPER STATEMENTS AFFECTING HON. MR. OLIVER.


On the orders of the day being called:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER moved:

That the special committee to inquire into statements in regard to the Hon. Frank Oliver, Minister of the Interior, mentioned in the resolution of this House, passed on the 3rd day of May inst., do consist of Messrs. Clarke (Essex), Carvell, Geoffrion, Meighen and Crothers.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NEWSPAPER STATEMENTS AFFECTING HON. MR. OLIVER.
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Motion agreed to.


BARRINGTON PASSAGE BAIT FREEZER.

CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON.

Before the orders of the day are called, I would like to ask when we may expect a return with reference to a bait freezing establishment at Barrington Passage ordered on 28th of February last. The minister some time ago said it would be brought down shortly, hut it is not here yet, and I am anxious to get it.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   BARRINGTON PASSAGE BAIT FREEZER.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I shall have the matter looked into at once.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   BARRINGTON PASSAGE BAIT FREEZER.
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NIAGARA FALLS WATER-POWER.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

Before the orders of the day are called, I would like to bring to the attention of the government a notice which I observed in the press of the United States respecting a fight- being made by the American Civic Association against a threatened depredation and despoliation of Niagara Falls. The statement issued by that association is in part as follows, according to this press report:

The situation is peculiar. The waterways treaty with Canada, signed January 11, 1909. while apparently limiting the amount of water which might he taken from the falls, has, on the contrary, increased this diversion. The power development companies have taken advantage of the outside limitations of the treaty and to-day are demanding what will come to 68 per cent more water than is now being drawn into the tunnels for the purpose of turning the giant turbine engines.

Next Wednesday, the 10th instant, the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations will have before it joint resolution No. 3, offered by Senator Burton, of Ohio. This resolution has been prepared in order to save Niagara from Sir ALLEN AYLESWORTH.

the interests which are attempting to wrest additional free power for their private use.

It is estimated that the failure of the Burton resolution will mean an increased income of approximately $5,000,000 annually for the companies back of the opposition. The method by which the amount of water necessary to yield this enormous return can be taken under cover of the law is simple. The treaty has established what is known as a maximum limit of diversion of 56,000 cubic feet per second; that is to say, 25 per cent of the average flow of 222,400 cubic feet per second, and 30 per cent of other ordinary low water flow of 180,000 cubic feet. These amounts were allowed for diversions for specific purpose of power production. But the treaty places no limit on the amount of water that may be taken for sanitary and domestic purposes, thus leaving the way open for still greater diversions. The new enterprises ready to start up work on this basis, together with the increasing diversion sought by the existing plants, fully warrant the general alarm least the national ownership of Niagara shall whether wholly or in part pass into untrustworthy and irreverent private hands.

I observe also that in the same statement issued by this association it is alleged that $40,000,000 worth of capital is now invested by those who desire to consummate the purposes alluded to in this statement. I think this matter worthy of being brought to the attention of the government for the reasons contained in the latter part of the statement, namely, that although the treaty restricts the maximum limit of diversion to 56,000 cubic feet per second, there is an attempt to take advantage of that provision in the treaty, which permits diversion for sanitary and domestic purposes. It is clearly, therefore, the duty of this government to make some inquiry as to whether any such attempt is about to be carried out; and if so it is desirable that this government should make a strong protest against it.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NIAGARA FALLS WATER-POWER.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

I have been giving some attention to this matter and have some papers bearing on the subject which I have not with me at present. I shall be glad if mv hon. friend will send me the newspaper clipping he has read, and to-morrow I shall be able to make a statement with regard to the subject. _

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NIAGARA FALLS WATER-POWER.
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ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.

LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

I would like to bring to the attention of the Postmaster General a subject that is of deep importance to the people of New Brunswick and the other eastern provinces. I refer to the deliveries o+ the English mails in the east. Last week a business man in Moncton wrote me, that:

The 'Virginian' arrived at Rimouski at 6.25 Saturday morning, four passengers and mails for the east. She left Rimouski at 15.12 in the afternoon on a local train for Camp-

bellton; detention nine hours at Rimouski. Arrived at Campbellton at 20.35; transferred from local to freight train and left Campbellton on freight train at 22.15 Saturday night; difference in time makes detention there one hour and twenty minutes.

Arrived at Moncton at G.40 Sunday morning; carried Moncton mails along with them to St. John-(we received Moncton mails at 11 o'clock Monday morning). Transferred at Moncton to another freight train on Sunday morning for Halifax. I do not know whether they have arrived there or not.

Considerable delay always occurs, but this seems to have been quite unusual. The further statement of my correspondent is to the effect, that he had letters and papers mailed to him in London on the 28th April via the Canadian route, and that they only arrived in Moncton on Monday, or about 13 days later.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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CON

George Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR (Leeds).

They ought to engage an ox team.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

My correspondent goes on to say that papers and letters mailed April 28th to him from London via New York reached him Saturday afternoon, whereas those mailed him on the 26th April by the Canadian route only arrived on Monday, 8th May and took 13 days to get to Moncton, as compared with seven and a half days via New York. He adds that he has given orders to have his mail matter sent in future by the New York route. There must certainly be something, wrong on the part of the Postmaster General's Department or some other department with respect to the disributipn of the English mails in the maritime provinces. The mails from Moncton and the east which arrived at Rimouski on Saturday morning last were received at Moncton and Halifax and Campbellton many hours after the mails, which had arrived at Rimouski for Manitoba and the west had reached Winnipeg. This is a matter which demands the attention of the Postmaster General. This complaint is not a new one, but one of long standing, and it seems to me that the time has come when a remedy should be applied.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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CON

Adam Brown Crosby

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CROSBY.

Strong protests have been sent from the Halifax Board of Trade to the Postmaster General, and probably to the Minister of Railways, complaining of the present mail service to Nova Scotia and the east. When the steamship arrives at Rimouski there is great anxiety to transfer the mails for the west in the quickest time, and properly so, but in the rush, the east appears to be overlooked, and on many occasions our letters have been delayed for three or four days. The Board of Trade have addressed me on the subject, but having a high opinion of the executive ability of the Postmaster General, I thought the evil would be remedied without my urging him very strongly. In that I am sorry to say I am mistaken. I hope the Postmaster General will have the matter attended to at once, and that we will get our mails in Halifax via the Canadian route at least as speedily as via New York.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX (Postmaster General).

I have with me a return which was asked for earlier in the session by the leader of the opposition, and which deals with the whole question of the mail service for the east. When the mail steamer arrives at Rimouski, she is met by a special tender manned by our own crew and the bags and the baskets are at once transferred to the wharf at Rimouski. I may say that this mail matter has increased six or seven hundred per cent in the last few years. There is a large quantity of mail for the east, but of course there is a far greater quantity for the west. Sometimes the steamer is delayed and, the train for Rimouski leaves for the east on time, and the mails have to be placed on the next train which causes delay. At the demand of the steamship companies, we have decided that in future the mails for the west will be landed at Quebec, taken by the Canadian Pacific railway to Montreal, and there distributed for western points. The mails for the east will be delivered at Rimouski and put on the first available train. The delay is due to the Intercolonial railway at times, and to the steamer at other times, but so far as the post office is concerned, it does all it can to expedite the mails. The return which I have here gives, all information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ENGLISH MAIL SERVICE TO THE MARITIME PROVINCES.
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May 11, 1911