March 10, 1911

CON

Clarence Jameson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JAMESON.

When may we expect a return in regard to the bait freezer at Barrington Passage ordered on the 21st of last month?

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN.
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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of the Naval Service; Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

I shall make inquiries, I thought that was down.

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN.
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SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.


Mr. FIELDING moved that the House go into Committee of Supply.


LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Hon. GEO. P. GRAHAM (Minister of Railways and Canals).

Mr. Speaker, in taking advantage of this opportunity to make a few observations in reference to the transportation problem of the Dominion of Canada, I presume no apology to the House is needed. I admit at the outset that I fear what I have to say will prove dry and to. a certain extent uninteresting in comparison with the discussions that have taken place in the House in the past few weeks; lout the facts, that I will try to place before the House may be useful in further discussions and although some of the figures I shall give may be found in the annual reports at various places, I think probably that if they are placed on ' Hansard ' it will be more convenient for hon. members to get at them, and that they will be of more practical use than if members aie obliged to find them by looking through the reports.

I am of the opinion that transportation has as much to do with the success- of a country as tariff has. These two are interwoven in a measure, but, certainly, if Mr. DANIEL.

we do not provide the methods by which the wealth producers can get the products of their labours to market at a reasonable rate, with fair speed and in good condition, there is little use of having any tariff, and less use of hunting for markets for these products. I think it is no exaggeration to say that in the matter of perfecting transportation facilities by aid from various sources, Canada, possibly, leads the world in the courage she has shown. There is a difference of opinion as to the propriety of further encouraging these great transportation companies by cash subsidies, by land grant, or by guarantee. It is not the policy of the present government, as I understand it, to any more give aid by way of land grants for the extension of transportation facilities. The land of the Dominion of Canada has become too valuable to give in this way, and the potentialities of increase in that value are so great, on account of the rapid development of the country, that it is more practical to give in dollars and cents any aid we have to give. And. besides, when it is given in this way, the people know exactly wdiat they aie paying for the benefits received. I have no fear of the success, present or future, of the railway companies of the Dominion of Canada. If there be north-and-south lines we must not forget that a line running south that can take traffic from Canadian roads also runs north, and can bring traffic to Canadian roads. And, Canada having the geographical position on this continent that she enjoys ought to be able to more than hold her own in the carrying trade of the continent, other things being at all equal. Our rail routes are shorter and we own the largest portion of the waterways that lead from the west to the east. Under these conditions, it rests, I think, with the people of the Dominion of Canada themselves to say whether they shall maintain their carrying trade, and also to say whether they shall, in the future, do their own carrying trade, and also a portion of the carrying trade of the great country to the south of us.

Let me for a moment refer to the Board of Railway Commissioners. I need not take up much time in pointing out the beneficial work being done by the hoard for this country. It is admitted everywhere in Canada, I think it is admitted outside of Canada, that the Board of Railway Commissioners as now constituted is doing better work than any similar body in the world. And it is the most popular tribunal for the settlement of difficulties in which the people are concerned that exists to-day. I will not go into details to show how many applications have been received during the-year. The figures will he found in the report. Day after day the department rereives word of approval of the work being done by this body. The fact that the-

humblest citizen in the Dominion can come either by letter or personally before this board and get his grievance adjusted, is, to my mind, the outstanding beneficial feature of the board. It has been suggested that counsel should be engaged to protect the interest of the public in cases coming before this tribunal. In any large cases, such as investigations of express companies, this is necessary, and it has been done, but where a farmer has a grievance about a crossing it is not necessary, before this democratic board, that he should have any counsel. He merely writes a letter, and probably by return mail, has the satisfaction of having his grievance redressed and of learning that the railway companies have been asked to do what he wants them to do. There has been added to the staff of the board an operating department, presided over by Mr. Nixon, a very active and prominent railway man. The difficulty heretofore in deciding cases, particularly those between the railway companies themselves, was the absence of a head who had had a great deal of practical experience in deciding what was practical operation of railways. _ Consequently railway companies, with their ablest counsel and their own operating men present, were in the position to take strong ground either way, and it was difficult for the board to arrive at proper conclusions. The chairman of the board. ex-Judge Mabee, suggested that an operating department should be established, the head of it to be a practical man, who could give the board advice, and who would know what was practical or not practical in any orders given by the board, or any requests made. The working of that department ^ has proved very beneficial in disputes arising between railways, or between railways and private individuals, as to operation, the work of the board in this respect has been greatly simplified, and it is much easier to get an early decision than it was some years ago.

It may be of interest to the public to know iust the situation of the railways of Canada. The following figures afford a comparison of mileage of main track in operation:

Topic:   SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.
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MILES OF RAILWAY TRACK IN OPERATION.


„„„„ Miles. J9®1 18,140 l999 24,104 _ 1910 24,731 Increase m one year 1909-1910, 627 miles. Increase for ten years, 1901-1910, 6,591 miles. In this mileage, the Grand Trunk Pacific line is not included, it being yet operated as an uncompleted road. The mileage under construction on June 30th last was 4,500 miles. If we add the lines under construction to those already in operation we have a total mileage of close upon 30,000 miles in the Dominion of Canada. 159§ The capital invested in railways in Canada is shown by the followin'* figures: CAPITAL INVESTED IN RAILWAYS. 1909 $1,308,481,416 1910 1,410,297,687 Increase for one year, $101,816,271. 1901 $ 816,110,837 1910 1,410,297,687 Increase for 10 years, $594,186,850. Sir, when you look at the comparatively small debt of the Dominion of Canada, and compare it with the amount alone invested in railways in this country, I think it will be recognized that, for the advancement we are making in our transportation facilities, for the advancement we are making in other lines, the debt of Canada hasbeen kept down remarkably well. Let me now submit to the House some tables bearing on this question:


AID TO RAILWAYS.


