May 10, 1911

CON

Arthur Samuel Goodeve

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GOODEVE.

I have no desire to offer any criticism to the suggested programme outlined by the First Minister. I would like to emphasize the suggestion offered by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Borden) that as the 23rd of May will be a Tuesday, by adjourning on the previous Friday, the 19th of May, there would not be a great deal of time lost, none that could not be made up by sitting a little later at night. A large portion of the time of the western members will be taken up in going to and coming from our several homes, six days each way, and to some extent the same thing applies to the eastern members. We have already had two adjournments in this long session, at Christmas and Easter, and with this third adjournment each western member will have lost 36 days in travelling during these recesses.

The date fixed for the reassembling of parliament is in the middle of the very hottest season in Ottawa. We have had a strenuous session owing to illness during the hard and unusual winter, and I know that our western members rather enjoy our own mild climate and consider it quite a hardship to have to come back here in the intense heat. For that reason I would again suggest that instead of Tuesday, July 18, the Prime Minister should make the date two weeks later, Tuesday, August 1.

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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

As I may not be present when the items to which the Prime Minister has referred are under discussion I take this opportunity of saying that I have recently been through portions of the Northwest territories, and if ever men earned a trip to the coronation, the Mounted police during the past winter have earned it. From scores of sources I learned that every new homesteader in the Canadian Northwest, so far as could possibly be ascertained, and they were well looked up, was visited once or twice every month during the stern winter endured in the Northwest and they were asked if they were in want of food or fuel. I take this opportunity of mentioning to the First Minister that this was very highly appreciated all through the Northwest.

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

Coming from the extreme east, I would endorse the remarks made by my hon. friend from Kootenay, who speaks for the extreme west. A large number of the members of the House live comparatively near Ottawa and can return home almost any time by a few hours' rail journey and one day is the same to them as another; but to those who live

more than a thousand miles away every day counts, and if the House would adjourn on Friday, May 19, many of us could spend Sunday at home and gain practically 5 days with a loss of only 2 to the service of the House. As has been suggested we could sit later on the last two days to make up for the time. With respect to coming back on the 1st of August instead of the 18th of July, if the government could see its way clear to meet that suggestion, I am sure it would he approved of by hon. gentlemen on both sides of the House, who have to come extreme distances.

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CON

John Dowsley Reid

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID (Grenville).

Coming from a point close to Ottawa I certainly have no reason to complain at the House sitting until May 23 and resuming on July 18, but I think there is another reason why we should try if possible to adjourn on Friday, and that is the 24th of May is a public holiday. There is not a constituency I believe in Canada in which there will not be a celebration of some kind on that day, and I think every member would like to be present if possible at these celebrations. Personally I am willing to do everything to hurry the work through so as to adjourn on Friday. As to resuming on July 18, the Prime Minister will agree that July is generally the holiday month of the year. Every person endeavours to go for a holiday in that month, and the very fact of having to come back on the 18th of July will interfere not only with the members but with their families. We could also perhaps help to rush the work through after we came back on the 1st of August if we adjourned until that date. So far as I am concerned I really think that if the right hon. the Prime Minister can possibly see his way clear to adjourn until the 1st of August it would be much better. It would certainly be of great assistance to members by enabling them to give their families the usual benefit of the summer vacations. I hope the Prime Minister will see his way to an adjournment to the 1st of August.

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LIB

Michael Clark

Liberal

Mr. CLARK (Red Deer).

In case an endorsement from this side should add force to the suggestion from my hon. friend the leader of the opposition, I should like to add my very frank approval of it. There is no need for me to add anything to what has been said by hon. gentlemen opposite on the point. It is apparent that those of us who come from very great distances in the west have great advantage to gain by getting away from here on Friday night instead of having to remain until the following Tuesday. There is very much force also in what my hon. friend from Grenville (Mr. Reid) has said as to the desirability of our being at home for the various functions to be held to celebrate one of

the most important holidays not only in this country but in the empire. ,

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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

I think that my right hon. friend the Prime Minister is convinced as to the desirability of an earlier adjournment in May; but looking at him intentlv, I cannot come to the conclusion that he is convinced of the desirability of our reassembling later than July 18. But there is one argument which I would like to adduce what might have some weight with him. The Prime Minister has on previous occasions been over on functions something similar to the one now facing him. He knows the difficulties, the troubles, the menaces, gastronomic and otherwise, which he will have to face; and though his robust constitution may enable him to live through it all and resume work on the 18th of July with his usual vigour, his less robust colleagues, who are to accompany him, will probably not find themselves in as good condition in a sanitary sense. I submit therefore as an unanswerable argument, that, after these functions cn the other side are through, he should provide them with a fortnight's rest at some good cure where they can renew their vigour, and so be ready for work.

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CON

George Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR (Leeds).

