May 10, 1911

LIB

William Cameron Edwards

Liberal

Mr. EDWARDS.

I am under the impression that there is a law in the province of Ontario fixing the weight of a bag of potatoes at 90 pounds. I can see that it would be a nice thing to have a uniform standard for the whole Dominion. But I think if the weight is changed from 90 to 80 pounds it will cause a great deal of confusion and inconvenience in the province of Ontario. There is another thing that strikes me. Suppose you fix the weight at 80 pounds. People have been accustomed to look upon a bag of potatoes as containing a bushel and a half, and in a bushel and a half there are six pecks. Now six pecks divides readily in 90 pounds, giving 15 pounds to a peck, and merchants who frequently sell potatoes by the peck would be put to inconvenience if the weight was changed to 80 pounds to the bag.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE ACT AMENDMENT.
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CON

George Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR (Leeds).

Now that the minister has fixed a standard weight for all the articles mentioned in the Bill, and in section 2 has fixed a standard for potatoes sold by the bag, I would suggest that he -amend section 2 to read as follows:

Any article mentioned in this subsection, if sold by the bag, shall contain one and a half bushels of the standard weight of the article.

Then people will know what they are doing.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE ACT AMENDMENT.
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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

That is a reasonable proposition, but I would not like to accept it without consulting with the officers of the department. I move that the committee rise and report progress.

Progress reported.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE ACT AMENDMENT.
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SUPPLY.


House again in Committee of Supply. Civil Government-Privy Council office-to provide for one clerkship, second division, subdivision A, $1,600.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

The explanation for this addition to the number of clerks in the Privy Council is found in a letter from Mr. Parmelee, the King's Printer, to Mr. Boudreau, Clerk of the Privy Council. It is dated March 22, 1911:

Dear Mr. Boudreau,-The experts who were called upon to investigate conditions at the

Bureau have laid great emphasis upon the abuses prevalent in connection with the translating of copy for the printers. They point out that the Bureau has for many years gone beyond the scope of its duties in employing its own proof readers to do translating and to make corrections in connection with translated copy, and for this work the proof readers receive extra pay in addition to their regular salaries.

Speaking of the difficulties created for the Bureau by differences of opinion as to correct translation the experts state as follows:- ' Whole sentences are recast after the matter has been put into type for no better reason than that in the opinion of the changer, they are more suitable translations than were given in the original manuscript. It is safe to say that the composition of the publications translated into French cost twice as much at it would were it properly translated and legible copy furnished/

A full report of the conditions in this connection, by the experts, will be found in the report submitted to His Excellency the Governor General in Council, by the Hon. Mr. Murphy, page 27 and appendices C and D following, and- I shall be grateful if you will do me the favour of reading these sections of the report in order that you may be fully impressed as to the abuses therein indicated.

Upon this Mr. Boudreau sent the following meimo:

Memo, for the president of the Privy Council.

The King's Printer, in a letter dated the 22nd of March inst. with reference to the translation of orders in council published in the official ' Gazette ' says that he is ' directed to state that in the light of the report of experts, his department will no longer assume responsibility for errors in translated copy, and that hereafter no translating of any kind will be done at the Bureau.'

Every week an average of about 15 columns of the ' Official Gazette ' will have to be translated by the Privy Council office, which would require the services of a well qualified translator.

The Clerk of the Privy Council could not undertake to do the work himself as he is often absent on official business. There is no other clerk in the office who could do the work. Consequently it would be advisable to create a i>osition in class A of the second division.

Eespectfullv submitted,

RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

Ottawa, 24th March, 1911.

Upon the following recommendation made by myself to the Privy Council, an order was passed:

The undersigned has the honour to recommend that the of the Privy

Council office as fixed by order in council of the 25th January, 1909, be further amended to add an additional clerkship to subdivision A of the second division, provision to be made by parliament at this present session.

This recommendation was approved and this was the reason for this item.

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LIB
CON
LIB
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

This is one of the items the right hon. gentleman mentioned: this afternoon as requiring to be voted for the whole year?

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

No, that is not one.

Royal Northwest Mounted Police-Coronation contingent-required to meet the transportation and other expenses of the R. N. W. M. Police, $30,000.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

This is to provide for a contingent of 75 men and horses at $400 per head.