1909 $188,963,339 1910 190,753,062 Increase $ 1,789,723 This increase was made up as follows:- By the Dominion $1,382,192 provinces 248,531 municipalities 159,000 In addition to the foregoing cash subsidies, the Dominion in 1910 made a loan of $10,000,000 to the Grand Trunk Pacific. Land subsidies to the extent of 55,292,321 acres have been given by the Dominion and the provinces, of which 32,040,378 acres were granted by the former.


TRAFFIC.


Passengers carried': 1909 32,683,309 1910 35,894,575 Increase 3,211,267 1901 18,385,722 1910 35,894,575 Increase for 10 years.. .. 17,508,853 Tons of freight: 1909 66,842,258 1910 74,482,866 Increase 7.640,608 1901 36,999,371 1910 74,482,866 Increase for 10 years .. 37,483,495 Equal to 101 per cent EARNINGS AND EXPENSES. Gross earnings- 1909 $145,056,336 119)10 173,956,217 Increase $ 28,899.881 '1901 72.898,749 1910 173,956,217 Increase for 10 Oj erating expenses- ,1909. 1910, years.. ..



$ 15,805,35ft Increase



1901 50,368,726 1910 120,405,440 Increase for 10 years $ 70,036,714 Net earnings- 1909 $ 40,456,252 1910 63,550,777 Increase $ 13,0944525 Equal to 32 -3 per cent.


EQUIPMENT.


The railways of Canada added last year to their equipment: Locomotives 110 Passenger cars 138 *Freight cars 1,934 Company's cars 789 These additions brought up the available rolling stock to the following numbers: Locomotives 4,079 Freight cars 119,713 Passenger cars 4,320 Now, the question of transportation is very important as regards the men who are working with their hands as well as with their heads in this work throughout the Dominion. It is customary, in discussing transportation problems, to refer to them as being the property of capitalists, and dominated by them. They are to a certain extent, but the development of our railways, the development of our waterways, is of vital interest to the men who find employment on these railways and on these waterways. Here are the figures: There were in the service of Canadian railways on June 30 last 123,768 employees, whose wage bill amounted to $67,167,703. In addition, there were 16,709 employees engaged in outside operations such as steamers and hotels, whose remuneration amounted to $5,169,923. The aggregate would therefore be 140,477 employees, with a total wage bill of $72,337,626. Assuming that each railway employee represents five persons, it is obvious that about one individual in 10 of our total population finds a livelihood from the railways of Canada. Now, to put it briefly, these figures show I think these facts: The year 1910, measured by the increased volume of traffic measured by the earnings, economic administration, satisfactory maintenance, and swelling mileage, and measured by every proper standard, appears to have been the best year in the history of Canadian railways. Now, leaving railways for a moment, I want to place on record the figures in connection with the canal traffic of the Dominion; because, discuss it as you may, increase our railway facilities as we must, one thing to my mind is absolutely necessary, and that is that Canada must not lag behind in keeping her waterway transportation as fully developed as possible. It is a curious coincidence, perhaps not so curious when you come to go into it in detail, that the greater the increase in railway traffic the greater the increase in canal Mr. GRAHAM _ and waterborne traffic. That arises from the fact that the volume of traffic is greater and that the regulating force of the waterways on .the rates of railways attracts traffic to those particular routes that are so governed. I would like to say, Mr. Speaker, that the way for Canada to secure and to keep for herself an ever-increasing trade is to be alert on the question, not only of railways, but the development of harbours and waterway transportation. Following is a statement of tons of freight passed through the various canals during the years 1909 and 1910: 1909. 1910. [DOT] Increase. Sault Ste. Marie.27,861,245 36,395,687 8,534,442 Welland 2,025,951 2,326,290 300,399St. Lawrence.. .. 2,410,629 2,760,752 350,123Chambly 752,117 669,299 82,818Ottawa.' 336,939 385,261 48 822Rideau 91,774 134,881 43,107St. Peter's.... 79,850 85,951 6,101Murray 102,291 177,941 75,650Trent Valley.. .. 59,952 46,263 13,699St. Andrew's 8 283 8,283 -Total 33,720,748 42,990 603 9,269,8601901 5,665,2591910 42,990,608 Increase for 10 years.. .. 37,325,349 tons. Equal to 660 per cent. It will be observed that while the railway traffic increased 101 per cent the waterborne traffic through our canals increased 660 per cent. This emphasizes what I have said that Canada can keep her carrying trade and add to it if she is alert to the privileges that providence has placed in her way in developing the resources and waterways that we have.


CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART (Lanark).

That waterway traffic, the minister must remember, is not Canadian traffic.

Topic:   SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT.
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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

Well, Mr. Speaker, I would be happy if it were all Canadian, but I am gratified to know that my prophecy has been carried out, and that in addition to carrying Canadian traffic we are also handling a lot of American traffic through our waterways.

Topic:   SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT.
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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART (Lanark).

We are not carrying it; it is the Americans who are carrying it through our waterways.

Topic:   SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT.
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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

It is going through our channels at least. It went through the Sault canal.

Topic:   SUPPLY-TRANSPORTATION IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT.
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March 10, 1911