I am sure that 1 speak the sentiments of my hon. friend the Minister of Railways (Mr. Graham) when I say that those of us who live among the Thousand Islands do not want to be dragged away from them on the 18th of July. I am satisfied further that the Minister of Railways requires some rest as he has been under the weather lately. For myself if the Prime Minister wants to bring us back in the dog days I can stand it, but I would much prefer that we should meet on the 1st of August.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

There is just one othei argument that might be advanced. I noticed a cartoon in one of the papers the other day which depicted the Prime Minister as being troubled concerning the nurse he was leaving in charge of an infant called reciprocity, which was bawling with mouth open from ear to ear. The only way to keep it asleep during his absence from parliament was for the nurse to dose it with chloroform and paregoric; but if the House adjourned, on the Friday instead of the Monday following, there would be three days less time during which that infant would be required to be kept asleep.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I think the infant is vigorous and kicking, and in no need of paregoric. I have listened carefully to everything that has been said. I am only the servant of the House, and want to consult the views of the House as much as possible. We are here, however,, to do certain work, and that work must be,

done. My hon. friend from Kootenay (Mr, Goodeve) suggests that we should adjourn on the Friday preceding the 23rd of May. I shall not be here at that time, and if any modifications are to be made to the programme I have suggested, there is nothing to prevent their being made if the House will sit late and begin business early. Perhaps it would be well that we should begin morning sittings immediately, say next Monday, and in that way get through the work quicker. But there is certain work to be done as to which we cannot agree. For instance, if we were to discuss reciprocity at present, my hon. friends opposite would not be disposed to facilitate the business of the House. There is, however, other business as to which we can agree, and which can be disposed of. If it be found that the legislation on the programme is advanced sufficiently, the House might agree to advance the adjournment from the 23rd to the 19th. With regard to the other suggestion, that we should not meet again until the 1st of August, that is a matter largely in the hands of the House.

If the House will agree to vote sufficient Supply to carry us on a decent time, we might meet later, but if we have Supply voted only to the 1st of September, we shall have to resume business on the 18th of July.

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CIVIL SERVICE ACT-AMENDMENT.


House went into committee _ to consider the following proposed resolution: Resolved, that it is expedient to amend the Civil Service Act and the Acts in amendment thereof, and to provide as follows: 1. As seotion 39,' subsection 2. That a person who has served over three years as a clerk in the outside service of the Customs may be appointed to the rank of senior clerk, subject to such examination on the duties of office and other qualifications as is prescribed by the deputy head in a report to be concurred in by the head of the department. The salary of such senior clerk shall be from $1,200 to $1,600 per annum. 2. That the part of Schedule 'B' of the Civil Service Act which relates to Customs be repealed and the following substituted therefor:


SCHEDULE 'B,' CUSTOMS.


Higher Classes. Collectors Chief inspector Inspector of ports Assistant inspectors Chief clerks Surveyors Assistant surveyors (comprising tide surveyors, chief landing waiters and chief lookers) Salary per annum, from ft ft ft tt t« tt tt tt Technical Officers. Dominion appraisers Salary per annum, from Appraisers " " Assistant appraisers Gaugers Other Classes. Senior clerks Salary per annum, from Clerks and landing waiters Examining officers (including preventive officers whose duties are not chiefly clerical, and lockers) Packers and messengers Increase. $ 300 to $1,500 Nil, 3,200 ft 4,000 Nil.2,100 tt 3,200 7001,G00 tt 2.000 2001,200 ft 2.100 1001.200 ft 2,800 4001,200 tt 1,600 400$2,100 to $2,600 5001,200 " 2,400 400900 " 1.600 100900 " 1,600 400$1,200 to $1,600 400400 tt 1.200 Nil,100 tt 1,000 Nil400 tt 800 200


LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Hon. WM. PATERSON (Minister of Customs).

$1,200 is now the maximum of those clerks who come under the 1st resolution. There are many in the service who have been there many years, and have attained to their maximum, and to whom we cannot grant any increased salary. Considering their position and responsibilities, it is thought desirable that those who have been in the service some time, and have proved themselves qualified under examination, might be promoted to a new class, Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

to be called the rank of senior clerk, with a maximum of $1,600.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

The trouble is that this includes those who had been employed in this capacity for only three years. It seems to me this might result in bringing into the service men' of limited experience and equally limited knowledge. It might be used as a scheme to transfer men from one position in the service to another, giving them a much larger salary than their

*qualifications would entitle them to. I could understand this applying to men who have been for a considerable length of time in the outside service, but three years is only a limited time.

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LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Mr. PATERSON.

Many of these have been in the service for far longer than three years. This will apply to those who, besides having had the length of service provided for, have the necessary qualification, to be ascertained by an examination. Without this amendment we could not advance these clerks though some of them have been for years at $1,200.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

But the limit should be made greater than three years.

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LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Mr. PATERSON.

I would rather the hon. gentleman (Mr. Sproule) would not take exception to that. For it might exclude some who should not be excluded, and three years is a fair test.

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CON
LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Mr. PATERSON.

The hon. gentleman (Mr. Blain) will see that it is to be an examination on the duties of office, and that there are to be other qualifications as prescribed by the deputy head in a report to . be concurred in by the head of the department.

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May 10, 1911