May 9, 1911

LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Yes.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY.

These timber licenses will not be expropriated by the government?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

It has not been the policy to expropriate them. Of course we propose to handle the timber question in these reservations when we get to it, and have the means, and we propose to handle the timber question in a more detailed manner than we have yet been able to do. But up to the present time, we have not interfered with the right of limit holders whose limits happen to be included in the various reserves. Of course they aie subject to more

stringent regulations in regard to preservation from fire than the general regulations governing reserves. So far as they have a proprietary right, we have not interfered and do not propose to interfere with that right.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

Will the minister tell the House how many acres of timber reserves there are in this portion now set off?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I think I would be safe in saying that the area is the difference between the area of the existing reserve, and the total area of the proposed reserve; that is to say, roughly speaking, the area of the Rocky Mountain forest reserve, if my information is correct, will be about 13,000,000 acres.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

Does the minister mean to say that of this whole reserve of 16,000,000 acres odd, some 13,000,000 acres are already held by timber licensees?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Oh, no.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON
LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I could not answer that question offhand. But I would say that the land held by licensees at the present time is not all in proportion the proposed total area.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON
LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I do not think I could give that just now. The area of this reservation is very large, it includes the whole of the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains. Therefore, the area that could possibly be timbered under conditions suitable for commercial operations is very small as compared with the total area.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

Has the minister any information which he could give to [the House as to the proportion of that which is timbered?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Not now, but I could get it. We have gone into the matter fully, we have very detailed information, and any question in regard to the area or quantities I can give at a later date.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

What the House ought to have, and what would be useful, is, in the first place, the area which is fairly well timbered, and the area which is not timbered but which is suitable for planting or forestation. These two figures put together would give us the area suitable for forest land. We might have 16,000,000 acres and a very small proportion, or a comparatively large proportion of it, might be land which might be useful for the purpose for which a forest reserve was set apart, namely, that timber may toe grown on it, and that all the atmospheric and climatic effects may be gained from it.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

Frederick Laurence Schaffner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SCHAFFNER.

I suppose that these timber licenses were granted before these reserves were set apart?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

Yes.

Mr. SCHAFFNER, Have any been granted since?

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

No.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON
LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

And will not be. We do not propose to hold the timber which is in these forest reserves from use, but we propose to inaugurate a policy which will look to the utilization of the timber and to the reforestation or continued forestation of the land. We have not arrived at that point yet but we hope to do so. In a great measure the public requirements are met by the holders of timber licenses inside and outside the forest reserves, but our purpose, in dealing with the timber in the reserves is, first, the economic utilization of the timber which is useful for commercial purposes and, next, the reproduction of timber so that there shall be a continuous supply.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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CON

Frederick Laurence Schaffner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SCHAFFNER.

That puts a little different face upon the question of these timber reserves and rather changes our ideas. What is the primary object that the minister has in mind in setting apart these timber reserves?

Mr. OLIVER, The primary object is to conserve the sources of water supply by the protection and production, or reproduction, of timber or wood around the sources of the water supply. It is to be supposed that the sources are elevated areas, otherwise hills, and, they being elevated areas, are not the most desirable areas for agricultural purposes. We propose to utilize that land which is, under ordinary conditions, either waste or of much lesser value in this work of conserving the water supply, and at the same time to reproduce the timber growth for the benefit of the dwellers on the prairies surrounding these areas.

Topic:   FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS.
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May 9, 1911