Steam service between Annapolis and London or Hull, England, or both, $5,000.

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CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNOX.

-I runidensliood- from a statement which I heard the leader of the opposition make at six o'clock that the understanding between the right- hon. gentleman and him was that only -such items as were mentioned this afternoon would be submitted to the committee to-night. On account of a ball at Government House there is a very -slim attendance -here, and the impression this afternoon was that we would only sit until about nine o'clock.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

That was my understanding. The right hon. gentlemajj mentioned certain items which required to be granted in toto, and said that only a proportionate amount of the others would be voted.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I said this afternoon that I had an understanding with my hon. friend on the opposite side that the estimates should be advanced. The question was how much. It was understood that certain items would be voted in full and that the others would be voted to at least one-third of their amount. We have received already two-twelfths. My impression was that if, on the 23rd the estimates had not been passed, of what remained, we should get three-twelfths to carry us to the 1st of September. Whether we take the 'whole or three-twelfths does not matter much to me. Ifut I said that, in any event, some estimates would have to be passed entirely or we could not carry on the business of the country. For instance, the payment of the treaty Indians. We have to start parties north very soon and the Indians must be paid the whole of their indemnity. The coronation contingent must be paid1 the whole of their indemnity. The full amount for the Festival of Empire must be paid. Whether my understanding of the arrangement is correct or not is of little moment to me -at the present time. The Minister of Trade and Com-

merce is not in this House, and he has entrusted me with carrying his estimates. This is the only time I can give to explanation for the committee so as to have these passed.

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CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNON.

The First Minister has gone far beyond what I mentioned. With a great deal of what he has said I can entirely concur. I mentioned that 1 had overheard, as I passed, my leader make a statement from which I understood that, so far as to-night is concerned, the Prime Minister would not wish to take up any items except those mentioned that would have to be passed in toto. I called attention to this as we were asked to take up the estimates of the Department of Trade and Commerce. As to the broader question what we should do between this and the 23rd, I was not at all referring to. But I may say that if 1 thought we were going through the estimates generally to-night I would probably have brought up the matter we were speaking of yesterday. But I understood the Prime Minister wanted to go on with some things before going away and i did not wish to block him. But i do not need to deal with that matter, as my leader (Mr. Borden, Halifax) is here and he will know what to do.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

1 think the Prime Minister is right in his understanding of what the general programme is to be. We are to give one-fourth, or three months' supply to September i. But between now and the day of adjournment we are to go on with Supply, and with the business of the House as usual. I quite agree with that understanding. So far as the business to-night is concerned, there may be a little misapprehension-not between the Prime Minister and myself, but between myself and my hon. friends on this side-who thought that other items were to be taken up. I do not think that the hon. member from North Toronto (Air. Foster), expected that the items of trade and commerce would be taken up to-night. However, we might do something at it, for a while anyway.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I have been wanting for two or three days to take up the trade and commerce estimates, because I have been charged with it by my colleague, the Minister of Trade and Commerce. I would not take the Mouse by surprise, and if there were objections l would not press the matter. But if I might, 1 would like to reserve any points for further consideration later on.

Steam service between Annapolis and London or Hull, England, or both, $5,000.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

This and succeeding items, down to and including 231, involve nothing new except m one or possibly two cases. The others are as they have been for some years past. Therefore,

1 do not think they are contentious matters at all. In the item:

Steam service between Bonaventure river, Quebec, Petit Rocher and Bathurst, N.B., triweekly, during the season of 1911, $5,000.

There has been an increase of $2,000. The reason is that we have not been able to keep the service alive for the lormer subsidy of $3,000. The next is:

Steam service between Canada and Australia on the Pacific ocean, $180,509.

The most important item of change is here. 1 move that, instead of reading as it does now, it should read:

Steam service between Canada and New Zealand or Australia or both.

The reason is that we are not able to make any agreement yet with Australia m regard to this subsidy. We have made a contract with New Zealand, that Dominion contributing an amount in proportion to our own. We expect that Australia will come in later. As 1 said, 1 do not think any of these items are contentious.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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May 10, 1911